Badgers beat DePaul, snowy conditions to move on to second round

first_imgPlaying in what turned out to be a wintery vortex at the McClimon Soccer Complex Saturday night, fourth-seeded Wisconsin women’s soccer topped the previously undefeated DePaul Blue Demons in a memorable 2-0 match to advance to the second round of the NCAA tournament.With players on both sides slipping left and right, forwards found open space more often than usual, leading to a combined 14 shots in the first half. Leading the charge early for DePaul in the first half was sophomore forward Abby Reed, who had three breakaway shots on-target in the first 45 minutes.Despite Reed beating the Badgers (19-2-2) back line and earning one-on-one opportunities on those occasions, Wisconsin’s senior goalkeeper Genevieve Richard recorded a series of miraculous saves to keep the Badgers in it.Richard noted the importance of making a statement with an early lead, and a big part of that is keeping the shutout intact to support the offense.“I think it helps the team a lot to keep a clean sheet, and it gives us the opportunity to score first and that’s always good,” Richard said. “It just leads to a good momentum, so I’m just glad I did my job.”While DePaul (16-1-4) had trouble finishing their chances in the opening minutes, the Badgers certainly did not. Just 12 minutes into the game, junior midfielder Kinley McNicoll found an open lane into the box, crossing it through the defense to senior forward Cara Walls. Walls then promptly redirected the pass with a header that bounced into the left corner of the goal for the 1-0 lead.The assist was the team-leading 27th point scored by McNicoll, while the goal was number 12 for Walls, also tops on the Badgers.A little while later in the 20th minute, the Badgers got some insurance, upping their lead to 2-0 after redshirt senior forward Kodee Williams found Walls over the middle for a sliding goal through the increasingly snowy field.Looking back at her early goals and the conditions on the field, Walls said the snow really only hindered her ability to fire shots.“I honestly thought the conditions weren’t as bad,” Walls said. “I felt that I was able to pass the ball fine and I don’t think the conditions played as big of a role in the chances of opportunities we created.”For a team that averaged less than one goal allowed per game all season, the Blue Demons found themselves in an early hole, but with plenty of time left to respond. Perhaps due to the snowy field, the Badgers defense appeared more vulnerable than usual, giving up a few costly turnovers in the first half. On one occasion in the closing minutes of the first half, an errant pass back over the middle intended for Richard was intercepted by Reed, who had an open look but barely missed the net wide right.The near miss for Reed epitomized the frustrating night for DePaul’s offense, which finished the night with five shots on-target compared to the Wisconsin’s seven.After a fast-paced first half, the second half showcased far fewer scoring opportunities as the field got increasingly slick and players lost their footing. While the refs appeared to be relatively lenient with calling fouls, there were still plenty to go around, with Wisconsin committing 14 of the 20 total.The big difference maker was Wisconsin’s back line finding some rhythm after a spotty first half. After giving the defense fits in the opening segment, Reed had no on target attempts in the final 45 minutes and was essentially taken out of the game by the Badgers defense, led by senior Alexandra Heller and junior Brianna Stelzer.The Badgers offense successfully maintained control of the ball in the attacking third for the majority of the second half, but couldn’t capitalize. Looking for a dagger in the 84th minute, a sneaky pass to McNicoll in the box looked promising, but DePaul junior goalkeeper Alejandria Godinez stole the ball away before a finishing touch could be made.Sensing the fate of their season in the balance, DePaul began to play desperately in the closing moments. The Blue Demon offense tried several shots from long range, likely hoping for Richard to succumb to the slick field and miss a save. The efforts, however, were too little too late, as the final 2-0 score line punched the Badgers’ ticket to Tallahassee for the second round.After spending two hours in ice and snow, head coach Paula Wilkins said the idea of heading down south for the second round was more than welcoming for her team. That being said, Wilkins emphasized the trip will be business as usual.“I think the players are excited to be in a little bit warmer climate,” Wilkins said. “But, it’s definitely not going to be a vacation for us. They are going to be focused and they have some goals in mind. It will be very exciting.”The Badgers will be on the pitch next against UCF Nov. 21 at the Florida State campus, starting at 3:30 p.m. CT.last_img read more


