University abandons plans to establish joint college in China

first_imgThe University is no longer pursuing plans to establish a joint college with Zhejiang University (ZJU) in China, according to a letter addressed to faculty from J. Nicholas Entrikin, vice president and associate provost for internationalization, sent Monday morning.Eric Richelsen Although Notre Dame will continue to foster a relationship with ZJU through exchange programs and research projects, the two universities decided not to embark on the joint venture due to challenges that arose during the deliberation process, Entrikin said in the letter.“After many hopeful and positive conversations on both curricular and administrative matters related to the joint college, we were more easily able to discriminate and to delineate some of the key challenges as well as advantages in bringing together two very different approaches to higher education,” Entrikin said. “Thorough effort was expended in addressing these complexities, and at times the conversations showed exhilarating signs of progress.“In the end, however, some areas remained challenging for both universities, and we decided that broader cooperation would be a more effective means for achieving our common interests.”Entrikin and Jonathan Noble, acting executive director for the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies, wrote a white paper addressed to Notre Dame faculty members in October 2014 explaining the possible collaboration between the two schools.The white paper said the joint liberal arts college aimed to “advance Notre Dame’s global academic reputation; promote worldwide Notre Dame’s unique and successful blend of teaching, research and service and offer opportunities for Notre Dame faculty and students to gain valuable experience teaching and studying in China.”According to the original white paper proposal, the Notre Dame-ZJU joint liberal arts college would have opened the 2017-2018 academic year. The student body would have been composed of 70 percent Chinese students and 30 percent international students. The college’s faculty would have been composed of members from both universities, and graduating students would have received a joint degree from both Notre Dame and ZJU.Over the past two years, faculty advisory delegations from both universities have made multiple campus visits — to both South Bend and Haining — to examine the project, Entrikin said. The committee reached its final conclusion after the most recent visit to China, made by a delegation that included Entrikin, University President Fr. John Jenkins, Vice President for Mission Engagement and Church Affairs Fr. William Lies and several members of the Board of Trustees.Entrikin said both universities have “gained a more comprehensive mutual understanding” and have agreed to continue discussions about future forms of collaboration. This summer, the University will host eight ZJU rising seniors participating in Notre Dame International’s iSURE program, which allows international students to participate in engineering and science research on campus.Ultimately, Entrikin said the experience has helped the University plan and develop current and new international programs, especially those in China.“Our Zhejiang colleagues now better understand what it means to be an excellent Catholic university, and we now better understand the academic achievements and aspirations of one of China’s leading universities,” he said. “On the foundation of this newly acquired shared understanding, we may now begin to proceed rapidly in building substantial and innovative partnership programs that will benefit both of our academic communities.”Tags: China, joint college, Zhejiang partnership, zhejiang University, ZJUlast_img read more


ANALYSIS – FARC Leader’s Death Could Speed Peace Talks in Colombia

first_imgBy Dialogo September 27, 2010 This democracy that the world and its political parties have, is something that any group of people without morals has, they assist and nurture this type of sickness found in all societies. The gangs and the misery Colombia has is not new, and the politicians offer this in their political platform but then they do nothing. I want and support democracy, because it allows us to go on “living in liberty” with the citizens who live with politicians who are mentally ill not only in Colombia, Mexico, U.S.A, and from there on down to the east and west of Patagonia, I don’t know what needs to happen, I don’t have the one true answer but since I reached the age of reason during my 71 years, I don’t see the way nor will I see a change, thank you for allowing me to make this statement. The death of the Colombian FARC guerrilla group’s military commander during Operation Sodom was a blow to the heart of the rebel group that could accelerate its decline and force its leaders to negotiate for peace with the government. Jorge Briceño Suárez, better known as “El Mono Jojoy,” fell fighting soldiers following a bombardment of his camp that began early in the morning on 22 September, in a jungle area near the municipality of La Macarena, in southeastern Colombia. While combat was underway, on the same day, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) announced in a statement their willingness to negotiate for peace with President Juan Manuel Santos, but without submitting to any conditions. However, the president, a former defense minister in the previous administration, which maintained a hard line against the guerrilla group with the support of the United States, is demanding a suspension of hostilities before sitting down to the table. Now, the death of the veteran Briceño Suárez, a fifty-nine-year-old guerrilla fighter, could increase the pressure on the rebel group, which is experiencing the worst crisis in its history, according to specialists. “For this organization, El Mono Jojoy was the equivalent of the commandant of the Army,” said former peace commissioner Víctor G. Ricardo. “It’s a blow to their military strategy; it’s a blow to the organization’s morale,” he added. A decade ago, Ricardo was one of the participants in the negotiations launched in 1999 by then-president Andrés Pastrana, when the rebel group was much more powerful. The talks collapsed in 2002. With the recent death of the guerrilla leader, considered a hardliner within the FARC, a light at the end of the tunnel is beginning to become visible. “With that military strength having been diminished, dialogue has to be near,” said Guillermo González, a former defense minister and current governor of the department of El Cauca. A SINGLE PATH Santos made peace negotiations with the rebels conditional on their releasing those they have kidnapped, suspending attacks, and announcing their readiness to lay down their arms. “Unacceptable, arrogant, and triumphalist” was the rebel group’s characterization of Santos’s demands. Meanwhile, the president promised to maintain the offensive against the FARC begun by his predecessor Alvaro Uribe. For former president Pastrana, the message that the administration has sent to the FARC’s commander-in-chief, Alfonso Cano, is that he could suffer the same fate as “El Mono Jojoy” and that the rebels should understand that the only path is that of peace. “They (the FARC) have no possibility of recovering their military strength; it’s an absolutely irreversible process of decline in both the political and the military spheres,” analyst Alfredo Rangel said for his part. “It’s to be expected that the psychological impact and the demoralization caused by this blow will lead dozens or hundreds of members of the guerrilla group to desert,” he explained. Despite everything, the guerrilla group still has the ability to cause headaches for Santos with high-impact attacks in jungle regions and even in urban centers. In fact, in recent weeks the FARC launched attacks in which more than thirty soldiers and police personnel died, leading the armed forces to redouble their offensive. “The deaths of police and military personnel, the deaths of guerrillas, the dramas that the inhabitants of the countryside experience in the midst of armed operations should lead us to construct a space for dialogue,” said Sen. Piedad Córdoba of the Liberal Party. Thousands of combatants have abandoned the ranks of the FARC since Uribe began military operations, reducing the rebel forces to 8,000 men from the 17,000 they once had, according to calculations by security sources.last_img read more


