Week in Sports: Hunt out for season, Washington decommits and more

first_img Published on September 6, 2015 at 5:05 pm Contact Sam: sjfortie@syr.edu | @Sam4TR David Salanitri | Staff PhotographerTerrel Hunt tears Achilles, out for seasonIt was confirmed Saturday that Syracuse starting quarterback Terrel Hunt tore his Achilles and would miss the rest of the 2015 season. It’s Hunt’s second season-ending injury in as many seasons. Hunt had been focusing on taking on a leadership position in his senior season and retooled his approach as a pocket passer rather than a runner. In Hunt’s place, freshman Eric Dungey led the Orange to a 47-0 win.More: Terrel Hunt has torn Achilles, will miss rest of 2015 seasonRobert Washington decommits from Syracuse, cites lack of trustFour-star recruit, running back Robert Washington, decommitted from Syracuse. He reportedly decommitted earlier in the summer, but news broke Sunday, Aug. 30. Earlier that morning, Washington created a new Twitter account and said he could no longer access his old one because his father had control of it.More: Robert Washington reportedly decommitted due to trust issues with SU coaching staffLogan Reidsma | Photo EditorOpening day in picturesAs Syracuse drubbed Rhode Island 47-0 in its season opener, The Daily Orange photographers captured the scene. From the fans crowd-surfing and painting mustaches orange to big hits and the band, check out the great galleries from Friday night.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMore: Gallery: Syracuse beats Rhode Island 47-0 in season-opening winand Gallery: Fan scenes from before Syracuse-Rhode IslandCourtesy of Rhode Island AthleticsWhen sports aren’t about sportsEvan Huddon is 15, and listed on the Rhode Island football roster as a quarterback. He was born with a rare and life-threatening spinal condition, but has been an honorary member of the team since 2012, when the team took him in and gave him jersey No. 1.More: Rhode Island embraces Evan Huddon, 15-year-old with spinal defect, as member of teamMoriah Ratner | Asst. Photo EditorTurns out it’s pretty hard to be a long snapperThe Daily Orange staff writer Jesse Dougherty spent an afternoon with Sam Rodgers, Syracuse’s long snapper from 2011-14. He “learned” how to long snap and succeeded twice in about 50 attempts.More: Dougherty: You wouldn’t believe what goes into long snappingLogan Reidsma | Photo EditorRelease of Football GuideIn advance of the 2015 season, The Daily Orange profiled several members of the Syracuse football team. Cornerback Julian Whigam added 15 pounds and stopped eating at Five Guys. Left tackle Ivan Foy overcame immaturity, suspension and injury. Captain Luke Arciniega’s career could have been over, but now he has two seasons to play.Away from Syracuse, Virginia Tech quarterback Michael Brewer’s biggest test has yet to come and a scholarship kicker’s long journey, through three other colleges, to get to Albany.More: Fresh Slate, the 2015 Football Guide Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more