Meghan Root guides Syracuse to 1st ACC win since 2017 in 2-1 win over Wake Forest

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Georgia Allen took off down the left sideline. The volume of the home crowd rose with her every stride. Her angle on net would be difficult, but that didn’t matter — it was a chance toward the net. Allen ripped a low shot with her left foot toward the back post and Wake Forest goalkeeper Meghan Kennedy deflected it. The ball rolled toward Meghan Root, whose shot was blocked as well. Then, it trickled out to defender Clarke Brown, who sent another shot toward the keeper. But unlike so many similar situations the past two years, the ball kept finding Orange jerseys. This wasn’t the team who hadn’t recorded a shot in two separate games over the last two seasons. Or the one who hadn’t won a conference game in 729 consecutive days. Root slid and got the slightest touch on a shot right. The ball rolled to Kennedy, giving Root time to rise from her knees — just to go right back down to the turf. Shot after shot had come Kennedy’s way in that sequence. But that one slipped past the Wake Forest goalie.Syracuse (3-7-2, 1-3-1 Atlantic Coast) ended its nearly two-year long streak, handing Wake Forest (5-5-3, 0-3-2) a 2-1 loss at SU Soccer Stadium Thursday night. Root matched her goal total from last season in nearly 99 minutes of action, giving the Orange an equalizer in the waning minutes of regulation and scoring the game-winner 15 minutes later. And Syracuse, a team who ended the 2018 season on a 13-game losing streak, ensured that wouldn’t happen again under first-year head coach Nicky Adams.“We were pushing for three points,” Root said. “It wasn’t like ‘Let’s just settle for a tie, get a result and not get scored on.’”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThat game plan throughout Thursday’s game was simple: be aggressive. The Orange committed two fouls early, each time being late challenges from behind caused by being overly aggressive on the ball — a stark contrast from the recent defensive style of play. From the sideline, Adams and assistant coach Kelly Madsen continually urged SU to move without the ball and push the tempo. Senior Sydney Brackett, playing in her first match since Sept. 12, created some of the best scoring chances in the first-half through her own runs, but none of her shots could find the target. SU’s lone shot on goal of the first half was a free kick taken from 30 yards out by Allen that floated harmlessly into the goalkeeper’s grasp. “From start to finish, I thought we were really trying to execute the game plan,” Adams said.Breaking the seal on Syracuse’s conference woes and month-long winless streak looked a lot tougher to achieve when, just over two minutes into the second half, the Demon Deacons scored off their first corner of the half. But unlike previous matches, the Orange didn’t begin to lose their shape behind. The days of “Aw shoot, here we go again” ended last year, Root said. And it showed, when SU started to create the chances it couldn’t find early. True to her word, Root almost netted an equalizer four minutes later. Redshirt freshman Marisa Fischetti slid a ball past the keeper and across the mouth of the open goal, but Root couldn’t redirect before it went out of play. Freshman Kailey Brenner had given up a pair of careless turnovers without much pressure. But then, with 20 minutes of play, the Orange attack started to move toward the corner flag. Brenner initiated the movement with a long run down the near sideline that didn’t award the Orange a corner but pinned the Demon Deacons deep in the defensive end. Two minutes later, Syracuse won its first corner of the match. Then, it got another 30 seconds later. And another eight minutes after that. With each set piece, more home fans seemed to stamp their feet on the bleachers.“We have a brilliant support system here,” Allen said afterward. “Every time we win a corner our bench and our support system are pushing us on.”In the 84th minute, Syracuse would finally get its breakthrough. A cross played in from the far sideline by Brenner glanced off the head of defender Taylor and, much like the game-winner, right to the feet of Root. “It just fell there and I just focused on keeping it low and on target and it went in,” Root said, “So, that’s good.”The Syracuse fans roared, and maintained that intensity through the second-half whistle. Syracuse rode its momentum into the first sudden-death overtime period, and four minutes later, the 99th-minute, four-shot sequence ended in Root’s second goal. As Wake Forest defenders sprawled out on the pitch, the entire Orange roster — injured or not — mobbed Root in the six-yard box. Parents were jumping and hugging. Members of the SU men’s soccer team began chanting, “Ole.” Adams remained on the sideline, soaking in the pandemonium. “We’re trying to change the brand image of this program,” Adams said. “And if anybody’s watching how hard this team is fighting, it’s going to be exciting for the future of Syracuse.”  Comments Published on October 11, 2019 at 12:32 am Contact Tim: tnolan@syr.edulast_img read more


