Youth Trans Tasman Award Winners

first_imgTroy Malcolm award – Oscar SanftRoxy Winder award – Kirsty Quince Australian 18’s Boys captain, Oscar Sanft, was given the Troy Malcolm award, while Australian 20’s Girls player, Kirsty Quince, was the recipient of the Roxy Winder award. 18’s GirlsPlayers Player – Emily ReedCoaches Award – Sarah PeattieEncouragement Award – Charlotte Caslick20’s Girls Players Player – Emilee CherryCoaches Award – Kirsty Quince18’s BoysPlayers Player – Brentt Warr and Zach StrasserCoaches Award – Simon Lang20’s BoysPlayers Player – Nick GoodCoaches Award – Dylan Thompsonlast_img read more


Arniel happy with Blue Jackets performance despite loss to Ducks

Tuesday night’s 3-2 loss to the Anaheim Ducks was the Columbus Blue Jackets’ first regulation defeat in their last six games — and it hurt. Goals from left winger captain Rick Nash, who has scored in the Jackets’ past eight games, and center Derick Brassard were not enough to overcome early power-play goals by Anaheim at Nationwide Arena. In the first period, Jackets winger Derek Dorsett unleashed a dangerous hit on Ducks winger Corey Perry, sending him headfirst into the boards. Perry fell to the ice, and players from both teams exchanged shoves behind the Anaheim goal before referees separated the players and assessed a five-minute boarding penalty to Dorsett. “It was a hit from behind,” Jackets coach Scott Arniel said. “It’s the referee’s judgment call. When you give (Anaheim) a five-minute major, that gets them off to a pretty good start.” That judgment call produced a two-goal lead for the Ducks. Anaheim wingers teamed up for the first tally. Bobby Ryan fed a pass across the slot to a streaking Teemu Selanne, who had no trouble scoring his 15th goal of the year to give Anaheim a 1-0 lead. Defenseman Cam Fowler’s fifth goal of the year gave the Ducks a 2-0 lead just more than a minute later. After being fed by defenseman Lubomir Visnovsky and center Saku Koivu, Fowler snapped a long-range shot that snuck past Jackets goalie Steve Mason. Before Columbus fans had settled into their seats, the Ducks had scored their first two shots of the game. But the Jackets responded with a power-play goal of their own just before the first intermission. Nash cut the Ducks’ lead in half with a wrist shot from the slot. Brassard assisted on Nash’s 23rd goal of the season, which made the score 2-1. A quiet second period saw the teams exchange scoring opportunities, but Mason and Ducks goalie Jonas Hiller denied everything. Mason and Hiller finished the night with 19 and 35 saves, respectively. But the game had more goals in store, as Ducks winger Jason Blake would give the Ducks breathing room early in the third period. Blake scored his 10th goal of the season on an uncontested backhand shot, extending the Ducks’ lead to 3-1. Mason was left helpless and hunched in the lower, left-hand corner of his goal when Blake emerged from behind the net. Brassard later narrowed Columbus’ deficit to 3-2 after a redirected shot from the blue line fell to him just outside Hiller’s crease. The tap-in goal, assisted on by winger Jakub Voracek, was Brassard’s 12th of the season. Thanks to Hiller, who extinguished a late surge by the Jackets, the Ducks eventually held on for a 3-2 win. Despite Tuesday’s loss, Columbus will enter the NHL All-Star break with a 3-1-2 record in its last six games. Brassard focused on the Jackets’ recent improvements following the loss to Anaheim. “I think we had a good push tonight,” Brassard said. “In the third, we competed really hard. We are just going to take some rest right now and make sure we are ready to make a big push.” Coach Randy Carlyle’s Ducks head into the midseason break in fifth place in the Western Conference. Carlyle commended his players for their effort. “The guys are putting it on the line,” Carlyle said. “Our guys have worked extremely hard to get themselves in the position we are in. We’re having some fun right now.” Arniel managed to stay upbeat about his team’s current standing after the game. “What we’ve done in the last two weeks has been very good,” Arniel said. “I like the way we’re working and competing.” The Blue Jackets will host the Chicago Blackhawks at 7 p.m. Tuesday. read more


Alcino Lavrador Altice Labs general manager Alci

first_imgAlcino LavradorAltice Labs’ general manager, Alcino Lavrador, discusses IP delivery, the advent of 5G and unpicks some of the biggest technical challenges facing the TV industry today.What television or broadcast projects are currently occupying most of Altice Labs’ time?At Altice we want to offer the best and most unique user experience to our television customers. For that, Altice Labs is working on an “Altice User Experience” supported over a unified platform for all access networks: FTTH, Cable, xDSL, Wi-Fi, 3G/4G. This means, among others, and not to mention the technological challenges of merging platforms, presenting content in a more thematic way, less siloed in channels. On the mobility side, our efforts are to bring more and more functionalities previously restricted to fixed-access IPTV, namely better personalisation and seamless continuity between platforms.What do you think are the biggest technological challenges facing the TV industry in 2017?Customers today want to watch TV not only on the big screen but also on the move and on more and more portable devices, even at home and simultaneously. So, WiFi delivery inside the home, supporting multiple streams with the same quality that the customers are used to, is probably the biggest challenge. To deliver 4K TV consistently over WiFi is no small feat today. 802.11ac with 4×4 and mesh extenders will help and will have a big push in 2017, but compatibility issues with existing STBs will come up. In addition we will see growth in data mining and analytics about customer behaviour – aiming at a better personalised offering and also a new revenue stream for advertising. Not least, as digital content availability is growing exponentially, new and easier ways to discover real-time and stored content must appear in order to enhance the customer experience.How useful is full duplex DOCSIS 3.1 for maximising cable bandwidth and what technology or technologies will come after that?Full duplex DOCSIS 3.1 and other such evolutions for cable can represent additional tools in our toolbox for delivering the best possible bandwidth to our customers as a very efficient value-for-money proposition. It’s possible that it will be used in some places, and in other places maybe GPON is a better solution. Or we could keep the cable plant as it is or with small improvements and just do a selective subscriber migration, putting the most eager customers on FTTH/GPON, which leaves more bandwidth for the remaining ones. We need to remember that FDX DOCSIS 3.1 comes at a price, with added complexity, without MPEG-TS Video and an all new silicon solution required. At Altice Labs we are working on NGPON2, developing our own equipment and technology, because we believe this will be the future for next-generation access networks.What challenges will arise from the greater move towards IP delivery of content?At Altice Labs we don’t see this move as a set of challenges but more as a new opportunity. In Portugal we have, for a long time, had a full IPTV solution in place and we think that IP delivery of content is a significant improvement. For instance, as a multi-national group, Altice can leverage our data networks in completely different geographies to allow us to produce content in one place, complement it in another, and deliver it to all the group operators. To do that in a non-IP network can be a nightmare, but with IP it just leverages our existing infrastructure, knowledge and investment. Most cable operators are already using IP delivery of content as the back-end for QAM muxes, for VOD or catch-up TV, so most times you just remove the QAM muxes. You need a correctly dimensioned CDN. However, you should have it in place anyway since most of the growth in consumption is in on-demand and is happening in additional devices that are already IP-only.How important do you think 5G will be to the future of TV, as viewers increasingly stream content on the move and to different devices?Although the big screen TV will continue to be a staple of our day to day life, and people still want to see the hottest content on the biggest screen, there is no doubt that personal and mobile video consumption will continue to grow. 5G will have an important role in that respect. According to research, by 2020, more than half of all mobile traffic will be video. People are watching it on small and not so small screens with increased resolutions, some with 2K and 4K screens, so video quality really matters. What also matters is latency and buffering time, all areas were 5G promises to improve the customer experience. We also expect that in the future, people will increasingly broadcast self-produced content as has been demonstrated by trends like Periscope, Facebook Live and YouTube Live. 5G will allow for this kind of experience in crowded spaces, like music festivals, where today’s technologies have a huge challenge. These are only a couple of examples. We expect new uses cases in line with the increasing digitisation of our society enabled by current 3G/4G with services like Uber and other digital platform-based services.Do you think traditional over-the-air broadcast will eventually become obsolete? If so, how long until that will happen?If you’re talking about DTT, yes I think that it will become obsolete. The main reason is that these frequencies are a prime asset for telecommunications and there will be a point in time that people will place more value on this spectrum being used for ‘mobile data’ than for broadcast TV. People will get all the TV they want as ‘mobile data’ anyway. It will take some time but it will happen.What do you think about the long-term viability of DTH satellite TV as a mass-market delivery mechanism? I don’t believe that DTH will go away anytime soon. It’s a completely different proposition than DTT, there are countries like Brazil that have a massive area with people scattered all over the place that will only be able to get broad, good quality content this way. In these countries it will still be a mass-market proposition. In other countries, like in Europe, it will be used more as a complementary solution for places that the fixed network will not reach. Even the foreseen 5G will not be suitable as an alternative to deliver 4K, 8K or whatever resolution we will have at that time. DTH will always be able to solve this.How does Altice Labs divide its efforts between its teams in Portugal, the US, France, Israel, Brazil. Do you all have different remits and responsibilities?We try to take advantage of what is being done better in each geography avoiding overlap and duplication of work. If we have a good application developed in France, the United States, or whatever geography, we’ll try to use it in all the group operations. The origin of Altice Labs dates back to 1950 with over 66 years shaping the telecommunications evolution not only in Portugal but also in all the places where our technology has been deployed. Achievements like mobile prepaid services that we pioneered in 1995 have been of worldwide benefit. Over our 66 years of history, much more could be highlighted, like one of the first commercial interactive cable TV service in 2001. More recently, in August 2015, we did a field trial of NGPON2 technology with Verizon, the first with tuneable optics offering symmetrical broadband speeds of up to 10 Gbps, with the potential to go even higher – up to 40 or even 80Gbps in the near future. An existing innovation ecosystem in Portugal, supported by strong partnerships with universities, industry and startups, and complemented with R&D collaboration projects under European Union Framework Programmes like H2020, enables a continuous flow of innovation. This is feeding the process of developing new and advanced products that are being deployed in over 40 countries in the world, not just in Altice’s geographies. We do not simply follow the technological evolutions; we are part of them!What are Altice Labs’ key aims for the year ahead?The first objective is to support Altice’s aggressive expansion providing state-of-the-art technology enabling a clear differentiation to competitors. Besides being an R&D lab, we have a solid product orientation strategy with a market positioning and growth ambition. We believe we are a key factor that can help turn Altice into the most innovative CSP in the world. We are committed to evolving our products for the most efficiency practices, incorporating the results from R&D exploratory projects in network architectures – like SDN and NFV for our product lines of network systems, OSS, convergent charging and policy platforms, and TV solutions. Of course, maintaining the creativity culture that has been in our DNA  for years, in parallel with the committed and quality delivery of solutions to the market, is the main challenge in a fast-paced industry.Alcino Lavrador will speak at Cable Congress in Brussels this week. He is due to appear on the ‘Fostering Innovation’ panel at 16:45 on March 8, 2017.last_img read more