American Consumer Council gains Associational SEG Status: What does it mean for credit unions?

first_imgwith Mike LawsonAfter a lengthy review with the NCUA (15 months), the American Consumer Council (ACC) has gained its long-awaited Associational SEG status. So what does this mean for credit unions? Turns out it’s very good news for the industry as the ACC is a direct conduit for millennials to credit unions — and we all know that CUs need to get younger for a bright future. So this status for ACC is a nice shot in the arm for credit unions.So we ventured down to the ACC headquarters, which happens to be here in San Diego, for an in-person chat with their President Tom Hinton — who is quite pleased with the good news. A lot of hard work now rewarded.We asked him how credit unions and consumers will benefit from this status, what the NCUA review process was like, and how this decision will help other associations wanting to work with credit unions. Many thanks to Tom and his ACC crew for taking time to chat with us. Enjoy!Visit:americanconsumercouncil.org continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


Giannis Antetokounmpo thanked for putting Khris Middleton on ‘Sports Illustrated’ cover

first_imgGiannis Antetokounmpo was surprised to learn he is on the cover of the April 8, 2019 issue of “Sports Illustrated,” when he found out from an unlikely source.Bucks teammate Khris Middleton broke the news by thanking him, because Middleton is featured in the background of the cover photo. “I just found out from Khris. … he’s in the background,” Antetokounmpo told reporters Wednesday. “(Khris) walked in and he said, ‘Thank you for putting me on the Sports Illustrated cover.’ … I was like, ‘What are you talking about?’ He said, ‘You’re on the cover.'”I said, ‘OK, good to know, I didn’t know that.’ … He was happy to be in the background. I was like, ‘Yeah, I got you, bro.'”The SI cover features Antetokounmpo getting ready to posterize a trio of Spurs with a dunk as Middleton looks on in admiration (possibly thinking, “Take cover!)How the @Bucks turned the Greek Freak into the MVP, by @SI_ChrisBallard https://t.co/sNaOsEyh62 pic.twitter.com/B9kBaW3NMo— The Crossover (@TheCrossover) April 3, 2019The cover story, entitled, “Giannis: How to coach a unicorn,” follows first-year Bucks coach Mike Budenholzer’s quest on how to utilize the multi-dimensional Antetokounmpo. Ironically, Budenholzer told Middleton he would have to trim his accustomed role as a shot creator to accommodate Antetokounmpo’s game.“He told me he wanted me to take on a bit of a lesser role, be a team player and not rely on so many tough shots,” Middleton told SI. “And when a coach tells you that the first time you’re meeting them, I feel like you can’t do nothing but respect that.” “Instead of B.S.-ing me and telling me everything I want to hear, which a lot of people tend to do, I’d rather hear the straight truth, whether it’s good or bad.”Whatever they’re doing in Milwaukee, it’s working. The Bucks have an NBA-best 58-20 record. Antetokounmpo is averaging 27.4 points and 12.5 rebound per game and Middleton (18.1 ppg) made his first All-Star game this year.last_img read more