Lakers’ D’Angelo Russell already has Kobe Bryant’s trust

first_imgHONOLULU >> The restlessness overwhelmed D’Angelo Russell, prompting the Lakers rookie point guard to toss and turn before waking up at an ungodly hour before the first day of training camp. Russell could not wait for his workout, so he could break a sweat, build a rhythm and impress an influential and demanding teammate. But Kobe Bryant already beat him to the punch. The Lakers’ star already completed his own before anyone else. “He’s going to push you. So you have to be one of those guys that will compete,” Russell said. “To build a trust with a guy like that, you need to be a winner.” Russell also acknowledged feeling starstruck when he completed a three-man weave drill during his first training camp practice with Bryant. “You try to keep it off your mind that this guy is right beside you,” Russell said of Bryant. “That’s something you have to get past. If you want to be the best, we have to look at him as a mentor and not look at him as a fan.”Russell acknowledged that dynamic could “definitely” make him feel more tentative playing with Bryant, knowing both his star power and thirst to score. “He told me he likes to shoot the ball so if I get it to him, it’s his job to finish it,” Russell said in obvious understatement. “Just knowing where he likes the ball and where he likes to score from, being the point guard, you’ll get a bigger challenge off the bat.” But the Lakers argue Russell will handle that challenge just fine. One, Scott, Bryant and Julius Randle have praised Russell’s on-court poise. So much that Scott likened it to Clippers guard Chris Paul, the eight-time NBA All-Star whom Scott coached in New Orleans from 2004 to 2009. Russell maintained the same stoic demeanor during portions of Wednesday’s full-court scrimmage when he made pinpoint passes as he did when Lakers forward Nick Young talked trash after scoring on him. “Nick always talks,” Scott said. “D’Angelo is a very low-key guy. You don’t see him get too hyped up about things. He’s pretty much on an even keel.”Two, Scott has instructed Russell, Bryant, Randle and Jordan Clarkson to maximize fast-break opportunities by assuming ball-handling duties after rebounding the ball. In a few minutes of Wednesday’s half-four scrimmage that was open to reporters, Bryant played at small forward and neither touched nor shot the ball once. “I don’t think it matters man. You play the flow of the game and see what comes,” Bryant said. “I don’t have to handle the ball at all. That leaves more time to catch and shoot. With D’Angelo and Jordan, these guys can handle the ball, make incredible decisions and make plays. It makes it a lot easier.”Third, Bryant circled back on Russell’s quest for self-improvement. Russell asked for the Lakers to place his locker next to Bryant so he could easily ask him questions. Russell has already asked Bryant for tips to maximize his NBA longevity. And Russell has emulated Bryant’s approach on arriving to the gym early.Does that make Bryant feel more inclined to want to help Russell?“Absolutely,” Bryant said. “When guys have that same passion and desire for it, it makes you more willing to open up. When they’re here early and shooting late, you can tell when that passion is there and you can tell when they think it’s a job.”That explains why Bryant has saddled up to Russell after each practice. They talk. They laugh. They embrace. The makings of a potentially fruitful partnership has just started. The Lakers completed two days of training camp at Stan Sheriff Center, too small of a sample size to offer any conclusions on whether Russell will fit that description for the 2015-16 NBA season. Yet, the Lakers feel convinced their No. 2 pick is a winner after falling in love with his confidence and playmaking. Bryant also already likes what he sees. “He has my trust already because he’s a gym rat,” Bryant said. “He loves playing the game. I trust that whatever challenges are presented to him, he’ll figure them out.”There could be plenty. After averaging only 11.8 points on 37.7 percent, 3.5 turnovers and 3.5 assists in summer league play, Russell has to prove he can translate his outside shooting and playmaking to the NBA. He has admitted a learning curve in Byron Scott’s Princeton-based offense. center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more