Heres a chart that Washington state reader SA s

first_img Here’s a chart that Washington state reader S.A. shamelessly ripped from a Zero Hedge piece yesterday—and I thought I’d offer it with no comment. I was amazed by the big withdrawal from SLV yesterday The gold price chopped sideways in a five dollar price range up until shortly before 1 p.m. GMT in London on their Thursday.  Then, in a minute or so, the price got sold down about six bucks, before rallying strongly after that.  The rally got capped less than an hour later at 8:30 a.m. in New York.  From there, gold traded sideways until about noon—and at that point it developed a slightly positive price bias, which really developed some legs at 2:30 p.m. in the thinly-traded New York Access Market.  That rally lasted until just about 4 p.m. EST—gold’s high of the day—and then the price didn’t do much after that going into the electronic close. The CME Group recorded the low and high ticks as $1,307.10 and $1,325.30 in the April contract. Gold finished the Thursday session in New York at $1,323.00 spot, up $12.10 from Wednesday.  Volume, net of February and March, was very decent at 144,000 contracts. The silver price had much more of a roller coaster ride in Far East and morning trading in London—but after the sell-off just before 1 p.m. GMT in London, the silver price action followed the gold price action like a shadow, including the rally in the thinly-traded electronic market after the Comex close—and silver’s high price tick of the day just before 4 p.m. EST. The low and high prices were reported as $21.515 and $21.90 in the March contract. Silver finished the Thursday session at $21.82 spot, up 28.5 cents from Wednesday’s close.  Net volume was less than on Wednesday, but a still very decent 32,500 contracts. Here’s the New York Spot Silver [Bid] chart for yesterday—and as I said, it looks almost identical to the spot gold chart posted above. After getting sold down early in Far East trading on their Thursday, both platinum and palladium rallied to finish in the green, but only by a few dollars each.  Here are the charts. The gold stocks rallied right from the open, with a big chunk of the gains in by the London p.m. gold fix.  After that, the stocks rallied continued to rally higher, but at a much more modest rate.  Then, when gold had its rally in the thinly-traded electronic market after the Comex close, the shares rallied a bit more—and the HUI finished up 3.89%—virtually on its high of the day, gaining back all of Wednesday’s losses and a bit more.  I was impressed. The silver equities rallied right from the open as well—and most of their gains were in by precisely 11 a.m. EST.  After that they traded sideways, but caught a bit of a tail wind as well when silver rallied in after hours trading in New York before the equity markets closed.  Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Sentiment Index closed up 4.03%—not gaining back everything it lost on Wednesday, but pretty close. Skyharbour Resources (TSX-V: SYH) is a uranium exploration company and a member of the Western Athabasca Syndicate which controls a large, geologically prospective land package consisting of five properties (709,513 acres) in the Athabasca Basin of Saskatchewan. The properties are strategically located to the north, south, east and west of Fission Uranium’s (TSX-V: FCU) Patterson Lake South (“PLS”) recent high grade uranium discovery on the western flank of the Athabasca Basin. $6,000,000 in combined exploration expenditures over the next two years is planned on these properties, $5,000,000 of which is being funded by the three partner companies. Numerous high-potential drill targets have been identified with drilling to start in March, 2014. The Company has recently acquired a 60% interest in the Mann Lake Uranium Project on the east side of the Basin strategically located 25km southwest of Cameco’s McArthur River Mine. The ground adjacent to this property is Cameco’s Mann Lake Joint Venture where an aggressive 13,000 metre, 18-hole drill program is about to commence and previous grades of up to 7.12% uranium have been intersected in drilling. The Company has 43.6 million shares outstanding with insiders owning over 25% of the outstanding shares. Skyharbour’s goal is to maximize shareholder value through new mineral discoveries, committed long-term partnerships, and the advancement of exploration projects in geopolitically favourable jurisdictions. Please visit our website to learn more about the company and request information.center_img The CME’s Daily Delivery Report showed that 145 gold and zero silver contracts were posted for delivery within the Comex-approved depositories on Monday.  The short/issuer on 140 of those contracts was Barclays.  They also stopped 50 contracts as well.  HSBC USA stopped another 65 contracts.  The link to yesterday’s Issuers and Stoppers Report is here. There were no reported changes in GLD on Thursday—but over at SLV there was a big surprise in store.  After a huge deposit of 3.85 million troy ounces on Tuesday, there was a big withdrawal of 2,212,315 troy ounces yesterday. The only answer I have for this, is something that Ted Butler has been talking about for the last couple of years.  He suspects that a big buyer has been purchasing shares by the truckload [read JPMorgan Chase] and has been continuously redeeming their shares for physical metal so they don’t exceed SLV reporting requirements.  In a nutshell, this means that JPM is using SLV as a vehicle to load up on the shares—and the physical metal at the same time—without having  to report it to anyone.   This is over and above what they show in their Comex-approved depository. This may also have been what’s happening in GLD since the start of they year as well. As I mentioned yesterday, the big rallies in both silver and gold have not been matched by corresponding deposits in either SLV or GLD—and Ted Butler’s explanation as to why it’s not happening is the only theory that holds any water., at least for me.  If you have another idea, I’d love to here from you. Over at the Switzerland’s Zürcher Kantonalbank for the week ending Friday, February 14, they reported a smallish decline in their gold ETF of 5,611 troy ounces.  Their silver ETF showed a small increase of 29,353 troy ounces. Joshua Gibbons, the “Guru of the SLV Bar List” had this to report on the weekly goings-on within the SLV ETF for the week ending at the close of trading on Wednesday:  “Analysis of the 19 February 2014 bar list, and comparison to the previous week’s list—9,670,272.5 troy ounces were removed (all from Brinks London), 13,037,078.1 troy ounces were added (all to Brinks London), no bars had a serial number change.“ “In reality, 5,290,714.0 oz were added—and 1,923,884.0 removed. The other 7.7M oz appears to be a ‘substitution’ (JPM removed bars, such as 6.7M oz of Russian State Refineries and Met-Mex bars, and replaced them with different ones, such as Kazakhmys and Valcambi bars).“ “As of the time that the bar list was produced, it was overallocated 557.5 oz.  All daily changes are reflected on the bar list.”  The link to Joshua’s website is here. For the second day in a row, there was no reported in/out movement in gold at the Comex-approved depositories on Wednesday—and is almost always the case, there was more in/out activity in silver, as 74,150 troy ounces were reported received—and 303,398 troy ounces were shipped out.  The link to that activity is here. Here’s a three-year chart of the Continuous Commodity Index, the CCI, which is the new name for the old CRB Index—and look at it fly as of the start of the year.  It’s hugely overbought, but worth keeping an eye on.  If the central banks of the world are looking for inflation, here’s the first sign that it’s on its way.  The new CRB chart looks similar. Here’s a chart that Casey Research’s own Jeff Clark sends our way every few weeks.  It’s the latest monetary base numbers from the St. Louis Fed.  Soon the line will break through the $4.0 trillion mark. I have another bunch of stories for you today—and you can cherry pick from the selections offered. Undoubtedly, we’ll get a measure of what they may be up to in Friday’s Commitments of Traders Report. Specifically, what JPMorgan has done, particularly in silver, will likely be the key feature. JPM hasn’t sold on higher prices over the past two reporting weeks in either gold or silver and that has been the big standout so far. If JPMorgan turns out to have sold some of its long gold position on higher prices, there’s not much to say. But if this crooked bank starts adding short positions in silver, there will be plenty to say, namely, overt price manipulation. – Silver analyst Ted Butler: 19 February 2014 To tell you the truth, I don’t know what to make of yesterday’s price action in either gold or silver.  Don’t get me wrong, I was more than happy to see both metals do as well as they did—and as Ted Butler has told me on many occasions, it’s a mug’s game trying to forecast what might happen in day to day price action. As Ted mentioned in his quote above, we get the latest Commitment of Traders Report for positions held at the close of Comex trading on Tuesday—and I will be awaiting the numbers with some anticipation; hoping for the best, but expecting the worst.  Whatever the numbers show, I’ll have it all for you in tomorrow’s column. Once again I was amazed by the big withdrawal from SLV yesterday.  As I said in yesterday’s column, with gold up $100—and silver up 2 bucks so far this year, metal should be pouring into both GLD and SLV.  They are to a certain extent, but no sooner does metal get deposited, when some is taken out. Ted has his explanation for this, which I posted further up—and it makes perfect sense to me.  If you wish to refresh your memory, you can scroll up and read it again, as I don’t wish to repeat myself in this space. One thing I have noticed is that the further down the road we get on this price management scheme in all four precious metals, the more inexplicable it gets.  Whatever is happening out of sight of the general public, which includes us, appears to be well organized—and sooner or later it will all come to an end.  At that point we should have some sort of dénouement on all of this—and that day can’t come soon enough for me, although it does fall into the category of “be careful what you wish for.” We did have the usual sell-off in both gold and silver in early trading in the Far East on the their Friday morning—but both platinum and palladium emerged unscathed.  Both gold and silver struggled higher later in the day—and as I write this paragraph, London has been open for 10 minutes.  Both silver and gold are down from Thursday’s close in New York—and both platinum and palladium are basically unchanged.  Volumes in both metals are considerably lighter than they were this time yesterday—and the dollar index is up a handful of basis points. And as I put the finishing touches on today’s efforts shortly after 5 a.m. EST, I note that prices haven’t changed by much in all four precious metals.  Gold volume is still on the lighter side—and mostly of the HFT variety.  Silver’s volume is decent as well, but once the roll-overs are subtracted out, the real volume is not overly heavy, either—and the dollar is still up the same handful of basis points. Since today is Friday, it’s hard to know what to expect as far as price action is concerned for the rest of the day.  But as is almost always the case, it’s what happens during the New York trading day that really matters—and I don’t expect today will be any different. By the way, with what appears to be the start of a major up-trend in the precious metals, it might be worth your while to jump back in, or increase your exposure to the precious metals once again, as the HUI is already up over 22% year-to-date.  Your best bets for that are Casey Research’s monthly BIG GOLD newsletter—and Casey Research’s flagship publication—Casey International Speculator.  If you go for Casey International Speculator, it includes a subscription to BIG GOLD at no extra charge. It costs nothing to check them out—and Casey Research’s 90-day money back guarantee applies to both. That’s all I have for today.  I hope you enjoy your weekend, or what’s left of it if you live west of the International Date Line—and I’ll see you here tomorrow. Sponsor Advertisement Here’s the New York Spot Gold [Bid] chart so you can see the Comex price action in more detail. The dollar index closed late on Wednesday afternoon in New York at 80.21—and once the trading day began in the Far East on their Thursday, the index slid down to its 80.04 low shortly before 2:30 p.m. Hong Kong time.  From there it rallied to its 80.41 high at noon in New York in a broad trading range.  After that it gave up some of its gains by 4 p.m. EST—and then didn’t do much after that, closing the day at 80.28—up a whole 7 basis points from Wednesday’s close.last_img read more


