WATCH: Film follows Mary T of Castle Grove’s success story after Hall of Fame honour

first_imgMary T Sweeney of Castle Grove has shared her life story in a powerful video after receiving the Lifetime Achievement award from the Letterkenny Chamber of Commerce.The lady of Castle Grove Country House Hotel Mary T was the recipient of the highly coveted Hall of Fame Award at the Letterkenny Business Awards 2017.She shared her extraordinary story of ambition, hard work and success on camera to commemorate the honour, which you can watch below: Video by DNK Media Productions – www.dnkmedia.ie | www.facebook.com/dnkmediaThe special interview with Mary T recalls her Donegal story, how she developed her admirable work ethic through farming and how she refined her career in hospitality across Cork, Dublin and Donegal.The video charts Mary T’s life as she met and married her husband Raymond and had five children. In 1989 they bought Castle Grove Country House outside Letterkenny, and it became one of her great loves. She recalls how she built the house up from a B&B to the highly-regarded venue that she is so proud of today. Letterkenny Business Awards 2017A week on from earning the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Letterkenny Chamber of Commerce, the matriarch is back doing what she does best and making sure guests feel at home at Castle Grove.“People have been wonderful, coming from all over wishing me well and saying congratulations. It’s overwhelming really, because I feel that I was just doing what I enjoyed doing and I was developing a good customer base who are very loyal.“Every single person who came through the door was appreciated and was acknowledged as if it was a visitor to our home,” she told Donegal Woman.Mary T considers her achievement as a triumph for all the staff and family at Castle Grove:“As the saying goes – ‘No man is an island, you’re only as good as your loyal team’. We have had the pleasure of having some of our team for 20 years or more. A lot of credit goes to their hard work and loyalty,” Mary T said.She paid tribute to her friends in farming who have always supported her over the years. “Some of my best friend and most loyal patrons today were people who introduced me all over the county and accepted me with open arms,” Mary T said.Castle Grove is added to the 2018 Blue BookIt has been a month of major milestones for Mary T as Castle Grove was added to the elite Blue Book collection for 2018.Ireland’s Blue Book recognises the finest Irish country house hotels, historic manor houses, castles and restaurants. Just three venues in Donegal are part of the association. Mary T considered this addition as a pinnacle of success of her career.“The Blue Book was the ultimate goal and we are really looking forward to embracing it,” Mary T said. Castle GroveMary’s daughter Karoline also acknowledged the hard-working team behind the residence.“We are the next generation helping mum, who is still the Ambassador. We are nothing without mum, but without our team, we could never have done it. They care about Castle Grove,” Karoline told Donegal Woman.“We are also grateful for our customers’ support – we have customers coming here for 25 years. Those people, and other people they send here, are helping us along the way and they have become family friends,” Karoline said.Christmas celebrations are the next event in store for Castle Grove, where they will be looking back at a momentous year and looking ahead to exciting times to come in 2018.WATCH: Film follows Mary T of Castle Grove’s success story after Hall of Fame honour was last modified: November 22nd, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:castle grove country house hotelHall of FameLetterkenny Chamber of Commercelifetime achievementmary t sweeneylast_img read more


Flooding concerns raised over bridge in Castlefinn

first_imgConcern has been expressed today (Sat) over a bridge in Castlefinn that is regularly under the strain of flash flooding.Councillor Gary Doherty urged motorists crossing the bridge to take care when passing.The Donegal Councillor wrote on Facebook: “Castlefinn Bridge is only just passable at the moment with extreme care, however despite the rain easing off the river is still rising.” Flooding concerns raised over bridge in Castlefinn was last modified: August 31st, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more


Bone Structure Matches Animal Size

first_imgThe bigger the animal, the more weight it has to carry.  How can large animals maintain strong bones without making them heavier?  It turns out all animals have struts in their bones called trabeculae, but the larger the animal, the fewer, stronger, and farther apart are the struts.  This new finding is leading to ideas that may improve your car.    PhysOrg reported on a team from Imperial College London and the Royal Veterinary College that was curious about bone structure in various mammals.  Looking at femurs from 90 different species of mammals, reptiles and birds, they “found that trabeculae, typically found near joints, have different geometry depending on the size of the species.”  This was news to them.  Dr. Michael Doube at Imperial College London said,“Scientists had not previously known that the structure of trabeculae varied, or scaled up, depending on the size of the animal.  We assumed that trabeculae would be important in supporting the weight of larger creatures such as Asian elephants, which can weigh more than three tonnes.  However, we were surprised to find that animals that have comparatively lighter loads, such as the Etruscan shrew, weighing three grams, also has trabeculae supporting its tiny body.  Our study is helping us to see how the remarkable geometry of trabeculae supports loads in all creatures, no matter how big or small they are.”In addition, they found that the mass of bone per unit volume was roughly constant in big and small animals, but “the trabeculae in bigger animals were thicker, further apart and less numerous.”    Moving from observation to explanation, they reasoned that “the big trabecular struts inside the bones of larger animals help to support their heavier load without the need for thicker and denser bones.  Using this structure saves valuable energy in larger animals because they do not have to grow, maintain and carry extra bone tissue around with them.”  Neat idea.  From explanation they moved to application:The scientists say new structural materials could be developed, which are inspired by geometry inside femurs.  These materials would contain a lattice work of stiff foam that would be reinforced in certain areas, depending on the load being exerted on that particular section.  This type of material could be used in car bodywork, only being reinforced in areas of the car where loads are heaviest.  This could make cars lighter and more fuel efficient.A capital idea, worthy of stimulus by some entrepreneur.  The scientists delved deeper into their biomimetic hunch and generated 200 computer models of “virtual bones,” giving their open-source code, named BoneJ, to anyone who wants to download it (see BoneJ.org).  About 1500 downloads from 250 institutes and organizations have taken a look at it.  Some of them might have great ideas for lightweight aircraft and automobiles.  Think of the slogans: Tough as an elephant or Built to fly like a bird.    Now that they understand bone structure better, the team wants to study animal motion and joints “to understand the relationship between how animals walk and bone structure.”  What might come of that?  Understanding bone deformities, for one thing; reconstructing the movement patterns of extinct species, for another.  Their research was published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.Bravo!  Great science with no evolution!  We wish to praise researchers who get the best aspects of science right: observation, explanation, and application to help improve our lives.  Sir Francis Bacon stressed that you will know good science (like good character) by its fruits.  Biomimetics again shows how a design-focused science not only leads to understanding, but to practical benefits.    We called this “design-focused science” but lest Eugenie and Rick Dawk have a fit, there was no need to mention God, Creator, or religion in this project.  There was, however, an unspoken assumption that animal bones are well designed for what they do (go back and read the quotes for clues).  Was that a science-stopper?  Clearly not.    It would have been so tempting for the reporter to toss in the Darwin fogma, claiming that animals evolved these amazing optimal solutions by blind chance.  But fogma not only blinds, it stinks.  Who needs useless smoke?  Who needs to hear tall tales, like notions that vastly different animals all converged on the same solution to optimize strength per unit mass?  Clear the air, stick to the observations, and make the theory do something helpful.  Observation – explanation – application: that is classical science.  It worked for Faraday, it’s fair for our-a-day. (Visited 37 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


