Muzen Audios retroinspired speakers will impress your inner hipster

first_img Test your music system with these great rock tracks 22 Photos Bluetooth Tags With a battery life of around 10 hours, you’ll have plenty of fun before you need to recharge the speaker via micro-USB. The Muzen OTR is currently on sale in China, the US, France, Germany and the Netherlands. It launches this week in Singapore. The OTR Metal retails for $135 or S$139 (about £80 or AU$145) while the OTR Wood goes for $123 or S$129. Prices may differ in your region, so be sure to check your local stores for updated pricing.img-2633The Muzen OTR Wood has a very nice finish and feel that I quite liked. Aloysius Low/CNET Wireless & Bluetooth Speakerscenter_img 2 Share your voice Comments The Muzen OTR Metal comes with leather straps for carrying around and a cool box packaging.  Aloysius Low/CNET Bluetooth speakers are a dime a dozen these days, but Chinese brand Muzen Audio has added something extra to help its OTR speaker stand out: Radio.The Muzen OTR (or “On The Road”) series comes in a retro-inspired wood or metal finish with tiny analog gold dials. And unlike many other speakers, it can pick up radio broadcasts. The throwback design and unusual feature means you’ll spend longer fiddling with it than you normally would with a speaker.I hardly listen to the radio — Spotify has long filled in that niche — but I occasionally switch it on in the car to catch the news while I’m driving. I think there’s something about the experience of turning the dial to find a radio station that’s missing from digital tuners, but perhaps I’m getting old and nostalgic.muzenotrmetal02The Muzen OTR Metal comes with analog dials. Aloysius Low/CNET Apart from the radio playback, the Muzen OTR is a decent Bluetooth speaker, capable of reaching high volume without losing clarity. It doesn’t pack much bass, but it’s boomy enough that I didn’t find it lacking in most of the songs I tested on the speaker. Personally, I prefer the wood OTR model over the metal, as the shiny finish can be a fingerprint magnet. But the metal model’s vintage looks are more eye-catching. The speaker comes in a cool custom box with removable leather straps you can use to carry it around. last_img read more


8 killed in Nepal landslide

first_imgA view of a flooded road caused by an incessant rainfall in Bhaktapur, Nepal on 12 July. Photo: ReutersA landslide killed a woman and at least seven children in Nepal over the weekend as officials issued warnings on Monday of the risk of more landslides and flash floods due to torrential rain.Working in the downpour, rescuers in Bheri town, about 310 kilometres (193 miles) west of capital Kathmandu, were still searching for a missing boy, having pulled out one survivor.“Army and police personnel are digging with shovels through mud for a 12-year-old boy who is missing,” Krishna Prasad Khatiwada, a senior government official in Bheri, told Reuters by phone.The dead children were aged between three and eleven years.Flash floods and landslides in the June-September monsoon season are common in mostly mountainous Nepal, home to eight of the world’s 14 highest mountains including Mount Everest.Samir Shrestha, an official at the weather forecasting office in Kathmandu, said more landslides and flash floods were likely as heavy rains were forecast for hilly areas in central and western Nepal through Tuesday.Residents in Terai, the southern low lying region bordering India, had been warned to beware of floods as water levels were rising in many rivers, he said.last_img read more


CarbonNanotube Memory that Really Competes

first_imgA side-view schematic of the single-walled carbon-nanotube field-effect transistor, showing the two halfnium dioxide layers (HfO2). The nanotube is represented by the honeycomb pattern in the center of the figure. VGS is the voltage across the transistor’s gate and source. (PhysOrg.com) — Researchers in Finland have created a form of carbon-nanotube based information storage that is comparable in speed to a type of memory commonly used in memory cards and USB “jump” drives. Researchers combine logic, memory to build a ‘high-rise’ chip This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Carbon-Nanotube Memory that Really Competes (2009, January 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-01-carbon-nanotube-memory.html The group’s memory scheme has a write-erase time of 100 nanoseconds, which is about 100,000 times faster than previously reported carbon-nanotube memory, and retains this ability over more than 10,000 write-erase cycles. The work is reported in the January 16, 2009, online edition of Nano Letters.”In terms of speed and endurance, our memory structure is as good as the commercially available Flash memory technologies,” said Helsinki University of Technology physicist Päivi Törmä, the paper’s corresponding author, to PhysOrg.com.The memory scheme stores information using single-walled carbon-nanotube transistors, specifically field-effect transistors, which are among the fastest carbon-nanotube electrical components. Each transistor consists of four key parts, the gate, source, drain, and substrate.As a substrate, Törmä and her colleagues chose a silicon wafer. In collaboration with Finnish technology-equipment company Beneq Oy, they applied a 20-nanometer-thick layer of hafnium oxide using atomic layer deposition, a technique used to deposit materials in very thin layers. The hafnium oxide separates the substrate, which was also used as the gate in this case, from the rest of the structure. Choosing hafnium dioxide as the gate “dielectric” material—an insulator placed between two conductors to separate them—appears to be the key to the device’s fast operation, as it can trap and release charge very quickly and efficiently.On top of the hafnium-oxide layer, the group deposited a few drops of a carbon-nanotube solution, produced using commercially available nanotubes with diameters between 1.2 and 1.5 nanometers and lengths of 100 to 360 nanometers. Using an atomic force microscope, they identified nanotubes with the proper alignment; only those nanotubes became transistors. They then created source and drain electrodes for each nanotube using the metal palladium, with the nanotube forming the transistor’s conductive channel. Finally, the researchers deposited another 20-nanometer layer of hafnium oxide on top of the nanotube transistor, to “passivate” the surface, preventing unwanted reactions.”The fast memory operation we have demonstrated could potentially also be realized using other carbon materials, such as carbon-nanotube bundles or graphene,” said Törmä.Each transistor stores information based on whether current is running through it. When the voltage applied across the transistor reaches a certain threshold, current flows, which can represent one bit of information, either a “0” or a “1” (bit is short for binary digit). For example, when the transistor is conducting it may represent a “1,” and when not conducting, a “0.”Each transistor can store information for about 150,000 seconds, or about 42 hours. This is quite short, although Törmä and her group think they can improve it by adding an oxide layer between the gate and the nanotube.Citation: Nano Lett., Article ASAP DOI: 10.1021/nl8029916Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore furtherlast_img read more