In This Issue   Dollars allout assault is st

first_imgIn This Issue. *  Dollar’s all-out assault is stopped.. *  Euro rebounds on cease fire news. *  Aussie 2nd QTR GDP beats expectations! *  China to spend some reserves on shipping. And Now. Today’s A Pfennig For Your Thoughts. Ukraine / Russia Agree To Cease Fire. Maybe. Good Day! .  And a Wonderful Wednesday to you! Man, I had better get my eye checked! I think I’m beginning to read stuff that’s not the way it’s presented! Here’s the skinny: I woke up from a quick and not long enough nap to answer the door yesterday afternoon, and after welcoming the ATT guy into the house, I brought up my work email on my mobile device, and there was an email from our office managing guru, Danielle, telling me about elevator work that would take place around the time I arrive in the morning. “Great! I said, for I had some blood work that I needed to get done tomorrow, so I’ll just stay home, write and then go get the blood work done, rather than get all dialed in at work to leave right away.  Unfortunately, the email said Sept 4.. not Sept 3. UGH! So, I’m writing from home today, when I didn’t have to! The elevator work is tomorrow! What a dolt I am sometimes! Front and Center this morning, there was word earlier that Russia and Ukraine had agreed to a cease-fire. But then the “official word” from the Kremlin came out, and said that the Russian and Ukrainian Presidents had only discussed steps toward peace. There’s been no further discussion on what that meant, or maybe it was just a matter of semantics, but it sounds to me that the Kremlin wants their say before any “agreement” is made. The Currency traders are taking this “non-agreement in stone” as a good sign, and the euro has rallied a little bit. In fact the dollar’s all-out assault on the currencies and metals yesterday, (Gold lost $24) has backed off a bit this morning, albeit the moves are small. I forgot to mention yesterday that there is a bevy of Central Bank meetings this week, and that all gets started today with the Bank of Canada (BOC) meeting.  I don’t expect any surprises from the BOC today, and their neutral bias should remain in place. The recent data from Canada, as chronicled here in the Pfennig, has been upbeat, but I doubt it’s enough. yet that is. Oh, and before I forget again. which, I might add, seems to be happening to me more and more these days, the other central bank meetings this week include the European Central Bank (ECB), The Bank of England (BOE), and the Bank of Japan (BOJ). And we can’t take our eye off the ball with regards to the Jobs Jamboree, which will take place on Friday this week! So, an event-full week, but in the end it will be just a bunch of boondoggles and cooked booked. The Biggest mover overnight, is the Aussie dollar (A$).  Australia printed their 2nd QTR GDP last night, and it showed a solid number of .5% for the QTR and 3.1% year on year. That beat the expectations, and the A$ has reversed yesterday’s selling on the news. I did see “something” as a doctor might say to a patient, that we’ll have to keep our eye on. The Personal Income component of the GDP report showed a -.6% decline in disposable income.  That’s not a good sign for the 3rd QTR. Just like I told you yesterday about how the Personal Income decline in the U.S. was not good for 3rd QTR GDP, the same will hold true for Australia, unless.. this was just a blip, and the next two months turn around, which is why I say we’ll have to keep our eye on this.  But for right here ,right now, the A$ is in rally mode, so don’t stop it now, it’s on a roll!  Remember when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor? The Germans bombed Pearl Harbor? Don’t Stop him he’s on a roll.  HAHAHAHAHA! One of the funniest scenes ever in a movie. On a side bar.  A few years ago,  used that line about the Germans bombing Pearl Harbor, and I actually had a few readers send me notes telling be that it was Not the Germans, but the Japanese that bombed Pearl Harbor. That made the whole line even more funny! Of course the actual bombing is not, was not funny. I’m strictly talking about the line in the Animal House movie! Back to Australia for a minute. Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) Gov. Stevens, made some comments after the 2nd QTR GDP report printed last night, and in his speech, he made a tactical error, and sound hawkish. I’m certain that he didn’t mean to do this, but h did, and the A$ was the beneficiary. I wouldn’t be surprised to see him come out with a retraction. There’s news this morning from two of my fave currencies / countries. Sweden and Norway, and none of the news is good.  In Sweden, the markets are calling for the Riksbank to implement unconventional methods to reach their target inflation rate. Read, Quantitative Easing / QE. I shake my head in disgust, for this Central Bank USED to be prudent and kept their eyes on price stability. And in Norway, the latest data from Statistics Norway, their latest survey of Oil producers and explorers suggest an 18% drop in investments next year. So far in 2014, they’ve seen a 14% decline in investments. So a further drag on the Norwegian economy next year, folks. Of course this is where you reach back in the memory bank and recall that Chuck told you of the huge cash reserves from Oil that Norway is holding, and you say, “But, Chuck, doesn’t the Norwegian Gov’t have a 140.9 Billion krone revenue pile that they could use to plug deficits and support growth during this slowdown?” And I would say, yes! You, dear reader, get a Gold Star! Both the Eurozone and he U.K. printed their latest Services PMI’s this morning, and it was like two ships passing in the night. the U.K. Services industry printed above expectations, while the Eurozone’s print was slightly weaker. But still above 50 (actually at 52.5) But this morning is all about the cease-fire, no cease-fire between Ukraine and Russia.  And any sign that the sanctions could be removed would be HUGE for the Eurozone! Gold has found a bid this morning, albeit a small bid, after losing some major ground yesterday. So, Gold loses $24 on a day when the U.S. announces air strikes in Somalia, and Russian President, Putin rates his saber, and then turns around and gains a couple of shekels when a cease-fire is announced. Now, you tell me, where the logic is in all of that! And the metal that has had the best performance so far this year, gaining 22% to date, Palladium, is getting whacked badly this morning on the cease-fire news. I have to say that I’m taken back a step or two watching this price movement in Palladium, given the need of the metal in industrial use hasn’t changed. But, the interruptions of delivery that hung over the metal like the Sword of Damocles, from strikes, earlier this year in S. Africa, and now the conflict in Russia/ Ukraine, seem now to be a thing of the past. But, I don’t think this is anything to get upset about! Look at this whacking of Palladium’s price as an opportunity to buy at a cheaper price. That’s how I look at it! The Chinese renminbi was allowed to appreciate last night.. You know how I always tell you, be yourself, no wait! No time for Mr. Wizard Chuck! I always tell you about China’s treasure chest of reserves that they can use to help the economy when they see a problem ? Well, here’s a classic case of what I’m always telling you. It was reported by the State Council overnight, that Beijing plans to build an efficient shipping system by 2020. Don’t you love it when a country makes investment in their future? So, besides the BOC meeting this morning which will most likely be a non-even, the U.S. Data Cupboard has the conn today.. Since Friday will be the Jobs Jamboree, we’ll see the ADP Employment Report for August today. the ICSC-Goldman Store Sales report, and Factory Orders. The Gallup Poll people are putting together an index on U.S. Job Creation, which should be interesting.. The U.S. Data Cupboard did produce a stronger than expected ISM Manufacturing Index (59 in August VS 57.1 in July), just as I thought, and said it would probably do, given the weakness in the dollar, but, as I also said, I would expect this index number to come down in the coming months given my expectation of a short-term dollar rally.  You see, the dollar’s value goes a long way toward whether Manufacturing cooks or not. The last time the ISM Index was this strong was March 2011.  And we had QE up to our eyeballs, so everything gets thrown out of whack as far as looking at fundamentals and history. But think you get the picture. For What It’s Worth.Well, I’ve told you all about the agreement that China and Russia signed a couple of months ago whereas Russia agreed to supply China with gas.. Well, there was news this weekend that I found at www.zerohedge.com  on this story, and it involves the largest gas pipeline in the World to link the two countries.  here’s a snippet. “If after months of Eurasian axis formation, one still hasn’t realized why in the grand game over Ukraine supremacy – not to mention superpower geopolitics – Europe, and the West, has zero leverage, while Russia has all the trump cards, then today’s latest development in Chinese-Russian cooperation should make it abundantly clear.  Overnight, following a grand ceremony in the Siberian city of Yakutsk, Russia and China officially began the construction of a new gas pipeline linking the countries. The bottom line to Russia – nearly half a trillion after China’s CNPC agreed to buy $400bn in gas from Russia’s Gazprom back in May. In return, Russia will ship 38 billion cubic meters (bcm) of gas annually over a period of 30 years. The 3,968 km pipeline linking gas fields in eastern Siberia to China will be the world’s largest fuel network in the world.” Chuck again. yes, it’s happening right before us folks. the “shift” away from a dependence on the U.S. But then long time readers will say to themselves, Hey! But Chuck has been telling us this was going to happen because of the debt buildup and history for a long time! And you would be correct! To recap. the dollar’s all-out assault on the currencies and Gold yesterday has backed off this morning with the news that maybe a cease-fire between Ukraine and Russia has been made and maybe not. Australia printed a strong 2nd QTR GDP, well stronger than expected, and RBA Gov. Stevens ended up on the hawkish side of statements, and I’m sure he didn’t mean to! Gold got whacked yesterday, but has wrapped a tourniquet around the bleeding this morning, while Palladium takes over at the bloodletting table for Gold. Not good news from Sweden and Norway this morning, and the Bank of Canada meets today, should be a non-event. Currencies today 9/3/14. American Style: A$ .9325, kiwi .8325, C$ .9175, euro 1.3160, sterling 1.6460, Swiss $1.0895, . European Style: rand 10.6965, krone 6.2045 ,SEK 6.9915, forint 238.75, zloty 3.1870, koruna 21.0315, RUB 36.92, yen 105.05, sing 1.2520, HKD 7.7505, INR 60.49, China 6.1697, pesos 13.09, BRL 2.2435, Dollar Index 82.83, Oil $93.71, 10-year 2.45%, Silver $19.17, Platinum $1,409.88, Palladium $879.00, and Gold. $1,267.80 That’s it for today. What  a dolt I am for that elevator repair mix up. UGH! It looks really froggy out this morning.  Spell checker didn’t like my version of foggy, but I told it to deal with it! Another exciting win by my beloved Cardinals last night, I sure hope this time it’s for real, and no false dawn like we’ve seen all season long! Speaking of froggy, it reminds me of many years ago, when Kathy & Chuck were driving to St. Louis from Des Moines, Ia. The fog was so thick that the only way I could continue to drive was to crack the door open so I knew where the white line on the road was. That was dangerous, yes, I know it. Just shows how desperate we were to get out of Des Moines and back home to St. Louis!  Well, after about 6 years, I finally had to have a new wireless modem put in the house. I was going crazy with all the interruptions to my TV! Hey! It’s college football season, baseball playoffs are around the corner, and the NFL starts tomorrow night, I had to get that fixed! HA! I noticed at the grocery store this past weekend that they had HUGE displays out of Halloween candy already.. UGH!  What? I next week too early to get the Christmas stuff out?  Our Hockey Blues were showing off their new jersey last week. Everything runs together now I guess! Oh well. I’ve got to get this to Mike for the finishing touches, I hope everyone has a Wonderful Wednesday! Chuck Butler President EverBank World Marketslast_img read more