The St. Louis Blues are the 2019 Stanley Cup champions and we’re just as surprised as you

first_imgThe St. Louis Blues are  the 2019 Stanley Cup  champions. I repeat, the St. Louis Blues are  the 2019 Stanley Cup   champions — and, just as we were on March 29 when they clinched a playoff spot, we’re a little surprised. June 12The Blues lifted the Cup for the first time after getting that fourth win, a 4-1 Game 7 triumph over the Bruins in Boston, the city where Bobby Orr broke the franchise’s young hearts 49 years earlier. This time, St. Louis took a 2-0 lead in the first period and never let the B’s get back into the contest. They iced the title with two more goals in the third.Every season has a Cinderella team, a team with an amazing story. Worst-to-first St. Louis was the team this year. The glass slipper fits.SN’s Tom Gatto contributed to this report. Craig Berube on clinching a playoff spot: “It’s a big thing, where we were and where we are now, but we’re not finished.” #stlblues pic.twitter.com/87ImXARqO6— x – St. Louis Blues (@StLouisBlues) March 30, 2019Why, you may ask?center_img Well, before games were played Jan. 3 — yes, Jan. 3, 2019 — the team from Missouri was last in the NHL and 11 points behind the Anaheim Ducks for the last wild-card spot in the Western Conference. Now, St. Louis is bringing Cup back to its home state.MORE: Get Blues championship gearWhat a long strange trip this season has been for the Blues:Nov. 20Before we can even start with how this happened, we need to go all the way back to November with the firing of coach Mike Yeo and the promotion of associate Craig Berube . “Chief” took over a team that was 7-9-3.At the time, people thought Joel Quenneville, who was let go by the Chicago Blackhawks two weeks earlier, would be tapped, given that he had previously coached the Blues for parts of eight seasons (1996-2004). Nope.  Quenneville was enjoying tailgating with Bears fans and looked content to be off the bench, so Berube was chosen to fill in and finish out what was looking like a lost season.Dec. 10If things couldn’t get any worse for St. Louis, teammates fought at practice. Not a good look for a team well outside the playoff race and losers of eight of their last 11. Robert Bortuzzo and Zach Sanford dropped the gloves at #STLBlues practice today.(via @Avery_188 ) pic.twitter.com/7rLxpies6g— Sporting News Canada (@sportingnewsca) December 10, 2018Robert Bortuzzo, who fought Zach Sanford, reflected on the incident March 25 with Blues radio analyst Joey Vitale on “The Late Shift””It’s something that happens in our game. It’s nothing I’m proud of and something that I don’t want to be doing,” he said. “But it had nothing to do with (Sanford). We’re good friends and it was just a sequence of events that led to something unfortunate.”Jan. 3As stated above, the season was looking grim on this date. Before games started that Thursday night, St. Louis was 15-18-4 (34 points) with a minus-21 goal differential and dead last in the league.That night, the Blues went out and beat the reigning Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals 5-2. Sure, one game doesn’t turn the tide, but maybe Bortuzzo dropping the gloves with Tom Wilson — who was suspended earlier in the season for 14 games for a dirty hit on Oskar Sundqvist  — played a role. MORE:  How ‘Play Gloria’ became the Blues’ rallying cryJan. 5St. Louis recalled 25-year-old goaltender Jordan Binnington from San Antonio (AHL). Two days later, he made his first start of the season and his career. The rest has been history.Beginning with his 3-0 shutout of the Philadelphia Flyers on Jan. 7, the 2011 draft pick has posted a 21-5-1 record with an impressive 1.78 goals-against average and .932 save percentage.Jordan Binnington of the @StLouisBlues became the 35th goaltender in League history to register a shutout in his first career NHL start and the eighth to do so in the past 15 years. #NHLStats pic.twitter.com/XipaVcRYIQ— NHL Public Relations (@PR_NHL) January 8, 2019Jordan Binnington notched his first NHL start and shutout on the same day he was announced @theAHL player of the week.You could say last week was pretty good to him 👍 pic.twitter.com/R4hUT5UHav— San Antonio Rampage (@sarampage) January 10, 2019Binnington, who eventually took over the No. 1 spot from Jake Allen, has had his name thrown into the Calder Trophy and, dare we say, Vezina Trophy debates. He has earned Player of the Week honors twice this season (second star on Jan. 14; first star on Feb. 11) and was the NHL’s Rookie of the Month for February.Jan. 23-Feb. 19Twenty-eight days. In just 28 calendar days, the Blues changed their season.After losing 4-3 to the Kings on Jan. 21, St. Louis went on a tear, winning a franchise-record 11 consecutive games. After going from a game under. 