Meghan Root guides Syracuse to 1st ACC win since 2017 in 2-1 win over Wake Forest

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Georgia Allen took off down the left sideline. The volume of the home crowd rose with her every stride. Her angle on net would be difficult, but that didn’t matter — it was a chance toward the net. Allen ripped a low shot with her left foot toward the back post and Wake Forest goalkeeper Meghan Kennedy deflected it. The ball rolled toward Meghan Root, whose shot was blocked as well. Then, it trickled out to defender Clarke Brown, who sent another shot toward the keeper. But unlike so many similar situations the past two years, the ball kept finding Orange jerseys. This wasn’t the team who hadn’t recorded a shot in two separate games over the last two seasons. Or the one who hadn’t won a conference game in 729 consecutive days. Root slid and got the slightest touch on a shot right. The ball rolled to Kennedy, giving Root time to rise from her knees — just to go right back down to the turf. Shot after shot had come Kennedy’s way in that sequence. But that one slipped past the Wake Forest goalie.Syracuse (3-7-2, 1-3-1 Atlantic Coast) ended its nearly two-year long streak, handing Wake Forest (5-5-3, 0-3-2) a 2-1 loss at SU Soccer Stadium Thursday night. Root matched her goal total from last season in nearly 99 minutes of action, giving the Orange an equalizer in the waning minutes of regulation and scoring the game-winner 15 minutes later. And Syracuse, a team who ended the 2018 season on a 13-game losing streak, ensured that wouldn’t happen again under first-year head coach Nicky Adams.“We were pushing for three points,” Root said. “It wasn’t like ‘Let’s just settle for a tie, get a result and not get scored on.’”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThat game plan throughout Thursday’s game was simple: be aggressive. The Orange committed two fouls early, each time being late challenges from behind caused by being overly aggressive on the ball — a stark contrast from the recent defensive style of play. From the sideline, Adams and assistant coach Kelly Madsen continually urged SU to move without the ball and push the tempo. Senior Sydney Brackett, playing in her first match since Sept. 12, created some of the best scoring chances in the first-half through her own runs, but none of her shots could find the target. SU’s lone shot on goal of the first half was a free kick taken from 30 yards out by Allen that floated harmlessly into the goalkeeper’s grasp. “From start to finish, I thought we were really trying to execute the game plan,” Adams said.Breaking the seal on Syracuse’s conference woes and month-long winless streak looked a lot tougher to achieve when, just over two minutes into the second half, the Demon Deacons scored off their first corner of the half. But unlike previous matches, the Orange didn’t begin to lose their shape behind. The days of “Aw shoot, here we go again” ended last year, Root said. And it showed, when SU started to create the chances it couldn’t find early. True to her word, Root almost netted an equalizer four minutes later. Redshirt freshman Marisa Fischetti slid a ball past the keeper and across the mouth of the open goal, but Root couldn’t redirect before it went out of play. Freshman Kailey Brenner had given up a pair of careless turnovers without much pressure. But then, with 20 minutes of play, the Orange attack started to move toward the corner flag. Brenner initiated the movement with a long run down the near sideline that didn’t award the Orange a corner but pinned the Demon Deacons deep in the defensive end. Two minutes later, Syracuse won its first corner of the match. Then, it got another 30 seconds later. And another eight minutes after that. With each set piece, more home fans seemed to stamp their feet on the bleachers.“We have a brilliant support system here,” Allen said afterward. “Every time we win a corner our bench and our support system are pushing us on.”In the 84th minute, Syracuse would finally get its breakthrough. A cross played in from the far sideline by Brenner glanced off the head of defender Taylor and, much like the game-winner, right to the feet of Root. “It just fell there and I just focused on keeping it low and on target and it went in,” Root said, “So, that’s good.”The Syracuse fans roared, and maintained that intensity through the second-half whistle. Syracuse rode its momentum into the first sudden-death overtime period, and four minutes later, the 99th-minute, four-shot sequence ended in Root’s second goal. As Wake Forest defenders sprawled out on the pitch, the entire Orange roster — injured or not — mobbed Root in the six-yard box. Parents were jumping and hugging. Members of the SU men’s soccer team began chanting, “Ole.” Adams remained on the sideline, soaking in the pandemonium. “We’re trying to change the brand image of this program,” Adams said. “And if anybody’s watching how hard this team is fighting, it’s going to be exciting for the future of Syracuse.”  Comments Published on October 11, 2019 at 12:32 am Contact Tim: tnolan@syr.edulast_img read more