Cant cool off this summer Heat waves can slow us

first_imgCan’t cool off this summer? Heat waves can slow us down in ways we may not realize.New research suggests heat stress can muddle our thinking, making simple math a little harder to do.”There’s evidence that our brains are susceptible to temperature abnormalities,” says Joe Allen, co-director of the Center for Climate, Health and the Global Environment at Harvard University. And as the climate changes, temperatures spike and heat waves are more frequent.To learn more about how the heat influences young, healthy adults, Allen and his colleagues studied college students living in dorms during a summer heat wave in Boston.Half of the students lived in buildings with central AC, where the indoor air temperature averaged 71 degrees. The other half lived in dorms with no AC, where air temperatures averaged almost 80 degrees.”In the morning, when they woke up, we pushed tests out to their cellphones,” explains Allen. The students took two tests a day for 12 consecutive days.One test, which included basic addition and subtraction, measured cognitive speed and memory. A second test assessed attention and processing speed.”We found that the students who were in the non-air-conditioned buildings actually had slower reaction times: 13 percent lower performance on basic arithmetic tests, and nearly a 10 percent reduction in the number of correct responses per minute,” Allen explains.The results, published in PLOS Medicine, may come as a surprise. “I think it’s a little bit akin to the frog in the boiling water,” Allen says. There’s a “slow, steady — largely imperceptible — rise in temperature, and you don’t realize it’s having an impact on you.”The findings add to a growing body of evidence that documents the effect of heat on mental performance, both in schools and workplaces.For instance, a 2006 study from researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab found that when office temperatures rise above the mid-70s, workers’ performance begins to drop off. Researchers reviewed multiple studies that evaluated performance on common office tasks. The study found that worker productivity is highest at about 72 degrees. When temperatures exceeded the mid-80s, worker productivity decreased by about 9 percent.Another, more recent study compared worker performance in green-certified buildings and typical office buildings. They found a dip in cognitive function linked to conditions in the indoor environment, including higher indoor temperatures and poor lighting.And, when it comes to performance in the classroom, a study funded by the Harvard Environmental Economics Program finds that taking a standardized test on a very hot day is linked to poorer performance. The study includes an analysis of test scores from students in New York City who take a series of high-school exams called the Regents Exams.The author, R. Jisung Park, assistant professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, writes that compared with a 72-degree day, “taking an exam on a 90◦F day leads to a 10.9 percent lower likelihood of passing a particular subject (e.g. Algebra), which in turn affects probability of graduation.”There’s still a lot to learn about how our brains and bodies respond to heat. “We all tend to think we can compensate, we can do just fine” during heat waves says Allen. But he says the “evidence shows that the indoor temperature can have a dramatic impact on our ability to be productive and learn.” Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more


At the beginning of 2018 we made predictions abou

first_imgAt the beginning of 2018, we made predictions about what the year in global health and development might look like in the countries we cover.The pundits we interviewed forecast that 2018 would bring a decline in the number of health workers around the world, inspire more humanitarians to share their #MeToo stories and see more conflict that would drive the world’s humanitarian crises.Our predictors didn’t do too badly. The Lancet’s latest Global Burden of Disease study noted: “The global shortage and unequal distribution of health workers requires urgent attention.” In October, international charities gathered in London to try to tackle sexual harassment in the aid sector. And a 2018 report from UNOCHA found that “conflict remains the main driver of humanitarian needs.”So what should we expect in 2019? We reached out to pundits in global health and development and they came up with nine bold predictions.1. Positive social change will be contagious in Africa.Over the past year, Ethiopia has gone through a historic transformation at breakneck speed, reports NPR correspondent Eyder Peralta. The country welcomed a new reformist prime minister, who forged peace with former enemy Eritrea and freed thousands of political prisoners.Tobias Denskus, a professor of international development communications at Malmo University and the founder of Aidnography, a global health and development blog, thinks that could inspire other African countries. “Eritrea is one of the most isolated, autocratic and dictatorial nations,” he says. “I’m hoping that positive social change in neighboring countries like Ethiopia will lead Eritrea to do the same.” – Malaka Gharib2. Urban slums will grow.The majority of Africa’s population is young — and that so-called youth bulge will mean “more and more people will make the shift from rural to urban centers in search of jobs and opportunity and driven by changing climate,” says Kennedy Odede, co-founder and CEO of the nonprofit SHOFCO, which provides education, grassroots organizing and services like health care and water in the slums of Kenya.The changing urban landscape will be a challenge for governments. They “will have to be responsive to rapid change or risk humanitarian crises and destabilization,” Odede says. If governments do not provide better services for this new urban population, Odede says there could be an “urban spring” — protests and chaos from angry, uneducated, marginalized youth. But he is an optimist: “There is opportunity in this to harness the energy and intellect of young people.” – Marc Silver3. More countries will follow the U.S. example of pulling out of U.N. funding. On January 1, the U.S. formally left UNESCO, the United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organization. At the end of World War II, the United States helped found UNESCO to preserve the world’s heritage sites and promote the flow of ideas to prevent future conflicts. But then, UNESCO granted full membership to the Palestinians, and the U.S. stopped funding it, NPR reported.This is not the first time that the U.S. has left the U.N. heritage agency. It withdrew once before, in 1984, citing corruption and an ideological tilt toward the Soviet Union against the West, according to Foreign Policy. Tobias Denskus of Malmo University predicts that the U.S. will make further cuts: “I’m worried that as we move closer to U.S. elections, U.N. funding will suffer even more and ultimately weaken [the U.N.].” And he worries the U.S. precedent will cause other countries to reduce their contributions based on their political agenda. – Malaka Gharib4. There will be more significant infectious disease outbreaks — maybe even a pandemic … “We’re seeing a global increase in the spread of infectious diseases,” says Jennifer Nuzzo, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security who leads the Outbreak Observatory, a group that collects information about outbreaks. And she doesn’t expect a change in that pattern.”In fact,” she says, “there are worrying signs that the conditions favoring the emergence of a pandemic — and the impact it would have — are ever more present and possibly getting worse.”These conditions include increased migration that’s exposing people to diseases they’ve never encountered before, densely populated megacities and resettlement camps, vaccine refusals, compromised infrastructures as a result of humanitarian crises like conflict, natural disasters and instability as well as climate change that’s exacerbating disasters and pushing disease-bearing wildlife into new habitats. – Joanne Lu5. … but the odds are good we can beat back a bad outbreak.The ability to respond quickly to pandemics is also increasing, says Nuzzo. For example, the DRC was able to control the first phase of its Ebola outbreak in a couple of months, and there’s now an Ebola vaccine that didn’t exist four years ago when the virus swept West Africa.Still, the second phase of the outbreak – which is now the second largest and second deadliest in history – shows that political instability can stand in the way of such advances.”The case for optimism is that the emergence and spread of diseases may be inevitable, but the impacts that they have on society aren’t,” she says. “We should count on there being very significant outbreaks. Whether they become pandemics is up to us.” – Joanne Lu 6. People who need mental health help will find it on their phone.The fields of mental health and substance abuse treatments are about to take a great leap forward into the digital world, predicts psychiatrist Vikram Patel, professor of global health and social medicine at Harvard University. The solution to fighting stigma and the lack of trained counselors could be right in your pocket – a smartphone or even a plain old flip phone. Counselors with a web connection could learn about effective diagnosis and treatment online. They could ping their patients with online tips. People with depression or schizophrenia or substance abuse in rich and poor countries could use their phones to check in with a counselor, receive guidance or touch base with others facing the same issues. Researchers around the world are also testing a variety of apps. The University of Washington is working on a variety of cellphone-based training and treatment programs in Ghana, where cellphones are common and there’s a broad 3G network. The FDA is working on ways to approve digital programs for cognitive behavioral therapy. And the National Institute of Mental Health in the U.S., which is also predicting greater use of digital technology in the future, already provides a guide for finding effective mental health apps. – Joanne Silberner7. Nonprofit leadership will become more diverse.Bullying, sexual harassment and sex scandals in the humanitarian industry made headlines in 2018, from big aid agencies like UNAIDS to small nonprofits like More Than Me.One solution to this, critics have said, is to hire more diverse and qualified candidates. “Many organizations are realizing that they should diversify to represent views that have been traditionally sidelined,” says Tobias Denskus of Malmo University. “The pressure is increasing to hire more female leaders and hire capable managers from the global south, from the LGBT community who haven’t been included before.””More qualified, diverse candidates from Africa and beyond are knocking at the door,” adds Denskus — now it’s up to the aid organizations to let them in. – Malaka Gharib8. There will be fewer food crises.Dry season has begun in sub-Saharan Africa — the period from roughly November through April or May when the rains stop. As climate change has affected weather patterns, droughts have become increasingly severe.By February, “you see the faces of hungry people from Ethiopia to Kenya to South Sudan,” says Esther Ngumbi, a researcher at the University of Illinois and an Aspen Institute New Voices food security fellow.But in 2019, she is hopeful that the impact of the dry season will not be as dramatic. The reason, she says, is that countries are doing a better job equipping their farmers with water storage systems and encouraging them to plant drought-resistant crops like millet and sorghum, both highly nutritional grains, and cowpeas (aka black-eyed peas), whose seeds are high in protein.Famine and food insecurity will still be part of the 2019 landscape, especially in conflict-torn areas. But Ngumbi is predicts fewer hunger emergencies: “It’s already January, and we haven’t seen new calls for emergency relief.” – Marc Silver9. Wealthy countries will turn away more people seeking asylum. Paul Spiegel, director of the Center for Humanitarian Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, worries that there will be “an increase in denial for people seeking asylum in high-income countries.”As a result of increasing anti-immigration and anti-refugee sentiment, some countries in Europe have begun to “pay off” lower-income countries to shoulder the burden of taking in refugees, he says. In 2016, for example, Germany struck a deal with Turkey to quell the flow of refugees from Syria. In exchange for $6.8 billion, Turkey created facilities to detain refugees in camps while their asylum claims in Germany were being processed. In 2017, Italy followed suit, establishing a similar deal with Libya.Spiegel worries that programs like these will ramp up in 2019 in the U.S. and beyond. “In the U.S., we’re already having trouble with the Mexican border. What’s going to happen when Venezuelans start making their way over here?” he says. For U.S. government officials to stay in power, he predicts they too will take a tougher stance on immigration policy — adopting the idea that the U.S. must “be strong at the borders.” – Malaka GharibYour TurnGot a big, bold prediction for global health and development in 2019? Reply to this Twitter thread with your thoughts, and we’ll share a few in Goats and Soda’s newsletter next week. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more


