The Osasuna manager says he did not draw up Flefield’s contract

first_imgThe former financial director and current manager of Osasuna, Ángel Ardanaz, has denied that it was he who prepared the contract for the Flefield company with which the club justified the cash mismatch of 1.4 million euros at the end of the 2013/2014 season , ensuring that it seemed “strange” that this payment was made per box.Ardanaz has testified at the trial against six former directors of Osasuna, three former Betis players and two real estate agents accused of crimes of misappropriation, corporate, false business document, falsification of annual accounts and sports corruption for the supposed match size.During your statement He stressed that former Angel Vizcay “has lied” by ensuring that it was he who drew up this contract and He indicated in this regard that at the time this document was delivered to the auditor, Adolfo Suárez, he was on vacation.He pointed out that the first time he saw this contract was when he was requested in a future audit, already after Vizcay left, and that he located it on the former manager’s computer, ensuring that he had never accessed this equipment before and this time he did it with a password that he had left behind. Regarding these payments, he said he found it “strange” to be made by cash and that the problem of lack of justification be solved in a few days, although he explained that He did not ask for explanations because there were documents prior to his arrival at the club that he did not know and at no time thought that the bills could be false. Regarding a refund of 125,000 euros signed by him and Vizcay, he said that he explained that he was destined to repay a loan and that the then president, Javier Zabaleta, was aware of it, although he did not verify it.As noted, It was not until the completion of the audit, in June 2014, when he became aware of this cash mismatch of 1.4 million euros, which meant that “or there were no supporting documents or money was missing.”This matter, he indicated, was discussed at the meeting held in August at the request of the auditor Adolfo Suárez between the management team and the Board of Directors, also coming himself, the then accountant, Tomás López and the lawyer Miguel Martínez de Lecea.As he explained, The main theme of this meeting was the viability of the club and if Osasuna was to make a bankruptcy proceedings or a payment for their assets, although the auditor stated that there was a mismatch in the accounts, asking the president to leave the room to discuss the matter privately.At this time, he recalled, former manager Ángel Vizcay set out to explain what had happened with that money, but Luis Ibero told him that “he did not want explanations” but a solution, since the Board, which had recently entered Osasuna, did not He had intervened in the problem.Ardanaz said that when he went to work in the club in accounting “there was a tremendous traffic jam” and noted that only “simple bank movements” were counted but “the rest was not done.”In this sense, He made reference to the fact that at the end of the accounting year Social Security was unpaid and there were complaints from players for non-payments, two issues on which, he said, focused their efforts to avoid relegation to Second B, as this put the continuity of the club in serious danger.last_img read more


House Probes NTAL Protests

first_imgThe Plenary of the House of Representatives has empowered the Committees on Education and Judiciary to investigate complaints from the National Teachers Association of Liberia (NTAL), including the stalemate between the NTAL and the Ministry of Education. The two committees, chaired by Representatives Dr. Isaac Roland and Worlea Saywah Dunah of Maryland and Nimba, respectively, are expected to jointly probe and report to Plenary, on or before Tuesday, Nov. 15.The decision was reached yesterday, Tuesday, November 8, on the first day of the 2nd Extraordinary Session.The longstanding conflict between the NTAL and the Education Ministry emerged when the Ministry decided to outsource a portion of the country’s Public Primary School system to Bridge International Academies and other private providers.The NTAL accused Education Minister George Werner and other Ministry officials of constant violations of the 1986 Liberian Constitution, the Education Law and human rights by privatizing the education system and dismissing teachers and the leaderships of teachers’ unions in Margibi and Montserrado counties, among others.The Ministry of Education, on the other hand, accused the dismissed teachers and education workers of violating the country’s labor law and the Civil Service Standing Orders.In the NTAL’s formal complaint to the House of Representatives, which was read yesterday, it spoke of provocations and violations of their rights that need urgent intervention in order to maintain the country’s fragile peace.“As a matter of information, the differences between the Education Ministry and the NTAL started when the Ministry decided to outsource portion of our Public Primary School system to profit-making providers such as Bridge International Academies and other private providers including BRAC, an agricultural NGO, Omega, a Ghanaian firm, and many others,” the NTAL noted.The House’s Plenary also mandated the Committees on Rules, Order and Administration and Youth and Sports to investigate the complaints from the ECOWAS Civil Society Movement of Liberia (ECSOMOL) against the Ministry of Youth and Sports for allegedly sabotaging ECOWAS programs and projects in the country. The youth group accused Youth and Sports Minister Saah Charles N’Tow and Deputy Minister for Youth Development Lance Gonyon.The Committee on Rules, Order and Administration is chaired Grand Bassa lawmaker J. Byron Brown, while the Youth and Sports Committee is headed by J. Gabriel Nyenkan. There was no timeline attached for the Committee to report to Plenary. This is the first task by each of the four committees since they were overhauled by the new leadership of Speaker J. Emmanuel Nuquay and Deputy Speaker Hans M. Barchue.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more