U.S. Builds 3rd Ebola Treatment Center in Bassa

first_imgIn support of the fight against the deadly Ebola virus in Liberia, the United States Government, through the U. S. Army Engineers, has completed its third Ebola Treatment Unit in Buchanan, Grand Bassa County.Speaking at the tour of the new facility last Friday, Major General Gary Volesky, commander of the 101st Airborne Division, explained that, this is the first Ebola treatment unit built completely by the U.S. Army Engineers to help in caring for Ebola patients.Maj. Gen. Volesky explained that the facility has the capacity of 100 beds.  The construction lasted 23 days with the materials being procured both locally and abroad.He expressed gratitude to the Own Your Own community for their collaboration with the U.S. Army and support in the construction of the Ebola treatment unit.According to Maj. Gen. Volesky, “Three of the Ebola treatment units have been completed, including Bomi, Tubmanburg city, Sinje in  Grand Cape Mount, and this one in Buchanan,  Grand Bassa.  A total of 17 Ebola units are expected to be built across Liberia.”Also speaking, the Head of Ebola Disaster Assistant Response Team (DART) from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Mia Beers, said they are currently working to ensure the first 15 Ebola treatment units are built across Liberia. She explained that due to the nature of the epidemic in Liberia, the U.S. Government is focusing on building the first 15 units but will make sure that ETUs are in all of the counties to support the fight against Ebola.“We want to make sure that these Ebola treatment units are built in the 15 counties to help access rural areas and make sure that we follow  the transmission of the outbreak in all parts of Liberia and be able to fight it.”Ms. Beers said they are working with the Government of Liberia,  especially with the new strategies of fighting Ebola with emphasis on rural areas on how to put in place mechanisms to  contain the virus.She further explained that the most important thing is to have a rapid team out there working with county officials to ensure that every county can respond as quickly as possible to any outbreak in the area.She continued, “We have different ETU plans in the Southeast, including Fish Town, Greenville, River Cess, most importantly to look at health strategizes in the various counties in the fight against Ebola.  Rapid teams can really help us in the process. We are chasing after the suspected cases also in the southeastern areas, because they are hard to reach. “We are getting the rapid team setups from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the various county officials, and other partners as well as air transport to handle these cases.”The Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL), Brig/Gen Daniel Ziankahn, said they are working in collaboration with the U.S. Army in supporting the fight against the Ebola virus, including the construction of Ebola Treatment Units across Liberia.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more


Home growth robust in ’05

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake “The slowdown in November will give builders an opportunity to clear out standing inventory,” he said. Multifamily starts jumped 34.1 percent from October to 4,616 permits, but activity was off 36.1 percent from a year ago. The report also showed that: In the Los Angeles/Long Beach area, builders were issued 851 single-family permits, down 19.2 percent from a year ago and up 3.3 percent from October. Permits were issued for 1,471 multifamily units, down 25.7 percent from a year ago and up 35.1 percent from October. For the year’s first 11 months, 23,510 residential permits have been issued, 1.4 percent fewer than a year ago. New home construction activity in California during November nearly matched its 2004 level, and while it took a big drop from October, this year should end up just as robust as the last, an industry tracker said Tuesday. Sinking affordability, rising construction materials costs and workers being drawn to the Gulf Coast resurrection effort could impact the state’s home-building sector next year. Last month, builders pulled 14,021 permits for houses and apartment and condominium units, 23.6 percent fewer than a year ago and 5.3 percent under October’s level, said the Sacramento-based California Building Industry Association. In November, builders were issued 9,405 permits for single-family homes, down 18 percent from last year and down 17.2 percent from last month. Nevin notes that in the year’s first 11 months, permits were issued for 145,119 single-family houses, about 5,000 more than a year ago. The Inland Empire continues to be the state’s strongest home-building area. So far this year, there have been 47,308 housing permits issued in Riverside and San Bernardino counties, down an annual 2.2 percent. Robert Rivinius, the association’s president and chief executive officer, said that while production has been strong over the past several years, it hasn’t caught up with demand. And he’s concerned that low affordability rates in most communities will further limit new construction. Rivinius said it is time for the Legislature and local agencies to come up with plans to reduce fees. Jack Kyser, chief economist at the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp., agrees. Builders in the Inland Empire face “onerous” fees, he said, and those in some of the outlying areas of the county sometimes are confronted by anti-development groups. “You are at the point where affordability is a problem,” Kyser said. “We’ve had enough conferences. It’s time to get down to the business of solving it.” Gregory J. Wilcox, (818) 713-3743 greg.wilcox@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more