Bulldogs dominate Weed in return to playoffs

first_imgLos Molinos >> It’s been more than a decade since Los Molinos football won a playoff game, but you wouldn’t have known it Friday night when the Bulldogs ran roughshod over the visiting Weed Cougars for a 72-0 first round win. Alex Russell took the opening kickoff to the house, Henry McHale picked up a Cougars’ fumble and Hunter Landingham went in from the 25 to put the Bulldogs up 14-0 inside the opening minute of play, setting the tone for the evening.The Cougars moved the ball well on a …last_img read more


Living Fossils Rise from the Dead

first_imgThe oxymoron “living fossil” is suggestive.  Seeing a plant or animal come to life, when it was only known from fossils, might seem miraculous.  Perhaps, though, the phrase was invented to rescue Darwinian theory from the vast ages it requires.  Is it credible to believe the time gaps?  Here are two recent stories about creatures long thought dead, only to be found doing “Quite well, thank you.” Tick talk.  Researchers in South Africa were sure that the living fossil they found represented an “evolutionary missing link” that might help explain relationships between several lineages of arthropods that “evolved” the blood feeding trait independently.  This led to queer sentences like this in their PLoS One paper.1  “Thus, even though blood-feeding evolved in the ancestral tick lineage, the adaptation to the mammalian and avian blood-feeding interfaces occurred independently in the soft and hard tick families.”  It also seems weird for the ancestor of diverse lineages of ticks to be doing just fine in a living form, with no evolutionary change for many millions of years: In conclusion, phylogenetic analysis indicates that N. namaqua groups basal to both tick families and is the closest extant lineage to the last common ancestral tick lineage. Its argasid-like feeding behaviour and biology provides compelling evidence for the evolution of a blood-feeding lifestyle within the last common ancestral tick lineage. The semi-arid nature of the Northern Cape as found in Namaqualand and the Karoo has been maintained since Permian times. The partiality of N. namaqua for xeric environments and small reptiles could therefore be an indication of a lifestyle maintained for more than 250 million years. This would truly make this tick species a living fossil. Real eel:  Another living fossil announced recently is a “primitive” looking eel found swimming in a cave on Palau that PhysOrg said is squirming into the record books.  Why?  “A new species of eel found in the gloom of an undersea cave is a ‘living fossil’ astonishingly similar to the first eels that swam some 200 million years ago, biologists reported on Wednesday.”  The BBC News included a short video clip of the slick-looking swimmer.  Going on about how “primitive” it looked (at first glance, it looks rather stylish), the article quoted the scientists giving their evaluation:  “In some features it is more primitive than recent eels, and in others, even more primitive than the oldest known fossil eels, suggesting that it represents a ‘living fossil’ without a known fossil record.”  This begs the question of why it survives intact to this day, unevolved.  Even worse, the article put forth an apparent contradiction:  “Their results suggest this new family has been evolving independently for the last 200m years, placing their origins in the early Mesozoic era, when dinosaurs were beginning their domination of the planet.”  If it has been evolving for 200 million years, why does it look primitive?  Why is it a living fossil? “The term “living fossil” was coined by Charles Darwin in his book On the Origin of Species,” the article on PhysOrg informed its readers.  “It is used to describe species that have survived for millions of years, exploiting niches that are so stable that there is little pressure on them to evolve.”  Of course, to evolve is an active verb infinitive that cannot be applied to dumb eels, as if they had any choice in the matter, environmental pressure or not.  And if stable niches reduce the pressure on evolution, it would be surprising that anything in the ocean, one of the first stable habitats on earth, ever evolved as Darwinians claim they did. 1. Mans, de Klerk, Pienaar, and Latif, “Nuttalliella namaqua: A Living Fossil and Closest Relative to the Ancestral Tick Lineage: Implications for the Evolution of Blood-Feeding in Ticks,” Public Library of Science One, 6(8): e23675. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0023675. Stop letting Darwinists get away with these word games.  If their theory explains extreme diversification alongside extreme stasis, then it is explaining opposite things with equal ease.  Therefore, “living fossil” explains nothing.  As an oxymoron, it is all moron and no oxy. The evidence only makes sense without the millions of years.  The living creatures resemble the fossil creatures because they are not separated by vast swaths of mythical time, but came from a created world with much more diversity than our impoverished remnant.  Close the time gap.  (This gives “Darwin-of-the-gaps” a new twist.)(Visited 44 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