Its that time of year again You wake up with a s

first_imgIt’s that time of year again. You wake up with a scratchy throat, stuffy nose, a little achy — maybe a fever. Is it a classic head cold, or do you need to be more concerned? Could it be the flu?”There’s lots of confusion out there, because both are viral respiratory illnesses,” says Dr. Yul Ejnes, an internal medicine specialist in private practice in Rhode Island and spokesperson for the American College of Physicians. “No one likes to get a cold, but people are more fearful of the flu.”And rightly so.Last year’s influenza season was particularly severe, resulting in an unusually high number of hospitalizations and deaths from flu complications.So, if you do have the flu, it’s important to consult with your health care provider about treatment. And distinguishing between a cold and flu may be easier than you think, Ejnes says. There are some clear distinctions between the two similar types of viral illness in terms of symptoms — how quickly they appear and how severe they become.Suddenly flattened? Think fluFlu symptoms, Ejnes says, usually start abruptly — though you can spread the virus before symptoms surface.”Patients can pretty much tell you when the symptoms hit them — after lunch, for example, or yesterday afternoon,” says Ejnes.A cold, on the other hand, takes a couple of days to build up. You may have a scratchy throat one day and then the nose starts to get stuffy the next day.You may also develop a fever with a cold. But typically, it’s a “low-grade” rise in temperature, hovering around 99 or 100 degrees Farenheit.With flu, that fever is usually significantly higher — at least 101 degrees. Chills and body aches are another flu hallmark or, as Ejnes says, “feeling like a truck ran you over — where you can’t even move a muscle.”Dragging yourself out of bed can seem impossible when you have the flu. “You’re just wiped out with total body fatigue,” he says, whereas with a cold, people often “soldier on” and get out of bed for work or social activities.Heading to work isn’t a good idea, of course, even with a mild cold, because it exposes others to the virus — but lots of people do it. (Colds tend to be most contagious in the first several days of illness.)There can be congestion and cough from the postnasal drip of a head cold, but it’s not nearly as severe as with flu. Influenza can trigger long bouts of coughing and even trouble breathing.So, when patients tell Ejnes that their symptoms developed suddenly, their fever is high and their body aches severe, he assumes flu, he says.But should those symptoms send you to the doctor? That depends, Ejnes says. If you’re a healthy adult without any chronic health problems, you may instead do fine with merely phoning your doctor, who can quickly prescribe any of several antiviral medications. That medicine is most effective when given within two days of symptoms.”It’s not a miracle drug by any stretch,” cautions Ejnes, but it can offer some relief by reducing the severity of symptoms and the duration of the illness by a day or so.Ejnes says he prefers a phone chat to a visit in such cases — partly to limit the number of people in his waiting room who have the flu.”I’ve had the most ironic scenarios, where somebody’s coming into the office to get a flu shot and — while they’re waiting to be called in — they’re sitting next to someone who’s coming in with symptoms that might be the flu.”So call first.’Red flags’ that escalate riskHowever, doctors do want people who are at high risk of developing complications to be seen by the health team when flu is suspected, says infectious disease physician Dr. Matthew Zahn. He’s the medical director of the Division of Epidemiology and Assessment for the Orange County Health Care Agency, in Southern California, and spokesperson for the Infectious Disease Society of America.This at-risk group includes children under age 5, whose immune systems are still developing; adults 65 and older, whose immune systems are waning; pregnant women; and individuals who have certain underlying medical conditions. These pre-existing conditions include asthma, chronic lung disease, heart disease, kidney disorders and liver disorders — all are known to diminish the strength of the immune system and the ability to fight off influenza.Antiviral medicine can be helpful for this group, he says, even if it is given more than two days after flu symptoms appear.And whether you get treatment or not, there are some important “red flags” to be aware of with the flu, says Zahn.Watch for “any sort of breathing problems,” he says. Coughing occasionally is one thing, but if you’re having trouble catching your breath, go see your doctor “really quickly.”Breathing problems can be symptomatic of pneumonia, a common and serious complication of the flu, in which the air sacs of one or both lungs become clogged.A sudden and significant change in mental health status with the respiratory symptoms is also a red flag, Zahn says. If you or a loved one have trouble focusing or are not as alert as normal, make your way to a doctor right away.Flu shots aren’t just for the kids and grandpaWhile antiviral medication can reduce symptoms, infectious disease specialists agree that the best way to prevent the flu is to get the flu vaccine.”Each year we have tens of thousands of people die of flu,” Zahn says, and the vaccine can help prevent that. While flu seasons are unpredictable and strains of the virus mutate from year to year, vaccines can still be anywhere from 40 percent to 60 percent effective in preventing severe complications and hospitalization.Vaccination rates against flu are highest among Americans 65 and older and among children 4 and younger, he says, but most others could benefit from a flu shot, too. And that’s not happening — among American adults aged 18 to 64, typically less than half get immunized.Of course, it’s best to get your flu vaccine at the beginning of flu season — in the fall — but it’s not too late. The influenza season runs throughout winter.As for treating a cold, well, you’re pretty much out of luck.”The reality is nothing is available to shorten the duration of a head cold,” says internist Ejnes.Over-the-counter medication can ease symptoms, he says. Decongestants can help reduce cough, nasal sprays can help reduce stuffiness, and lozenges can help relieve a sore throat.”Some folks have more luck with these OTC remedies than others,” Ejnes says.Then there is the ever-popular chicken soup, which can help you feel better — especially if there’s lots of steam, which can help clear up nasal congestion.But, bottom line, Ejnes says patients just have to do whatever they can to ease symptoms until the cold runs its course — usually in seven to 10 days. “There’s nothing we can do to speed that process up.” Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more


Labour has published an election manifesto that in

first_imgLabour has published an election manifesto that includes pledges on social care and welfare reform, but offers few new policies on disability rights.The manifesto says Labour is the “party of equality” and that that “no person should suffer discrimination or a lack of opportunity”.But it warns that, with the exception of the “protected” areas of health, education and international development, “there will be cuts in spending” under a Labour government.It promises reform of the work capability assessment (WCA), the test introduced by the last Labour government in 2008 to assess eligibility for employment and support allowance (ESA), with a new focus on the “support disabled people need to get into work”, and a new independent scrutiny group of disabled people set up to monitor the WCA.There will also be a new specialist support programme “to ensure that disabled people who can work get more tailored help”.And Labour promises to abolish the “bedroom tax”, which it says is “cruel”, with two-thirds of those affected by cuts in housing benefit being disabled people or families with a disabled member. The manifesto also promises that a Labour government would abolish the employment tribunal fee system introduced by the coalition, improve training for teachers on working with disabled children, and strengthen the law on disability, homophobic, and transphobic hate crime.On social care, the manifesto focuses on older people and carers, rather than disabled people of working-age, saying: “Care is at the heart of Labour’s values. No-one should fear old age or be left to struggle alone caring for a loved one.”Since 2010, it warns, billions of pounds have been cut from adult social care budgets, which it says has left “300,000 fewer older people getting vital care services, at the same time as the number of older people in need of care is increasing”.As with the Conservatives, the Greens, the Liberal Democrats and UKIP, Labour promises to integrate the health and social care systems, while also focusing on mental health.The manifesto says that “vulnerable older people, disabled people and those with complex needs will be helped to have more control of their lives”, with the entitlement to a personal care plan, the option of a personal budget “where appropriate”, and a single named person to coordinate their care, as well as “better information and advice on managing their condition”.It also pledges to end time-limited, 15-minute social care visits, introducing instead “year-of-care budgets” that would cover all of a person’s physical, mental health and social care needs and improve care in people’s own homes, and recruiting 5,000 new home-care workers – under the control of the NHS – to “help care for those with the greatest needs at home”.A separate health and care manifesto promises to do more to ensure that people with mental health problems, learning difficulties and autism “enjoy the same rights as anyone else”, with “meaningful progress” for these groups a priority.It also promises to consult on a new offence of corporate neglect for directors of care homes, which could mean a prison sentence if they neglect or are involved in abuse of people in their care.Disability News Service contacted disabled Labour candidates Emily Brothers and Mary Griffiths-Clarke for their views on the manifesto, but they failed to respond.But Dame Anne Begg (pictured), the disabled Labour candidate standing in Aberdeen South, was able to comment, although the Scottish Labour manifesto had not yet been published.She said Labour’s promise to strengthen the law on disability hate crime was “very welcome”, as was the section on supporting disabled people to live independently, including the abolition of the bedroom tax.She said: “There is also a promise to set up an independent scrutiny group of disabled people to look at how the WCA could be reformed.  “I would like any Labour government to go further on this, as I think a fundamental rethink [of the WCA] is required and so would hope any scrutiny group would have a role in this.“I am also glad there is an acknowledgement that there needs to be a specialist programme to give tailored help to disabled people seeking work.“Those on ESA are not well served by the present Work Programme and [the specialist programme for disabled people] Work Choice.”Dame Anne added: “I also think the plans to set up a single service to meet all the needs of a person’s health and care needs will be welcomed by disabled people, as they are often the people who are passed from one service to another and sometimes fall between the cracks.”She also praised Labour’s focus on a right to access talking therapies for people with mental health problems, which she said was “particularly important for those who are trying to get back in to, or remain, in work and used to be a feature of the Pathways to Work scheme the last Labour government had in place and which the coalition government scrapped.”last_img read more