American Agri-Women Partners with Ohio Corn & Wheat on ‘Drive Across America’

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest American Agri-Women, the nation’s largest coalition of farm, ranch and agri-business women, is celebrating 40 years of advocating for agriculture with its “Drive Across America,” a five-month educational and advocacy tour. Ohio Corn & Wheat, a market development, education and political advocacy group for the state’s grain farmers, is a sponsor of the Drive.Ohio Corn & Wheat works to create opportunities for long-term Ohio corn and small grain grower profitability through two checkoff based organizations and one legislative entity, Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association. The Ohio Corn Checkoff and Ohio Small Grains Checkoff work to develop and expand markets, fund research, and provide education about corn and wheat, respectively. Working with its national counterparts, the National Corn Growers Assn. and the National Assn. of Wheat Growers, the state group works to advocate for supportive public policy and engage with consumer audiences at a grassroots level to ensure a climate for grower success.“Grassroots advocacy is among the best ways to influence change because it focuses on personal connections and shared experiences. We appreciate the work of Ohio Corn & Wheat in influencing policies that promote the future of agriculture. We are so pleased to have them as a sponsor of our Drive Across America,” says AAW President Sue McCrum.“Ohio Corn & Wheat is proud to support the American Agri-Women as they continue to advocate for agriculture and help lead our nation’s agricultural industry,” said John Hoffman, chairman of the Ohio Small Grains Checkoff. “We congratulate them on their 40th anniversary and look forward to their visit to Ohio for this weekend’s Preble County Pork Festival.”McCrum and other AAW leaders and members are driving in a specially wrapped pick-up truck, participating in educational, network and advocacy events hosted by AAW’s more than 50 affiliates. The Drive will finish at the 2015 annual convention in Portland, Maine.last_img read more


World Cup schedule is not a problem for Virat

first_imgThe seemingly unending group stage of the upcoming World Cup has attracted some criticism from players like England’s Kevin Pietersen. But for Virat Kohli, the format is not a problem as it allows the teams to plan and comeback if there are any reversals.Virat Kohli”I feel the format now is better than before. Anyhow, it shouldn’t be a problem. When you are playing well, the format of a tournament shouldn’t matter. In this World Cup, all teams will have the chance to plan for every match and also stage a comeback if there any setbacks,” Virat said here on Thursday. “We are well prepared for the World Cup. Playing at home, there will be pressure but we will try to avoid all the outside pressures.”The one factor, though, which will weigh heavily on the minds of the players, would be the spate of injuries that has plagued Team India with just two weeks left for the mega event to begin. Virat, however, refused to brand it as a lapse in fitness management and said it was just a case of bad luck.”Injuries don’t happen intentionally. With the amount of cricket being played nowadays, injuries are bound to happen. Unfortunately, it happened to us at a very wrong time. Just unlucky for us. The injury management is not bad,” he said.The entire nation is hoping that luck would be on India’s side, more so for Sachin Tendulkar, who many feel would be playing his last World Cup. For Virat, a win would be a great gift for India and Sachin.advertisement”We need to win it for India and Sachin. What he has done on the field for the country, I don’t think anyone ever has or will ever be able to replicate. So it will be great if we can win not only for our fans but also for Sachin.”Virat will take the form of the ODI series in South Africa, where he was the most consistent Indian batsmen and seemed at ease on the pact wickets, to the World Cup. Even though the conditions would be vastly different, the Delhi batsman felt that he would have to make quick adjustments for the sub-continent wickets.”In South Africa, I just played on the merit of the ball. I didn’t make any special adjustments. It’s just that my upright stance and back-foot play helped me on those wickets. But coming to India, the wickets will be different and I will have to make quick adjustments,” the 22-year-old said.Decision reviewThe Indian team has not been a big fan of the Umpire Decision Review System (UDRS) and captain MS Dhoni categorically said he didn’t have full faith in it. But now that the system has been enforced by the ICC for the World Cup, the Indians will have to adapt to it and Virat is confident that the hosts will not be caught off-guard while dealing with it.”We know how the system works. It is going to be the same for everyone and there is no advantage or disadvantage for anyone. Personally, I have no problem with it.”last_img read more