University, police, students react to arrests

first_imgThe second major police raid last weekend resulted in a broken-down door, landed a police officer in the hospital and brought the total number of alcohol-related arrests since students returned to school to nearly 60. The incident, in which students reportedly refused to open the door and one person punched and kicked an officer while resisting arrest, sent 35 people to jail. The recent trend to arrest — rather than cite — students for underage drinking has caught the attention of both students and the University. University spokesman Dennis Brown said the administration is working to address the issue. “We clearly don’t condone underage drinking or gatherings that infringe on the rights of others,” Brown said. “At the same time, the welfare of our students is our highest priority. “We have concerns about the handling of some recent incidents that we are actively addressing through appropriate channels.” Indiana State Excise Police busted a party on Turtle Creek Drive Sunday morning and arrested 32 people for minor consuming alcohol, one person for public intoxication and one person for furnishing alcohol to minors. One person was also arrested for resisting law enforcement, battery to a police officer, disorderly conduct and minor consuming alcohol. Tim Cleveland, excise police commander for the district, said many of those arrested were Notre Dame students, but he could not confirm that all were students. The excise police were in the area of the party because South Bend police asked them to check a location of another party. When officers arrived, the party they had been called for was not occurring, but they discovered the party on Turtle Creek Drive, Cleveland said. “They stumbled across the one at Turtle Creek,” he said. Meanwhile, South Bend police received a call for trespassing at the same party. “There were individuals who were climbing the fence to gain access to the pool, which was closed,” Cleveland said. South Bend and excise police officers were denied access to the apartment and waited for two hours to obtain a search warrant. Once the warrant was obtained, the residents continued to deny officers entry and South Bend police broke down the door. Cleveland said officers decided to arrest rather than issue citations for underage drinking because of the resistance they encountered. “They still didn’t open the door even though they knew we had a search warrant,” he said. “Then when we did gain access into the residence, people were hiding in closets and everywhere else that they could find.” A police officer was injured when one person resisted arrest. He spent most of Sunday at South Bend Memorial Hospital. “He was punched, he was kicked and he did some damage to his knee,” Cleveland said. Cleveland encouraged students to cooperate if they encounter law enforcement officials. While underage drinking is an arrest-able offense, officers are less likely to incarcerate with cooperation, he said. “It’s a higher likelihood that you’ll be incarcerated if you try to hide and attempt to destroy evidence and fail to cooperate,” Cleveland said. “It is not our policy to incarcerate everybody that we encounter that is consuming alcohol underage.” The recent influx in arrests for underage drinking has many students on edge. Junior Sarah Beringer said “a ton of people are talking about it.” “A lot of people are more scared,” she said. “And some are really pissed off.” Junior Nick Grasberger said he has noticed a large increase in incidents. “This year, so many more people have been arrested as opposed to just written up,” he said. “This year is unprecedented to the point where you don’t really feel safe anywhere.” The large number of arrests has driven students to change their habits when it comes to weekend activities. For Beringer, it means staying sober when venturing off campus. For Grasberger, who lives in St. Edward’s Hall, it sometimes means not going off campus at all. “We’ve had a couple parties in St. Ed’s as opposed to just going straight off campus,” he said. “Then when I have gone off campus, I haven’t stayed anywhere too long.” Grasberger said the arrests are especially notable because there may be other crimes occurring in the area that could have more of an impact. “The South Bend police are not focusing on the things that are important for law enforcement. When you’re out busting parties to get money at the expense of preventing actual crime in a town where crime is a real issue, then that’s a problem,” he said. “The priorities of legal authorities have to be elsewhere.”last_img read more


OECD calls for vigilance on ‘search for yield’, lenience on solvency

first_imgInternational regulators must monitor pension funds in their ‘search for yield’ as they try to secure benefit promises by investing in increasingly risky assets, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has warned.The Paris-based think tank published a paper looking at whether pension funds and insurance companies would be able to maintain promises made in higher-interest-rate times, given the current low-yield environment.In a stark warning, it said regulators should be more lenient on forcing solvency requirements in times of market stress while ensuring pension funds were not taking excessive investment risks that could lead to insolvency.It said there was a serious concern for the financial longevity of pension funds should they become embroiled in an “excessive search for yield” to cover promises made when interest rates were higher. In its Business and Finance Outlook 2015 report, the OECD said pension funds, by increasing the risk profiles, could be “seriously compromising their solvency situation” if a financial shock such as a liquidity freeze took place.Its data showed that, while the overall investment in alternatives had increased, this could be down to overall larger portfolios, with the exception of the UK.The OECD’s UK data showed pension funds clearly engaging in the search for yield, with an upward trend in private equity and structured products.Given the prolonged effect of low interest rates on pension funds, the OECD highlighted duration-matching assets, renegotiating promises, increasing contributions and easing regulation as solutions to alleviate concerns.It echoed calls for regulatory requirements to fund solvency shortfalls to be counter-cyclical, meaning additional funding should be made when pension fund liabilities are not being exacerbated by falling rates.The OECD’s call for leniency in solvency, and focus on investment risk, goes against the rhetoric seen from Europe’s government and regulators.Solvency requirements were discussed under the previous European Commission, while work on a risk-focused solvency framework – which may require additional funding in riskier times – is being worked on by the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA).The OECD said: “The outlook is troubling for pension funds, as solvency positions will deteriorate unless they actively adopt risk-management strategies.“However, the lack of good quality, very long-term financial assets in sufficient quantities poses serious problems to these risk-management strategies.”It said pension funds should look to close the duration gap between assets and liabilities, while policymakers should avoid excessive pressure on pension funds to correct solvency in times of weak markets.“The regulatory framework and policymakers have an important role to play in [ensuring pension funds do not take excessive risk] and need to remain vigilant to prevent excessive ‘search for yield’,” it added.However, Charles Cowling, director at UK consultancy JLT, sounded a note of caution on the OECD’s proposals.He said: “If [regulators] responded to concerns from the OECD on the poor level of funding of pension schemes and increased pressure on employers to take less risk and fund their pension schemes better, this could force some of the weaker employers into bankruptcy and put downward pressure on equity prices and make matters worse – as deficits widen as a result.”last_img read more


Coach Dr, Karni Singh tests COVID positive

first_imgNEW DELHI: A coach posted at the Dr. Karni Singh Shooting Range in the national capital has tested positive for COVID-19, the Sports Authority of India said in a statement on Thursday. The development puts further doubt on a proposed national camp for Olympic-bound shooters scheduled to take place in August. “The result of the test was intimated to the authorities by the coach on July 30,” said SAI. “The coach had visited the centre’s administrative department only on July 24, 2020. SAI had opened the range for Olympic-bound shooters on July 8. Subsequently the National Rifle Association of India (NRAI) had after a meeting on July 14 planned to start a national camp on August 1. IANS Also Watch: 3 Anti CAA Protests In Assam; 30 Indigenous Orgs Protest Todaylast_img read more