Stream Your Music Collection Over the Net

first_imgTechnology July 21, 2008 Next Article 6 min read Stream Your Music Collection Over the Net Listen to your favorite tunes anywhere, anytime, by putting your entire music library online. It’s easy, and we show you how. Brought to you by PCWorld We’re living in the Internet Age, so what good is a music collection that’s trapped inside your home PC? Your songs should be able to go where you go, be it the office, a friend’s house, an airport lounge, or even the backseat of a taxi.Fortunately, liberating your song library is easier than you might think, so you can stream it from your PC or the Web to just about anyplace. Better still, unlike a new iPod, it won’t cost you a cent.There are lots of ways to get to your music via the Net, but I’m going to show you two distinct methods using fantastic freebies. MP3tunes, a Web-based service, houses your music collection online. Meanwhile, Orb streams songs straight from your PC to nearly any Internet-connected device–including some cell phones. Which one is the better choice for you? As it turns out, you might want to tap both. Read on, and I’ll explain why.Store Your Music Online with MP3tunesMP3tunes makes a mighty generous offer: The service will store up to 25 gigabytes of your music files free of charge. Once you’ve uploaded your collection, you can sign in to your account from any Web-connected PC and stream to your heart’s content–complete with playlists and auto-generated mixes. What’s more, MP3tunes effectively doubles as an online backup for your collection, a great insurance policy against hard-drive disaster.Start by signing up for an account, which gives you an MP3tunes “locker.” (If your collection exceeds 25GB or you want advertising-free access, a 50GB premium account will run you $40 annually. Other plans are available if you need even more storage.) Next, download LockerSync 3.0 from MP3tunes’ Downloads section. This utility keeps your local music library in sync with your online music locker. It’s available for Windows, Mac, and Linux operating systems.You can let LockerSync scan your entire system for music or set it to monitor and sync specific folders. Then it’s just a matter of waiting while the software copies your tunes to MP3tunes’ servers. And there’s the rub: Depending on the size of your collection, it can take a few days of 24/7 uploading to finish the job. That’s not MP3tunes’ fault: Internet service providers typically throttle upstream performance, devoting most of the available bandwidth to downloads.Fortunately, once you’ve completed the initial upload, subsequent syncs should go much faster (assuming you add only a few songs or albums at a time). And you can start streaming music from your locker even while uploads are underway. The MP3tunes player runs in a browser window and offers familiar controls, including shuffle and repeat modes and a playlist builder. Mouse over any song in the track list to play, download, or trash it, or to add it to a playlist. You can even edit a song’s metadata.Its name notwithstanding, MP3tunes doesn’t limit you to MP3s: It can stream most unprotected audio formats, including AAC, Ogg, and WMA. Of course, that leaves out DRM-laden songs purchased from iTunes and other stores, but that’s to be expected. To avoid the hassles of DRM–on MP3tunes and throughout your digital life–I recommend either buying CDs or purchasing from DRM-free online stores such as Amazon. (For more on DRM-free music, see Dan Tynan’s “Four Ways to Reclaim Your Digital Rights”.)On the plus side, MP3tunes offers a browser plug-in that lets you add songs straight to your locker from any site that hosts MP3s (or from the company’s own Sideload site, which aggregates songs from around the Web).Stream Music From Your PC With OrbWhile you’re waiting for MP3tunes to upload all your music, consider installing Orb. This free service turns your PC into a media server, streaming not only songs, but also video, photos, and even TV, to just about any Web-connected device. That means you can tap your music library from your work PC, your Palm Centro, your Nintendo Wii, or your iPhone–to name just a few of the supported gadgets.The Orb software client requires Windows XP or later and a broadband Internet connection. (If you want to add TV to the streaming mix, you’ll need a TV tuner as well–check Orb’s FAQ page for a list of supported models.) Once Orb is installed, configure the software to monitor the system folders containing your music (and, if desired, photos and videos). The software will also help you sign up for an Orb account, which requires nothing more than a user name, a password, and an e-mail address.With the Orb client up and running, you’re ready to stream. The hitch, of course, is that you’ll need to leave your computer on at all times. If it’s configured to go into power-saving sleep mode, no problem: Orb can transmit a “wake-up” command that should get your machine out of bed. (You may need to tweak the BIOS and/or ethernet adapter settings to enable the Wake on LAN option, which makes this kind of remote control possible.)To listen to your tunes, fire up the Web browser on the device you’re using–a PC, your smart phone, a game console, or whatever–and then head over to mycast.orb.com. The Orb interface varies depending on the device you use to access it; a PC affords the richest experience, a customizable portal where you can access not just music, but also weather, news, games, and RSS feeds. Click Audio-Random if you just want to shuffle-play your song library, or click the Open Application button, and then Audio, for a familiar media-player interface.Orb is by no means the only option for streaming music from your PC; others include JukeFly, SqueezeCenter, and Vibe Streamer. Like Orb, these services cost nothing to use, but they stream only music–no video or photos–and their support for mobile devices is limited, or zero. Plus, Orb is a snap to set up and use, making it the obvious choice if you want anytime, anywhere access to your tunes. Apply Now » 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List –shares The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Add to Queuelast_img read more


Big Business Leaders Urge Repeal of Mississippi Law Opposed by LGBT Community

first_img April 7, 2016 Enroll Now for $5 Add to Queue This story originally appeared on Reuters Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Big Business Leaders Urge Repeal of Mississippi Law Opposed by LGBT Community Laws 3 min read Executives of several major U.S. corporations urged Mississippi on Wednesday to repeal a new state law that allows businesses to deny wedding services to same-sex couples on religious grounds.The measure, which also permits employers to cite principles of faith in setting workplace policies on dress code, grooming and bathroom access, was signed into law on Tuesday by Republican Gov. Phil Bryant.Bryant hailed the statute, the latest in a series of state laws opposed by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) activists, as designed to “protect sincerely held religious beliefs and moral convictions … from discriminatory action by state government.”But top executives from General Electric Co., PepsiCo Inc., Dow Chemical Co. and five other major U.S. corporations, in an open letter, condemned the law as discriminatory. The letter was addressed to Bryant and the speaker of the Republican-controlled Mississippi House of Representatives.”The business community, by and large, has consistently communicated to lawmakers at every level that such laws are bad for our employees and bad for business,” the executives said.Those measures, they said, make it more difficult to recruit and retain the best workers, and “diminish the state’s draw as a destination for tourism, new businesses and economic cavity.”The call for repeal, circulated by gay rights advocacy group the Human Rights Campaign, was also backed by Levis Strauss & Co., Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Whole Foods Market, Hyatt Hotels Corp and Choice Hotels International Inc.A similar letter was sent on Wednesday to state leaders in Tennessee opposing legislation there to bar transgender people from choosing bathrooms and locker rooms consistent with their gender identity. North Carolina’s own recently imposed bathroom gender restrictions have also prompted corporate objections.The governors of Georgia and Virginia also vetoed “religious liberty” bills last week.Even before its enactment, the Mississippi measure drew fire from several large employers in the state, including Nissan North America and MGM Resorts International.New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo responded to its enactment by banning all non-essential state travel to Mississippi, and civil liberties advocates said they were considering a court challenge.Still, nearly two-thirds of Mississippi voters supported the law, according to a poll highlighted on Tuesday by the Christian-based Family Research Council.The wave of such measures, pushed by social conservatives, came after a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year that legalized same-sex marriage nationwide.(By Therese Apel; Additional reporting by Colleen Jenkins in Winston-Salem, N.C.; Writing by Steve Gorman in Los Angeles; Editing by Richard Chang) Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand 46shares Image credit: Reuters | Mike Blake Next Article Reuters Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant (left).last_img read more


US Astronauts Prepare Station for Commercial Space Taxis

first_img Image credit: NASA via Reuters Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business –shares Reuters Next Article 2 min read Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Register Now » NASA U.S. Astronauts Prepare Station for Commercial Space Taxis August 22, 2016 Two NASA astronauts completed a six-hour spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Friday to install a parking spot for upcoming commercial space taxis, which will end U.S. reliance on Russia for rides to the orbiting outpost.Station commander Jeff Williams and flight engineer Kate Rubins floated outside the station’s airlock and headed toward the berthing slip once used by NASA’s now-retired space shuttles, a NASA TV broadcast showed.”Great view,” said Rubins, who made her first spacewalk.Since grounding the shuttle fleet in 2011, the United States has been dependent on Russia to ferry astronauts to and from the space station, at a cost of more than $70 million per person.During Friday’s spacewalk, Williams and Rubins attached an adapter onto the shuttle’s docking port that will allow commercial space taxis under development by Space Exploration Technologies and Boeing to park at the station, a $100 billion research laboratory that flies about 250 miles (400 km) above Earth.”It’s a gateway to a new era in commercial space,” said NASA mission commentator Rob Navias.California-based SpaceX, owned and operated by technology entrepreneur Elon Musk, plans to begin test flights of its new passenger Dragon capsule to the station in 2017.Boeing’s debut flight of its CST-100 Starliner capsule is expected in 2018.NASA had hoped to have the first of two new docking ports installed last year, but the equipment was destroyed during a SpaceX cargo ship launch accident in June 2015.A replacement docking port is under construction and expected to be delivered to the station in early 2018.On Friday, Williams and Rubins routed a cable for the second docking port’s installation in early 2018.The astronauts had planned to tackle a few other lower-priority maintenance tasks, but NASA decided to end the spacewalk after an intermittent communications problem developed with Williams’ spacesuit, Navias said.Williams and Rubins are scheduled to make another spacewalk on Sept. 1 to retract a solar array cooling panel that is no longer being used and to install a high-definition television camera on the station’s exterior frame.(Reporting by Irene Klotz in Cairns, Australia; Editing by Colleen Jenkins, Paul Simao and Chizu Nomiyama) This story originally appeared on Reuters NASA astronaut Jeff Williams works inside the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) attached to the International Space Station. Add to Queuelast_img read more