A full breakdown of Syracuse’s ACC semifinal matchup with Clemson

first_imgNo. 15 Syracuse (12-5-2, 3-4-1 Atlantic Coast) will face No. 2 Clemson (15-1-2, 6-1-1) at 7 p.m. on Wednesday in South Carolina in the semifinal of the ACC tournament. The winner will play either Notre Dame or Wake Forest in the ACC championship game on Sunday.Here are four things you need to know before the Orange takes on the Tigers.Sweet RevengeClemson defeated Syracuse, 1-0, in the only meeting between the two teams this year on Oct. 17. The Orange and Tigers were gridlocked in a scoreless game until SU midfielder Oyvind Alseth coughed up the ball near midfield with less than a minute remaining.Alseth was the last man back because Syracuse was coming off a corner kick, so Clemson’s Kyle Murphy streaked down an open field to score in a one-on-one chance with SU goalie Hendrik Hilpert.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAfter the game, Alseth crouched down on the field, covering his head with his jersey and wiping his face.“For the team and for myself personally the ending of that game was tough,” Alseth said. “I’ve been waiting for a moment to redeem myself ever since that game and now the chance is here. I just have to seize it.”Syracuse succeeded in its first revenge game against North Carolina on Sunday. SU had blown a 1-0 lead in the final 17 minutes the first time it played the Tar Heels, but emerged victorious on Sunday after penalty kicks to advance in the ACC tournament.One common goalSU has only been shutout once this year, against the Tigers and goalkeeper Andrew Tarbell. The junior tallied four saves — three in the second half — but the Orange didn’t present as many challenges between the posts as it could have with 11 corner kicks to Clemson’s three.Dating back to the team’s last matchup three weeks ago, Tarbell’s allowed two goals combined in five games since.“We have to test the goalkeeper much more than we did before,” SU forward Chris Nanco said. “See what he’s made out of.”Ben Polk, Nanco’s counterpart on the Orange’s front line, fired off three shots on goal against Clemson, only to be turned away by the ACC’s leader in save percentage and shutouts. Alseth was the only other SU player to record a shot between the posts.Even against an elite netminder, Nanco said familiarity will benefit Syracuse’s attack from better knowing how deep Tarbell prefers to stay in the net or when he chooses to come out. It’s a matter of execution for a Syracuse team that’s averaged the fourth-most goals per game, still behind the second-place Tigers.“If you give a team like Clemson time, it turns good players into great players,” Polk said. “ … We know (Tarbell’s) good.“Still (have to) test him. Anything can happen.”Saving graceSyracuse head coach Ian McIntyre said along with Tarbell, Orange freshman goalkeeper Hendrik Hilpert is one of the top goalies in the conference.Hilpert, who has started every game in net for Syracuse since coming back from a preseason injury on Oct. 2, holds a 1.05 goals-against average and a 66.7 save percentage. He’s coming off a season-best four-save performance in which he made multiple acrobatic stops.While Hilpert has been between the posts, he and the SU defense have registered two shutouts and never allowed more than two goals in a game.“There are two good goalkeepers,” Hilpert said. “We will see who’s the better one in this game.”In SU’s first matchup with Clemson, Hilpert made three desperation saves in the first half, including two that he punched just over the crossbar. He was perfect against Clemson’s then-top scoring offense until Alseth’s turnover left him out to dry in the final minute.“Last time, it was tough for them to do something against us,” Hilpert said. “We had very good defense against them. It was difficult for them to shoot a goal.”More than a hopeThe biggest difference between Syracuse now and when the Orange lost to the Tigers in the first matchup is the confidence of the team, Hilpert said.Before beating UNC on Sunday, Syracuse was winless in four matchups against ranked teams this season. SU tied then-No. 23 Louisville on Sept. 11, lost 3-1 against then-No. 7 Wake Forest a week later and blew the lead against then-No. 2 North Carolina on Oct. 10.When the Orange defeated UNC to advance to the semifinals against the Tigers, Hilpert said the team realized they could win against the top teams in the country instead of just playing close.“We were coming from hoping to be a good a team. This was our goal at the beginning,” Hilpert said of the feeling prior to the first game against Clemson. “But now we know that we are a good team. Now we know that we can win against Clemson.“I think Clemson will face a much better opponent on Wednesday. We’re ready for them.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 9, 2015 at 10:20 pm Contact Jon: jrmettus@syr.edu | @jmettuslast_img read more


Syracuse men’s basketball game day: What to know about N.C. State matchup

first_img Published on February 1, 2017 at 7:03 am Contact Paul: pmschwed@syr.edu | @pschweds Syracuse (13-9, 5-4 Atlantic Coast) travels to Raleigh to take on North Carolina State (14-8, 3-6) on Wednesday at 7 p.m. The Orange is 5-2 against conference opponents outside the Top 25 but has yet to win a game outside of the Carrier Dome this season.Here are answers to your most pressing game day questions.How can you watch the game? Syracuse-N.C. State will air on ESPN2. Here are channel listings based on provider.• Time Warner: 301 and 25 for non-digital subscribers• Verizon Fios: 574 (high-definition) and 74 (standard-definition)• DirecTV: 209• Dish Network: 144• New Visions: 760 (high-definition) and 74 (standard-definition)How can Tyler Lydon contribute without scoring? In nearly every other facet of the game. He can still be Syracuse’s best player even when he doesn’t fill up the scoring column.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHow has Andrew White improved throughout this season? His defense has gotten a lot better recently.What did Jim Boeheim and Mark Gottfried say before the matchup? Take a look at recaps of the two coaches’ appearances on the ACC teleconference. (Boeheim, Gottfried)What do our beat writers think will happen? Check out their picks, here.Anything else to know about the Wolfpack? Here’s a preview of N.C. State. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more