500 (21-22-5) to 10 games over (32-22-5), the Blues were suddenly in a playoff spot and poised to make the postseason for the 42nd time in franchise history. The streak included wins over the Tampa Bay Lightning (1-0 in overtime) and Toronto Maple Leafs (3-2 in overtime) and back-to-back victories over the Nashville Predators (3-2 in regulation and 5-4 in overtime), who, as of now, look to be the Blues’ first-round opponent in the playoffs.Over the course of those 11 games, St. Louis went 493 minutes and 42 seconds without trailing. Rookie sensation Binnington won nine in a row — tied for fifth-most by a rookie netminder in NHL history. The team’s points leader, Ryan O’Reilly, scored 12 points. Vladimir Tarasenko notched an awe-inspiring 20 points (10 goals, 10 assists). Tarasenko, whose name was in the trade rumor mill in the beginning of January , was named the NHL’s third star of the month for February.March 7Things were looking up even more when Brayden Schenn was activated March 6 from injured reserve after missing the previous six games with an upper-body injury. Just a day later, things took a turn and the Cinderella season looked to be in peril.Leading goal-scorer Tarasenko suffered an upper-body injury during a 4-0 victory over the Los Angeles Kings in which he scored the 28th goal of his season. The team announced he would be out for 10 days . The Blues went 1-2-2 in the five games he missed and were outscored 13-11, with five of the team’s goals coming in the lone victory, 5-1 over the Pittsburgh Penguins.March 19The Blues got healthy. Tarasenko returned, and as if in direct correlation, the team won four in a row, including victories over the Lightning and the Vegas Golden Knights. Just three nights before Tarasenko’s return, David Perron returned to the lineup after missing 24 games with an upper-body injury. In the seven games since his return, he has seven points (four goals, three assists). He also closed out a remarkable streak in his fourth game back, March 21 against the Detroit Red Wings.David Perron recorded the fourth instance in @StLouisBlues franchise history of a player recording at least one point in 17 consecutive appearances, joining Brett Hull (25 GP in 1991-92, 20 GP in 1989-90) and Blake Dunlop (19 GP in 1981-82). #NHLStats #DETvsSTL pic.twitter.com/yvSRpeYMU2— NHL Public Relations (@PR_NHL) March 22, 2019March 29Welcome to the 2019 Stanley Cup playoffs, St. Louis! You did it! WE’RE IN!!!! https://t.co/aAjs9kXe6a #stlblues pic.twitter.com/eYrWzpq7Om— x – St. Louis Blues (@StLouisBlues) March 30, 2019Despite losing to the New York Rangers on March 29, the Blues clinched when the Arizona Coyotes lost to the Colorado Avalanche in a shootout.Since that key Jan. 3 date, St. Louis went 30-10-5 to close out the regular season and become the seventh team since expansion in 1967 (which was also when the Blues joined the NHL) to make the postseason after being in last place after New Year’s Day. Those 30 wins were also the second-most in the NHL since Jan. 1.May 21It took 49 years — or exactly 17,908 days since May 10, 1970 — but the St. Louis Blues are back in the Stanley Cup Final. As it so hapens, the last franchise they faced in the Stanley Cup Final is the same one they’ll face this time — the Boston Bruins. The moment that’s a half-century in the making! pic.twitter.com/Ws9k3WrYxV— St. Louis Blues (@StLouisBlues) May 22, 2019After defeating the Winnipeg Jets in six games, the Dallas Stars in seven and the San Jose Sharks in six in the West playoffs, the Blues are just four wins away from the first Stanley Cup championship in franchise history. last_img read more