MGID Adds Sellersjson and Support for OpenRTB SupplyChain Object to Drive Increased

first_img IAB Tech LabMarketing Technology NewsMGIDNewsOpenRTBSellers.jsonTAG Previous ArticleSYZYGY Awarded IAB Gold Standard 1.1Next ArticleFlipboard Appoints Advertising Industry Veteran David Bell As New Board Member MGID Adds Sellers.json and Support for OpenRTB SupplyChain Object to Drive Increased Trust and Transparency MTS Staff WriterJuly 16, 2019, 9:30 pmJuly 16, 2019 MGID becomes one of the first platforms to adopt the new IAB Tech Lab solutions to provide greater confidence in its offeringMGID, the global pioneer in native advertising, has announced it is starting work to become one of the first ad tech companies to start posting the sellers.json file on its supply platform domains, and will support the OpenRTB SupplyChain object, to give buyers a better understanding of the inventory they are bidding on.Released by the IAB Tech Lab in April 2019 for public comment, sellers.json allows buyers to see a list of the authorized sellers and resellers an exchange or SSP works with. Similarly, SupplyChain object provides a record of what has happened to an impression, so buyers can see which sellers and resellers are involved in the bid request, giving more transparency and greater end-to-end visibility in the supply chain.Marketing Technology News: VaaS and USB are Helping to Drive Growth in the Video Conferencing & Collaboration MarketMGID already implements a number of IAB guidelines and IAB Tech Lab supply chain standards, as well as being a verified company by the Trustworthy Accountability Group (TAG), and ComScore. By being one of the first native platforms to provide sellers.json and support for OpenRTB SupplyChain object, MGID further demonstrates its commitment to providing a safe and clean environment for the buyers it works with.Sergii Denysenko, Chief Executive Officer at MGID Global, comments: “This initiative will help bridge the gap between advertisers and publishers by bringing much needed transparency to the ad tech ecosystem. MGID has always rooted for supply chain optimization, and while ads.txt started the process of building more trust in the ecosystem, sellers.json and SupplyChain object is the next evolutionary step to providing clarity to the entire supply chain.”Marketing Technology News: DTiQ Launches Enhanced Video Analytics Capabilities“These two specifications are critical to increasing trust and transparency in programmatic advertising, and will be key in helping fight fraud,” said Dennis Buchheim, Executive Vice President and General Manager, IAB Tech Lab. “Together, sellers.json and the SupplyChain object will provide better supply path visibility for buyers and sellers, giving them greater confidence during transactions. We look forward to seeing widespread adoption once the final versions are released.”Marketing Technology News: Speedcast and In Aria! Networks Join Forces with Telespazio on Large-Scale, High-Capacity Video Serviceslast_img read more


Online and inperson care found to be equally effective at improving psoriasis

first_img Source:https://www.keckmedicine.org/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 7 2018For approximately 8 million Americans, visiting a doctor regularly is the key to managing their psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory skin condition characterized by itchy or painful red patches that can appear anywhere on the body. But for some people, seeing a specialist regularly can be a monumental challenge, especially for those who live in rural or underserved communities. A new study led by the Keck School of Medicine of USC, however, raises the possibility that one day, people with psoriasis may be able to simply go online to receive their care. Published today in JAMA Network Open, the study found that online and in-person care were equally effective at improving psoriasis symptoms.”Patients with chronic skin diseases need ongoing care, and depending on where they live, their access to dermatological care can be variable,” says the study’s lead author April Armstrong, MD, MPH, professor of dermatology (clinical scholar) and associate dean for clinical research at the Keck School. “Our study suggests that an online care delivery model is an effective way to bring high-quality care to patients regardless of where they live or what their work/life schedules look like.”Related StoriesNewly discovered bacteria-killing protein on the epidermis requires vitamin A to workAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaResearchers investigate causal relationship between higher BMI and psoriasisIn the multicenter study, Armstrong and her colleagues followed nearly 300 patients who had been randomized to either online or in-person care and monitored their symptom improvement.Patients assigned to online care logged in to a secure, web-based connected health platform where they could communicate with their primary care provider or dermatologist, share images of their skin and receive treatment recommendations. After reviewing transmitted information, health care providers evaluated patients’ progress, provided patient education and prescribed medications electronically. Patients assigned to in-person care received treatment as usual.Psoriasis severity was measured at baseline and again at three, six, nine and 12 months. Across the follow-up visits, the two groups achieved similar improvement in psoriasis severity scores.”From a patient’s perspective, there are several benefits to an online care delivery model: They don’t need to travel to a facility with specialty care, they can receive high-quality specialty care at home and they can communicate with their doctor at a time that’s convenient for them,” Armstrong says. “From a provider’s perspective, the benefits include flexibility in where and when they work.”While this study focused on patients with psoriasis, Armstrong believes that the online care model has other potential applications as well.”The use of teledermatology needs to be considered in other patient populations with chronic skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis. There is a critical need for children and adults with atopic dermatitis to receive high-quality specialist care for this condition through novel telehealth delivery methods,” she says.last_img read more


Advanced breast cancer patients can benefit from immunotherapychemotherapy combination

first_img Source:https://www.upmc.com/media/news/102018-emens-nejm-trial Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 23 2018Patients with an aggressive form of advanced breast cancer can benefit from immunotherapy when used in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment, according to the results of a large international Phase III clinical trial published today in the New England Journal of Medicine and led by a researcher at the UPMC Hillman Cancer Center and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.The study is the first large clinical trial to support the use of immunotherapy in treating triple-negative breast cancer and establishes a new standard of care in PD-L1+ patients, senior trial investigator and study author Leisha Emens, M.D., Ph.D., co-leader of the UPMC Hillman Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy Program, explained. Results were presented today at the annual meeting of the European Society for Medical Oncology in Munich, Germany.Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, with an estimated 2 million new cases diagnosed in 2018 alone. About 10 to 20 percent of patients have triple-negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of breast cancer that has a higher chance of recurrence and metastasis, and lower survival.”While chemotherapy is the current standard of treatment for triple-negative breast cancer, there is an urgent need for newer, more effective therapies,” said Emens. “The results of this trial showed that adding the immunotherapy drug atezolizumab to chemotherapy was well-tolerated and resulted in a clear increase in clinical benefit for some patients with triple-negative breast cancer.”The IMpassion130 trial was designed to evaluate whether atezolizumab, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat both bladder cancer and non-small cell lung cancer, could be used along with chemotherapy to improve clinical outcomes in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Atezolizumab belongs to a class of immunotherapy medications known as checkpoint inhibitors. The drug targets the PD-L1 protein, which in triple-negative breast cancer patients is found mostly on immune cells that infiltrate the tumor. Blocking PD-L1 reinvigorates these immune cells, allowing them to attack the tumor.The trial enrolled 902 patients with either metastatic or locally advanced triple-negative breast cancer that could not be surgically removed. Patients were enrolled at 246 sites in 41 countries across the world and were randomly assigned to receive either atezolizumab or a placebo, along with the chemotherapy drug nab-paclitaxel.Related StoriesUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerLiving with advanced breast cancerAI-enabled device detects if targeted chemotherapy is workingBoth progression-free survival–the length of time the patient lives after receiving the therapy without the tumor growing or spreading, and overall survival–the length of time the patient survives from the start of the trial, were recorded.In the overall patient population, the researchers found a statistically significant increase in progression-free survival in patients treated with both nab-paclitaxel and atezolizumab – 7.2 months when compared to 5.5 months in patients who received chemotherapy alone. In the group of patients who expressed the PD-L1 protein on tumor-infiltrating immune cells, the combination treatment had a more significant impact on progression-free survival – 7.5 months versus 5 months.Overall survival was 21.3 months in the combination treatment group as compared to 17.6 months with chemotherapy alone, though this did not reach statistical significance in this first analysis. In the group of patients who expressed PD-L1 on their tumors, the difference in survival was greater, with overall survival of 25 months, in contrast to 15.5 months in patients treated with nab-paclitaxel alone.”This improvement in progression-free and overall survival is clinically meaningful in patients with advanced PD-L1+ triple-negative breast cancer,” Emens said. The researchers continue to follow the patients to determine overall survival over a longer time period.The adverse events observed were similar to the known adverse event profile of the two drugs. Patients who received both immunotherapy and nab-paclitaxel experienced a higher frequency of adverse events that were potentially immune-related, than those who received chemotherapy alone, at 7.5 percent versus 4.3 percent, respectively.The trial was funded by F. Hoffmann-La Roche/Genentech, which provided atezolizumab and placebo and collaborated with an academic steering committee regarding the trial design and data collection, analysis and interpretation. Celgene provided nab-paclitaxel and had no role in the trial design, data collection or analysis, but did review the manuscript.A complete listing of the authors and their affiliations, along with the financial disclosure forms provided by the authors can be found with the article online.last_img read more