Amid Syracuse’s 13-goal outbreak against RIT, 3 players scored their first career goals

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Skating behind the play on Saturday against Rochester Institute Technology, Syracuse freshman forward Taylor Curtis called for the puck, coming closer to the unguarded net.Still without a defender near her, Curtis gathered a feed from across the ice and easily placed away the first goal of her career.A day after tallying her first point with an assist, Curtis became one of three new goal scorers for Syracuse (11-17-2, 10-5-1 College Hockey Association) last weekend. Curtis joined sophomore defender Allie Olnowich and freshman forward Ronnie Callahan, who both scored the day before.With the additional three scorers from the wins over RIT, Syracuse now has 16 different goal scorers on the season, with Avery as the only player in double-digits. All but two of SU players that have played in every game this season have scored a goal. After scoring one goal over the three-game stretch leading up to SU’s matchups with RIT, the Orange scored 13 in two games.“As an opposing coach, that’s the kiss of death when you hear ‘and their first career goal,’ especially this late in the year,” head coach Paul Flanagan said. “For us, that was a good omen when you have three people get their first career goal.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCurtis’ assist to Callahan on Friday was more meaningful than just a first for both players. The two played together on a Massachusetts-based club team, the East Coast Wizards, prior to coming to Syracuse.“It’s helped us that we’ve played together before,” Curtis said. “I know we were both thrilled to get our first goals this weekend. It was huge.”In the first game of the two-game series against RIT, six minutes into the third period, Olnowich skated into the offensive zone. With three Tiger defenders standing in front of net, Olnowich decided to try her luck at goal. Firing the puck in the gap between two of the RIT skaters, Olnowich sniped her first career goal into the back of the net.To have young players succeed early in their careers and on the same night was great, junior defender Allie Munroe said.Entering last weekend’s series, the Orange had scored one goal in its past three games. While RIT is much weaker than No. 2 Clarkson, No. 5 Cornell or Mercyhurst, who is currently second in the CHA, the offense’s 13-goal outburst against RIT and the celebration of three new goal-scorers is nothing but a positive sign.“I think it was really important to get the monkey off our back from the last three games,” Flanagan said. “That’s just sports … things are cyclical sometimes within a season.” Comments Published on February 15, 2018 at 12:22 am Contact Adam: adhillma@syr.edu | @_adamhillmanlast_img read more