Job Vacancies: Donegal engineering company seeks staff

first_imgJob Vacancies: JC Engineering in Cloghan, Co. Donegal are looking to recruit.JC Engineering Ltd specialises in designing and fabricating and fitting mild steel and stainless steel, offering a range of metal fabrication and cladding services for commercial, industrial and agricultural sectors.Welder/FabricatorJC Engineering have a vacancy for a Welder/Fabricator, the ideal candidate must be reliable, hard-working and a full clean driving licence is an advantage. Experience is essential, Safe pass is required and the role will be mainly site based.Must be able to read drawings and work as part of a team as well as on own initiative.Hourly Rate will be dependent on experience.Apprentice welderWe also have a vacancy for an apprentice welder mainly based at our workshop in Cloghan, the ideal candidate will be a motivated, hard-working and willing to learn. To applyIf you feel you are suitable to either position please send your CV to sales@jce.ie, clearly stating which job you are applying for.If you have any queries call the office on 0749133225Job Vacancies: Donegal engineering company seeks staff was last modified: July 12th, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:JC EngineeringWelderlast_img read more


2 get prison in slaying

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card Sentencing for co-defendant Jose Medina, 25, who was accused of being the gunman, was postponed until Thursday because his attorney was at another trial. Barba’s mother, grandmother and sister attended the sentencing but did not make a statement, Osorio said. A fourth defendant, Jason Falcon, 26, was acquitted. Marron, Medina, and Vallejo were each also convicted of attempted murder in connection with a female passenger in Barba’s car, and jurors also found true gang and gun allegations against the three defendants. The victim and the three convicted defendants were gang members, but there was no evidence that Falcon was a gang member, prosecutors said. Two men have been sentenced to 50 years to life in prison in the gang-related slaying of a teenager who was gunned down in Lake Los Angeles as he drove away from a friend’s house. Eighteen-year-old Ernesto Barba was shot and killed in January 2004 after a fight with a group of men who had been standing outside a house where he went to retrieve a music CD. George Marron and Raymond Vallejo, both 24, were each convicted in November of first-degree murder by a Los Angeles Superior Court jury. “Because they chose to involve themselves in a gang fight resulting in the shooting death of the victim, both defendants will not be eligible for their first parole hearing until they are about 72 years old,” Deputy District Attorney Benny Osorio said after Friday’s sentencing. Barba had gone to a friend’s house in the 40500 block of 174th Street East early Jan. 3 to pick up the CD when he was confronted by the defendants, who challenged him by asking, “Where are you from?” prosecutors said. He responded with a gang name, the defendants replied with their gang affiliation, and a fight ensued, prosecutors said. Barba got into his car and drove off while Medina ran into the middle of the street and fired 13 shots. Barba’s car was found crashed two blocks away, and the victim had been shot in the back of the head, prosecutors said. Falcon held back one of the witnesses for several seconds while he was trying to help Barba, prosecutors said. Barba was a student at Desert Sands Continuation High School but had been preparing to start a new job in the next week. Medina was arrested in February 2004 in Texas after investigators learned he might have left California and alerted other police agencies around the country. The others were arrested in Lake Los Angeles in the two months after the killing. Karen Maeshiro, (661) 267-5744 karen.maeshiro@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more