More South Africans banking

first_img6 December 2006The number of South Africans with a bank account rose by around 1.5-million between 2005 and 2006, reaching a total of 15.9-million people or 51% of the country’s 31.1-million adults (people over the age of 16).And the entry-level Mzansi bank account, introduced in 2004 to offer an easy-to-use and affordable banking solution for “the unbanked” in South Africa, has proved “undoubtedly a success”.That’s according to FinMark Trust’s FinScope SA 2006, an annual national household survey of financial services, needs and usage among South Africans.According to the survey, released this week, South Africa’s banked population increased by 11% between 2005 and 2006, far outstripping the 1% population growth in the same period.However, the ability of the banking sector to draw in the other half of the population will depend, ultimately, not on provision of easier or cheaper access, or better financial education, but on fundamental changes in the economic realities of the country.Mzansi: ‘impressive uptake’South Africa’s financial sector charter, signed in October 2003, commits the country’s financial institutions to extending first-order retail banking products to 80% of South Africans in the lowest income bracket (LSM 1-5) by 2008.According to FinScope, South Africa’s low-cost bank account, Mzansi – introduced with these lower-income customers in mind – claimed the lion’s share of new banking customers over the last year.The percentage of South Africans holding an Mzansi account rose from 2% in 2005 to 6% in 2006 – a staggering growth of around 250%. In the same period, the percentage of the banked population using Mzansi grew fourfold, from 3% to 12%.Claimed Mzansi account holders are nearing the 2-million mark, the survey finds, noting that this might be an under-reading of Mzansi’s actual size: the Banking Association SA reported that 3.3-million Mzansi accounts had been opened by June.FinScope says this discrepancy “could be because many users of Mzansi do not actually realise the type of account they hold. For example, PostBank account holders were all switched to Mzansi accounts.”Most importantly, according to the survey, Mzansi has been successful at drawing previously unbanked people into the banking sector, not solely causing account switching among the already banked.“Sixty percent of people holding a Mzansi account claim this to be their first bank account, an encouraging indicator that the product is being adopted by its core target market.”The financial divide persistsHowever, while the drive to bring more South Africans into the banking system appears to be working – and despite strong indicators that uptake of the Mzansi account will continue to grow – the financial divide between rich and poor in the country will, if it persists, sooner or later put the brakes on this growth.According to the survey, investment and even saving money is still uncommon among South Africans – and so is borrowing – with unemployment and lack of money to save being the two main reasons given for not being banked.“Where people do borrow, they do so mainly to buy food, pay for funerals, school fees or medical expenses. The reason is clearly the degree of poverty: 17% of South African say they have no income at all, and nearly one-third of South Africans testify that they do not even have enough to eat.”That over one-third of people (35%) who know about Mzansi still consider the account unaffordable “highlights the real barrier to entry that bank charges pose, no matter how low,” the survey finds.For “a great proportion of our population,” any sort of banking product is unaffordable – and, as things stand, probably unnecessary.“As such, unless the economic realities of our country change fundamentally, the Mzansi account is likely to reach a ceiling in terms of what it can realistically achieve.”SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more


Defending champion Karlovic wins in Hall of Fame tourney

first_imgLacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ LeBron loses ‘best teammate’ Jones to Suns Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Top-seeded John Isner, the big-serving American who won Newport titles in 2011 and 2012, used 13 aces to beat Australia’s Sam Groth 6-2, 6-4. Isner will play fellow American Dennis Novikov, a 6-3, 6-2 winner over Canada’s Frank Dancevic.American Bjorn Fratangelo also advanced, beating Australia’s Akira Santillan 7-6 (3), 3-6, 6-1.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsTwo seeded players lost. Tobias Kamke of Germany edged No. 3 Adrian Mannarino, the Frenchman who reached the round of 16 at Wimbledon, 7-6 (5), 7-5, and Australian qualifier Matthew Ebden beat No. 6 Lukas Lacko of Slovakia 6-1, 7-6 (2).No. 4 Pierre-Hugues Herbert of France’s battled past Spain’s Adrian Menendez-Maceiras 7-5, 2-6, 6-3. National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo LATEST STORIES Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet Croatia’s Ivo Karlovic returns a ball to Britain’s Aljaz Bedene during their Men’s Singles Match on day one at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London Monday, July 3, 2017. (Gareth Fuller/PA via AP)NEWPORT, R.I.  — Defending champion Ivo Karlovic of Croatia beat American Denis Kudla 6-4, 6-4 on Wednesday in his Hall of Fame Tennis Championships opener to reach the quarterfinals in the grass-court event.The 38-year-old Karlovic had 16 aces and broke Kudla’s serve three times. Karlovic will face Germany’s Peter Gojowczyk, a 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 winner over Russia’s Konstantin Kravchuk.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more


Brazil’s former FIFA boss Havelange, 100, dies in Rio

first_imgSource: ReutersTweetPinShare0 Shares Joao Havelange, the former president of FIFA, died in Rio de Janeiro’s Samaritano Hospital on Tuesday, the hospital said, without giving further details until authorised by his family.The former Olympic swimmer and water polo player for Brazil had been in and out of the hospital in recent months with respiratory problems.Havelange, who was 100, was the first non-European to head the International Football Federation (FIFA), world football‘s governing body. He helped to transform the group and its flagship event, the World Cup, into a multibillion-dollar enterprise.After serving 24 years as head of FIFA, Havelange resigned as its honorary president amid corruption allegations against him and others in 2013.The Engenhao stadium in Rio de Janeiro, where many of the Rio Olympic events are currently underway, was named in his honorlast_img read more