Daniels: Grateful Red impacted by latest ticket change

first_imgWhile the UW men’s basketball season may still be nearly two months away from its regular season opener at the Kohl Center Nov. 11, it’s already that time of year again for UW students to reserve their spots in the Grateful Red student section for the 2012-2013 season.Since its first season in 1998, the Kohl Center has had the pleasure to boast a 2,100-seat student section extending from the floor to the nosebleeds on the south end of the court as part of a stadium seating capacity of over 17,000. That makes the Kohl Center one of the bigger college basketball venues in the country. And since the Grateful Red’s inaugural season in 2002 – when the student section was renamed after previously being called “Mr. Bennett’s Neighborhood” before former head coach Dick Bennett’s resignation during the 2000-2001 season – it has been just that: a hostile environment for any team brave enough to play there.To illustrate how overwhelming a place like the Kohl Center can be: Since Bo Ryan’s first game coaching the Badgers in 2001, the team has gone an unbelievable 166-15 (yes, you read that right) at home, giving the Badgers at the Kohl Center the fourth-best winning percentage in all of NCAA Division I basketball as of 2011.Unfortunately, the intimidating presence of the Grateful Red may not be quite so intimidating in future seasons.Division I college basketball attendance at home games has been in a slow decline across the country since the 2008 season, and while UW men’s basketball tickets have still managed to sell out regularly during that span, many team’s tickets – especially student tickets – increasingly go unused each year.In response to the disturbing trend, the UW Athletic Department has tried multiple strategies to once again fill the student section to the rafters over the last few years – including a shift to half-season ticket packages, the creation of a winter break package and many free giveaways, like free shirts, throughout the season – with varying degrees of success.This year, though, when tickets went on sale to students early this morning at 7:30, they came with one major change from last year’s ticket plan: a return to one massive ticket package, containing a whopping 15 home games throughout the season, priced at $150.From a ticket-selling standpoint, the return to one package initially might seem like a smart move by the UW Athletic Department. The die-hard fans who were awake early this morning to get the limited tickets – the new plan creates half as many season tickets as in past years – are more likely to consistently go to games, but it also leaves questions for the future of the Grateful Red this season and beyond.By returning to the old format of just one package, with the ability to add on a four-game winter break package for $40 more, the athletic department magnified the pressure on the students to make sure the Grateful Red is filled during each game this season.While before it was fairly easy to attend seven to nine games a season by purchasing one of the two season ticket packages, now any student who buys tickets this year will be faced with attending every one of the 15 home games. This becomes a daunting task when many of the games fall on weeknights and coincide with midterms and finals.As a result, many tickets will likely go unused if students choose not to use, or can’t manage to sell, their unwanted tickets. It’s a phenomenon that could leave sections 114 through 117 emptier than usual this winter.Still, while this most certainly doesn’t mean Wisconsin will host talented teams like Michigan Feb. 9 or Ohio State Feb. 17 in front of an empty student section, many of the non-marquee games may experience a dip in student attendance simply because UW students don’t have time to go to so many games in a single season.The continuation of the winter break ticket package again this year has the potential to be an even more damaging effect that this ticket plan could have on student attendance and the team’s performance. The winter break package, which gives students the option to avoid having to try to sell games during the month-long winter break, can be particularly useful for students who return home or are out of town during break, but it also discourages students from going to those games altogether if they don’t already have the money invested in tickets to winter break games.If last year’s winter break package experiment was any indication, the Badgers could be in for rough winter break again this season if the student section continues to have low winter break attendance.Out of five home games included in the winter break package last year, the Badgers lost two – including an unexpected loss to an Iowa Hawkeyes team that finished with a measly 3-9 record away from home in 2011-2012 – on their way to four total home losses for the season.So, despite the almost unreal success the Badgers have had at home over the last decade, if Bo’s most dependable sixth man, the Grateful Red, can no longer provide the intimidating environment fans have become accustomed to at the Kohl Center, that impressive record may be put to the test more frequently in the coming season and beyond.Nick is a junior majoring in journalism. Do you agree or disagree with the UW Athletic Department consolidating the ticket packages? Let him know at ndaniels@badgerherald.com.last_img read more


White eyes starting spot in final season

first_imgAndy Fate / The Badger HeraldFor almost his entire life, James White has never been the lead running back.When he was a three-star running back from Saint Thomas Aquinas High School in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., White was just an accent to his four-star teammate and UNC-commit Giovanni Bernard.When White arrived at Wisconsin, he was the speed to John Clay’s strength. He might have been the leading rusher, but he wasn’t the lead back.Montee Ball was the next man for White to supplement. Ball was the bratwurst. White was the beverage. Maybe Melvin Gordon was the finishing condiment. Once again, White was second in line. That all might start to change … maybe.In his last spring camp as a Badger, White has jumped up the depth chart, some would say by default, to the lead running back spot, as far as repetitions go. Finally.“James has done a good job this spring of establishing himself,” running backs coach Tom Hammock said. “He’s demanding his touches and he’s earning them. Every day he comes out to practice and earns more reps, so I’m looking forward to seeing how that develops once the season starts.”“Once the season starts” is off in the distance for White, some four and a half months before the Badgers take to Camp Randall for the regular season. It likely seems even further in the distance for the running back who has been in competition each of the last five or six years.The competition he shared with Ball didn’t leave as the clock expired on Ball’s illustrious career; it has actually probably heightened since the departure of the all-time touchdowns leader.Joining White in the Badgers’ backfield again is redshirt sophomore Melvin Gordon. The exciting jet-sweep specialist from 2012 excelled enough toward the end of the season to get many thinking White would once again be singing the second verses of the running back band.But while Gordon has been sidelined recently for Wisconsin’s practice, redshirt junior Jeff Lewis also threw his name into the mix, rushing for 74 yards on 16 carries during Saturday’s scrimmage, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. No matter where he seems to go, White tends to bring a competition with him.“I won’t say committee, but I’m going to let these guys fight for those carries,” Hammock said of his attempts to fill the void left by Ball, which may take all of three backs to satisfy. “If you want 20 carries, fight for them, and then go out there and earn it during the game.”It’s obvious that fighting for carries is nothing new to No. 20. What is likely new for him, however, is the leadership role he is now thrust into as the lone senior running back. Until this point, White always had an upperclassman leading the way. Now it’s his turn to lead.“We’re all competing out here, all the running backs. Everybody is fighting for that starting job,” White said. “I’m just trying to work hard and have a positive attitude out here and try to lead by example.”He sure did that during Saturday’s scrimmage. White did most of his damage on a pair of long runs in addition to a goal line touchdown carry. White said those carries are exactly how he likes to run; taking what his offensive line gives him and “wait for the long runs to come.”Those long runs are a big part of what White brings to the table as a running back. They are a big reason why he leads the nation in rushing among all returning running backs.While Ball had his days of explosiveness, White’s pedigree stems from finding seams and accelerating into the defensive backfield. It’s what Hammock enjoys seeing from him, too.“For the type of back that you are, you’ve got to make people miss,” Hammock said,  reciting what he tells White. “At the end of the day, when you’re in the open field, you’ve got to want it. That changes drives, that changes games, that changes seasons.”Having White lead the backfield also changes things a bit for redshirt sophomore fullback Derek Watt.Watt earned the starting fullback position in 2012 and will more than likely own the position again this season. He’ll be blocking for an entirely different lead back, however, regardless of whether White is the man or not.“[White] is a little more shifty – he can get outside and he can squeeze through little openings,” Watt said. “He’s a little different than Montee, not quite as big; he’s a lot smaller. But he’s got his own little way of doing things.”That might come from his upbringing, or at least Hammock would like to think so. His coach presumes that, if it comes White’s way, assuming the lead running back spot would be a product of how his parents raised him.“The one thing about James White is that he is the most solid, hard-working individual that I’ve been around,” Hammock said. “He’s going to come to work every day and not say two words.”“I call him the true professional because he knows what it takes.”last_img read more


Wisconsin turns in Elite performance, routs Baylor

first_imgANAHEIM, Calif. — All of the talk surrounding Baylor heading into the Sweet 16 was its daunting zone defense. It was still the story after the game, but for a much different reason.Wisconsin’s frontcourt of Nigel Hayes and Frank Kaminsky shredded Baylor’s defense for a combined 29 points in the Badgers’ 69-52 Sweet 16 win.Kaminsky led all scorers with 19 points and 6 blocks. Hayes picked up 10 and senior guard Ben Brust had 14 points with three 3-pointers.Forward Cory Jefferson led Baylor with 15 points and sophomore center Isaiah Austin pitched in with 12.Wisconsin’s big men controlled the game from the start as Kaminsky sparked the Badgers’ offense to an 8-2 run to start the game with six early points.“They were better on the inside than I had thought they would be,” Baylor coach Scott Drew said. “On film I thought they were good, but I thought we’d cause a little more trouble inside, and we didn’t do that. So credit Hayes and kaminsky and those guys for doing a good job on the interior. That really hurt our defense.”The Bears were getting caught with gaping holes in the middle of their zone that the Badgers were able to exploit with midrange jumpers and drives to the basket.“They left the middle of the zone open a little bit and we were able to get the ball in there and get some easy baskets to the rim, some easy kick-outs for threes,” Kaminsky said. “So we just kind of hammered it into the middle and made some things happen.”Ben Brust would add to the first half effort with two three-pointers as Wisconsin shot 48 percent from the floor through the first 20 minutes.Heading into the locker room, the Badgers owned a 29-16 lead over a team that had trailed for a total of just 1:04 entering the Sweet 16.“Throughout the whole tournament we haven’t really played from behind so the fact that they played the whole shot clock when they had the ball, it makes it difficult to come back on a team like that,” Baylor senior guard Gary Franklin said.Baylor’s 16 first-half points marked a season low for the Bears and the third-lowest scoring half under coach Drew.Wisconsin held Baylor to 20 percent shooting as it connected on just five of its 24 field goal attempts—the same amount of field goals Kaminsky made on his on in the first half.“At the end of the day, shooting is one of those things that sometimes becomes contagious, unfortunately we missed some easy ones,” Drew said. “We just didn’t finish like we have been and you have to credit Wisconsin’s size, strength and physicality for that.”It was more of the same for Wisconsin in the second half as it picked apart Baylor’s defense.The Bears would quickly switch to a man defense, but that didn’t slow down the Badgers who continued to get to the rim and finish high-percentage looks.Wisconsin would stretch its lead to 21 points with just over 10 minutes to go in the game and effectively put the game out of reach for a Baylor comeback.The Badgers bested their first half shooting performance by connecting on 57 percent on its shots in the second half, a nine percent improvement.Baylor more than doubled its first half scoring total in the final half, but couldn’t stop Wisconsin’s offensive attack, never getting within 17 points in the final 10 minutes of the game.“We just stayed disciplined and focused and listening to the scouting report,” Sam Dekker said of his team’s defensive effort. “Our coaches did such a good job of prepping us for this game and we had a lot of time to prepare for these guys. They threw a lot at us, but we recognized it well.”With the win, Wisconsin advances to the Elite Eight for the third time in school history and the second time under coach Ryan. It will be the first time the Badgers make an appearance in the Elite Eight since 2005.Wisconsin will take on Arizona Saturday at the Honda Center with a Final Four bid on the line.“We get 40 more minutes, and I’m awfully proud of them,” coach Ryan said.last_img read more


Badgers beat DePaul, snowy conditions to move on to second round

first_imgPlaying in what turned out to be a wintery vortex at the McClimon Soccer Complex Saturday night, fourth-seeded Wisconsin women’s soccer topped the previously undefeated DePaul Blue Demons in a memorable 2-0 match to advance to the second round of the NCAA tournament.With players on both sides slipping left and right, forwards found open space more often than usual, leading to a combined 14 shots in the first half. Leading the charge early for DePaul in the first half was sophomore forward Abby Reed, who had three breakaway shots on-target in the first 45 minutes.Despite Reed beating the Badgers (19-2-2) back line and earning one-on-one opportunities on those occasions, Wisconsin’s senior goalkeeper Genevieve Richard recorded a series of miraculous saves to keep the Badgers in it.Richard noted the importance of making a statement with an early lead, and a big part of that is keeping the shutout intact to support the offense.“I think it helps the team a lot to keep a clean sheet, and it gives us the opportunity to score first and that’s always good,” Richard said. “It just leads to a good momentum, so I’m just glad I did my job.”While DePaul (16-1-4) had trouble finishing their chances in the opening minutes, the Badgers certainly did not. Just 12 minutes into the game, junior midfielder Kinley McNicoll found an open lane into the box, crossing it through the defense to senior forward Cara Walls. Walls then promptly redirected the pass with a header that bounced into the left corner of the goal for the 1-0 lead.The assist was the team-leading 27th point scored by McNicoll, while the goal was number 12 for Walls, also tops on the Badgers.A little while later in the 20th minute, the Badgers got some insurance, upping their lead to 2-0 after redshirt senior forward Kodee Williams found Walls over the middle for a sliding goal through the increasingly snowy field.Looking back at her early goals and the conditions on the field, Walls said the snow really only hindered her ability to fire shots.“I honestly thought the conditions weren’t as bad,” Walls said. “I felt that I was able to pass the ball fine and I don’t think the conditions played as big of a role in the chances of opportunities we created.”For a team that averaged less than one goal allowed per game all season, the Blue Demons found themselves in an early hole, but with plenty of time left to respond. Perhaps due to the snowy field, the Badgers defense appeared more vulnerable than usual, giving up a few costly turnovers in the first half. On one occasion in the closing minutes of the first half, an errant pass back over the middle intended for Richard was intercepted by Reed, who had an open look but barely missed the net wide right.The near miss for Reed epitomized the frustrating night for DePaul’s offense, which finished the night with five shots on-target compared to the Wisconsin’s seven.After a fast-paced first half, the second half showcased far fewer scoring opportunities as the field got increasingly slick and players lost their footing. While the refs appeared to be relatively lenient with calling fouls, there were still plenty to go around, with Wisconsin committing 14 of the 20 total.The big difference maker was Wisconsin’s back line finding some rhythm after a spotty first half. After giving the defense fits in the opening segment, Reed had no on target attempts in the final 45 minutes and was essentially taken out of the game by the Badgers defense, led by senior Alexandra Heller and junior Brianna Stelzer.The Badgers offense successfully maintained control of the ball in the attacking third for the majority of the second half, but couldn’t capitalize. Looking for a dagger in the 84th minute, a sneaky pass to McNicoll in the box looked promising, but DePaul junior goalkeeper Alejandria Godinez stole the ball away before a finishing touch could be made.Sensing the fate of their season in the balance, DePaul began to play desperately in the closing moments. The Blue Demon offense tried several shots from long range, likely hoping for Richard to succumb to the slick field and miss a save. The efforts, however, were too little too late, as the final 2-0 score line punched the Badgers’ ticket to Tallahassee for the second round.After spending two hours in ice and snow, head coach Paula Wilkins said the idea of heading down south for the second round was more than welcoming for her team. That being said, Wilkins emphasized the trip will be business as usual.“I think the players are excited to be in a little bit warmer climate,” Wilkins said. “But, it’s definitely not going to be a vacation for us. They are going to be focused and they have some goals in mind. It will be very exciting.”The Badgers will be on the pitch next against UCF Nov. 21 at the Florida State campus, starting at 3:30 p.m. CT.last_img read more


Football: Chryst doesn’t want Badgers to rest on upset win

first_imgAfter one of the biggest wins in program history against a Louisiana State University team many experts picked to make the College Football Playoffs, the Wisconsin football team returned home this weekend with high expectations for the rest of the season.To fulfill those lofty expectations, however, the Badgers still have their work cut out for them.Football: Breakdown of Badgers’ upset over LSUThe Wisconsin Badgers played a spoiler game against fifth ranked Louisiana State University with a 16-14 upset victory in college Read…When asked about his team’s performance Saturday, Wisconsin head coach Paul Chryst’s answers began to follow a pattern that grew more noticeable as Monday’s press conference wore on. With each compliment he gave his team, he also issued a challenge.The message he was trying to make was clear — despite the well-played game, the Badgers need to get better if they hope to achieve what they have set out to do.“There’s areas where we’ve got to get better, and that’s what we’ve got to focus on this week,” Chryst said.While never giving specifics about where his team can improve, Chryst made it clear that he believes each player is capable of playing better and growing as part of the team.Fullbacks, the offensive line, the defensive secondary and his quarterback Bart Houston were all examples the head coach gave of groups that can improve their play heading into this week’s match up against the Akron Zips of the Mid-American Conference. Even Rafael Gaglianone, who went 3-3 on his field goals, including the 47-yarder in the fourth quarter to cap off the comeback, was at one point the focus of a conversation on where the team could improve as a whole.In photos: UW fans’ fairytale comes true with Badger win at LambeauThe football game this Saturday couldn’t have been any more magical for Wisconsinites as their two pride and joys were Read…With Akron, Wisconsin turns its attention to a mid-tier program fresh off a 47-24 win over the Virginia Military Institute, but MAC teams have a history of taking advantage of unsuspecting Power Conferences teams. At least one team from the MAC has defeated a Big Ten team each of the last 10 seasons after Western Michigan defeated Northwestern 22-21 this past Saturday.While discussing Akron, Chryst noted the powerful spread offense they run in contrast to the power running LSU team.“It’s going to stress us differently than last week,” Chryst said. “They’re going to spread us out and we’ve got to play good assignment football.”Doing so will be even harder now with the news that inside linebacker Chris Orr is sidelined for the rest of the season with a right ACL injury suffered in the game against LSU.Football: Orr out with ACL injury for remainder of seasonWisconsin football head coach Paul Chryst broke the news Monday that inside linebacker Chris Orr will miss the remainder of Read…With the way Ryan Connelly stepped up during the game, Chryst isn’t worried about individual players. The focus right now is the team as a whole. In Chryst’s mind there’s a lot of work that needs to be done — a concept he made abundantly clear.last_img read more


Women’s hockey: Badgers fall short but leave impressive legacy

first_imgEven though the season came to a bitter end, the University of Wisconsin women’s hockey team still has so much to be proud of.For starters, the Badgers managed to edge out their rivals, 2016 NCAA champions, the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities for the USCHO.com No. 1 pre-season ranking. Even though Wisconsin fell to Minnesota during the semifinal round of the 2016 NCAA Frozen Four tournament, it was the Badgers’ impressive talent and intense work ethic that made USCHO.com choose them over the Gophers.One of the key reasons behind this ranking was Wisconsin’s senior goaltender Ann-Renée Desbiens, who had managed to earn an impressive 21 shutouts during the 2015-16 season. Along with an impressive number of shutouts, Desbiens also held an NCAA record for save percentage (.960) and goals-against average (.76) for the season.Women’s hockey: Badgers bring home WCHA title for third year in a rowFor the third year in a row, the University of Wisconsin women’s hockey team is WCHA postseason champion. The Badgers (31-2-4-0, Read…Desbiens had much to build on, and it appeared she had a high bar set for herself during the 2016-17 season. Desbiens not only kept up with the intense standards she had achieved last season, but she added several more records to her resume, including a record number of career shutouts (54) for either a man or a woman, a .963 save percentage and .71 goals-against average.Desbiens was just one of the six Wisconsin seniors who would help this team achieve greatness. Senior captain and forward Sydney McKibbon would prove to be quite the asset when Wisconsin needed her the most.If the Badgers found themselves with a need to score, it was McKibbon they called on. McKibbon would end the season with a grand total of 32 points (13 goals, 19 assists) for the Badgers, making her the fourth-highest scorer for UW.McKibbon was also assisted by Sarah Nurse, who made a major scoring impact for Wisconsin this year. Nurse has an impressive 53 points (25 goals, 28 assists), a +42 record for the season and an astonishing three hat tricks this year. Nurse would be the second-highest scorer for UW this season, and her absence will leave a great hole for the Badgers come 2017-18.Nurse’s fellow line mate Annie Pankowski truly anchored the Badger team this season. Even though Pankowski started off the season with a bit of a scoring slump, not scoring a goal until Nov. 16 against the University of Minnesota, Duluth, this slow start did not phase her, as she would end the season with a total of 55 points (25 points, 30 assists), a +42 record and two hat tricks.The first line was completed with Emily Clark, who truly managed to win some games for Wisconsin this year. Clark had a grand total of 9 game-winning goals this season, which added to a grand total of 46 points (20 goals, 26 assists) and a +48 record, the highest overall on the team.It wasn’t just the upperclassman that led this Badger team to an outstanding season. Freshmen like Abby Roque, who garnered the WCHA Rookie of the Year award, Presley Norby, Mekenzie Steffen, with 2 game-winning goals, Alexis Mauermann and Maddie Rowe all made quite an impact during their first year.Another freshman who made some waves this year was goaltender Nikki Cece, who is expected to step in for Desbiens after she graduates. Cece skated into the net when Desbiens sustained a concussion early this season, and managed to earn four wins and even get her first shut out in her collegiate career.Women’s hockey: No. 1 Wisconsin three wins away from national champion crownIn their final home game of the 2016-17 season, the University of Wisconsin women’s hockey team will take on ECAC’s Read…Even though the season ended without Wisconsin bringing home the NCAA championship trophy, the Badgers still managed to win the WCHA regular-season and post-season titles. Wisconsin ended their season with a 33-3-4 record in the NCAA and a 22-2-4 record in the WCHA.Wisconsin will retire some truly great seniors this year, with Desbiens, Nurse, McKibbon, Mikayla Johnson, Jenny Ryan and Mellissa Channell all completing their final season of eligibility this year. This senior class has helped Wisconsin earn three WCHA post-season titles, two WCHA regular-season titles and four Frozen Four appearances.With so much accomplished this year, and with Wisconsin retaining three of their top five scorers (Pankowski, Clark, Roque) next year, the team’s 2016-17 run is yet another amazing season the Badgers can add to the record books.last_img read more