Exercise may decrease cerebral blood flow and improve brain function in older

first_img Source:https://sph.umd.edu/news-item/exercise-may-improve-cognition-reducing-brain-blood-flow-older-adults Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 31 2019Exercise can impact biomarkers of brain function in a way that might prevent or postpone the onset of dementiaExercise training alters brain blood flow and improves cognitive performance in older adults, though not in the way you might think. A new study published by University of Maryland School of Public Health researchers in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease showed that exercise was associated with improved brain function in a group of adults diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and a decrease in the blood flow in key brain regions.”A reduction in blood flow may seem a little contrary to what you would assume happens after going on an exercise program,” explained Dr. J. Carson Smith, associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology. “But after 12-weeks of exercise, adults with MCI experienced decreases in cerebral blood flow. They simultaneously improved significantly in their scores on cognitive tests.”Dr. Smith explains that for those beginning to experience subtle memory loss, the brain is in “crisis mode” and may try to compensate for the inability to function optimally by increasing cerebral blood flow. While elevated cerebral blood flow is usually considered beneficial to brain function, there is evidence to suggest it may actually be a harbinger of further memory loss in those diagnosed with MCI. The results of the study by Dr. Smith and his team suggest exercise may have the potential to reduce this compensatory blood flow and improve cognitive efficiency in those in the very early stages of Alzheimer’s Disease.A control group of cognitively healthy older adults without mild cognitive impairment also underwent the exercise training program, consisting of four 30-minute sessions of moderate-intensity treadmill walking per week. But the program yielded different responses from each group.Related StoriesLiver fat biomarker levels linked with metabolic health benefits of exercise, study findsImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsExtremely strenuous exercise can overload the heart without increasing cardiac riskUnlike the group with MCI, whose exercise training decreased cerebral blood flow, the exercise training increased cerebral blood flow in the frontal cortex in the healthy group after 12 weeks. Their performance on the cognitive tests also significantly improved, as was observed the MCI group.For this study, changes in cerebral blood flow were measured in specific brain regions that are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, including the insula (involved in perception, motor control, self-awareness, cognitive functioning), the anterior cingulate cortex (involved in decision making , anticipation, impulse control and emotion) and the inferior frontal gyrus (involved in language processing and speech).Specifically, among those with MCI, the decreased cerebral blood flow in the left insula and in the left anterior cingulate cortex were strongly correlated with improved performance on a word association test used to measure memory and cognitive health.A previous publication from this study led by Dr. Smith focused on how the exercise intervention influenced changes in the brain’s neural networks known to be associated with memory loss and amyloid accumulation, which are both signs of MCI and Alzheimer’s.”Our findings provide evidence that exercise can improve brain function in people who already have cognitive decline,” Dr. Smith said optimistically. “We have an interest in targeting people who are at increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s earlier in the disease process. We are seeing that exercise can impact biomarkers of brain function in a way that might protect people by preventing or postponing the onset of dementia.”last_img read more


Nissan launches Chinafocused electric car

first_imgReporters take pictures of a Nissan Sylphy Zero Emission, the Nissan’s first all-electric vehicle built in China, at the Nissan factory in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, Monday, Aug. 27, 2018. The Sylphy is part of a wave of dozens of electric models planned by global automakers for China where the government is pressing them to accelerate development of the technology. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) A worker of Dongfeng Nissan, right, wears a uniform with a pin with Chinese words “Communist party member” attends the ceremony of launching Nissan Sylphy Zero Emission, the Nissan’s first all-electric vehicle built in China, in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, Monday, Aug. 27, 2018. The Sylphy is part of a wave of dozens of electric models planned by global automakers for China, where the government is pressing them to accelerate development of the technology. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) Manufacturers including General Motors and Volkswagen are poised this year to launch a flood of electric sedans, minivans and SUVs in China designed for local tastes and smaller budgets. Nissan, Tesla, GM and others sell imported electrics or electrified versions of models made by Chinese partners, but the market is dominated by low-cost local rivals including BYD Auto.China’s government sees electric cars as a promising industry and a way to clean up its smog choked cities. It has spent heavily on subsidies to Chinese producers and is shifting the burden to automakers with sales quotas and tougher fuel efficiency standards.The Sylphy Zero Emission, based on Nissan’s leaf, is being produced by Nissan Motor Co. and a Chinese partner, Dongfeng Motor group.The Sylphy costs 166,000 yuan ($25,850) after government subsidies, or just over half the sticker price of the Chinese version of the Leaf sold by Nissan and Dongfeng’s joint venture Venucia brand. Nissan says the Sylphy can go 338 kilometers (210 miles) on a charge. Hiroto Saikawa, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd’s president and CEO, right, and Zhu Yanfeng, Chairman and Party Secretary of Dongfeng Motor Group Co., Ltd, left, pose during the launching of the Nissan Sylphy Zero Emission, the Nissan’s first all-electric vehicle built in China, in China, in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, Monday, Aug. 27, 2018. The Sylphy is part of a wave of dozens of electric models planned by global automakers for China, where the government is pressing them to accelerate development of the technology. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) A worker of Dongfeng Nissan, right, wears a uniform with a pin with Chinese words “Communist party member” attends the ceremony of launching Nissan Sylphy Zero Emission, the Nissan’s first all-electric vehicle built in China, in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, Monday, Aug. 27, 2018. The Sylphy is part of a wave of dozens of electric models planned by global automakers for China, where the government is pressing them to accelerate development of the technology. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) 5 things to know about Tesla’s China plans Hiroto Saikawa, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd’s president and CEO, right, and Zhu Yanfeng, Chairman and Party Secretary of Dongfeng Motor Group Co., Ltd, left, attend the ceremony of the launching of the Nissan Sylphy Zero Emission, the Nissan’s first all-electric vehicle built in China, in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, Monday, Aug. 27, 2018. The Sylphy is part of a wave of dozens of electric models planned by global automakers for China, where the government is pressing them to accelerate development of the technology. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) The Chinese government announced in April it would end restrictions on foreign ownership of electric vehicle manufacturers this year in an effort to promote development.Producers including GM and Nissan had been reluctant to transfer manufacturing to China due to the requirement to share technology with Chinese partners that might become rivals.Freed of that requirement, Tesla Inc. announced in July it would build its first factory outside the United States in Shanghai, becoming the first wholly foreign-owned automaker in China.Other automakers are working through ventures with Chinese partners, hoping to take advantage of their experience at developing lower-cost vehicles.Chinese sales in July of pure electric and gasoline-electric hybrids, boosted by subsidies and other government support, rose 47.7 percent over a year to 84,000. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. “By the end of this year, things will be different,” said Zhang. “We really will see the market become more competitive and consumers will have more to choose.”Government plans call for total annual sales of 2 million electric and gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles by 2020, up from last year’s 770,000. Workers of the Dongfeng Nissan attend the ceremony launching the Nissan Sylphy Zero Emission, the Nissan’s first all-electric vehicle built in China, in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, Monday, Aug. 27, 2018. The Sylphy is part of a wave of dozens of electric models planned by global automakers for China, where the government is pressing them to accelerate development of the technology. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) Hiroto Saikawa, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd’s president and CEO, right, and Zhu Yanfeng, Chairman and Party Secretary of Dongfeng Motor Group Co., Ltd, left, attend the ceremony of the launching of the Nissan Sylphy Zero Emission, the Nissan’s first all-electric vehicle built in China, in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, Monday, Aug. 27, 2018. The Sylphy is part of a wave of dozens of electric models planned by global automakers for China, where the government is pressing them to accelerate development of the technology. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) A cameraman takes video of a Nissan Sylphy Zero Emission, the Nissan’s first all-electric vehicle built in China, at the Nissan factory in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, Monday, Aug. 27, 2018. The Sylphy is part of a wave of dozens of electric models planned by global automakers for China where the government is pressing them to accelerate development of the technology. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. GM says it will roll out 10 electric and hybrid models in China from 2016 to 2020. It says 2025, all its Buick, Cadillac and Chevrolet models in China will offer hybrid or pure-electric versions.Tesla says China is its second-largest market. But a high sticker price has limited sales by other foreign brands to a few hundred vehicles. Citation: Nissan launches China-focused electric car (2018, August 27) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-nissan-china-focused-electric-car.html Nissan’s first electric sedan designed for China began production Monday at the start of a wave of dozens of planned lower-cost electrics being created by global automakers for their biggest market. Chinese workers inspect a Nissan Sylphy Zero Emission, Nissan’s first all-electric vehicle built in China, at a production line in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, Monday, Aug. 27, 2018. The Sylphy is part of a wave of dozens of electric models planned by global automakers for China, where the government is pressing them to accelerate development of the technology. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) Explore further A worker inspects a Nissan Sylphy Zero Emission, Nissan’s first all-electric vehicle built in China, at a production line in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, Monday, Aug. 27, 2018. The Sylphy is part of a wave of dozens of electric models planned by global automakers for China where the government is pressing them to accelerate development of the technology. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) “We’re confident that the Sylphy Zero Emission rolling off the production line today will become a main player in the EV market,” said Nissan CEO Hiroto Saikawa. “We’re going to roll out a range of EVs that will appeal to customers within all market segments.”Sales quotas that take effect next year require every brand to sell electrics or buy credits from competitors that do. That puts pressure on automakers to create models Chinese consumers want and can afford.China accounted for half of global electric car sales last year, but almost all of those came from Chinese brands including BYD Auto and BAIC Group. Their prices start as low as 140,000 yuan ($22,000).”Basically, all these international giants are testing the water. They have not really launched their heavyweight models in China yet,” said industry analyst Yale Zhang of Automotive Foresight.last_img read more


Fugitive Bear Escapes Jail Cell Scales 3 Electric Fences and Is Now

first_imgThere’s a fugitive on the loose in northern Italy. He’s skilled at scaling electric fences, goes by the name of M49, weighs 300 lbs. (136 kilograms) and is very, very fluffy. That’s right — northern Italy’s most wanted fugitive is a bear. Deemed a danger to humans and wildlife, M49 was captured in the Trentino region of northern Italy on Sunday and placed in a high-security enclosure with other “so-called problem bears,” the Trentino Press Office said in a statement. But mere walls couldn’t contain M49. Within hours, the bear had scaled all three electric fences, plus a 13-foot (4.3 meters) barrier and vanished without a trace. A search team of park rangers and sniffer dogs is scouring the region for M49, whose tracking collar was removed upon his capture. Trentino Gov. Maurizio Fugatti gave the rangers permission to shoot the bear if they encounter him, explaining in a translated statement that the bear’s escape over a fence “carrying 7,000 volts shows how dangerous it is.” [8 Human-Animal Encounters That Went Horribly Wrong]Advertisement The World Wildlife Fund for Nature Italy disagreed. In a statement, representatives from the group said the fence was most likely “not working properly, since bears do not fly.” A camera trap image of DJ3, another “problem bear” from the Trentino region of Italy. Credit: Trentino Press Office A camera trap image of escaped bear M49. The fugitive bear escaped an enclosure where he was being held. Credit: Trentino Press Office Italian Twitter is following M49’s escape with baited breath, and users appear to be on the side of the fluffy fugitive. The hashtag “#fugaperlaliberta,” which means “#escapeforfreedom” in Italian, is trending on Twitter. Brown bears are native to the Italian Alps but were nearly extinct in the region by the early 20th century. In the late 1990s, conservationists brought 10 brown bears to Italy from Slovenia. That population of 10 has since grown to between 50 and 60 bears. Since the reintroduction effort, bears in the region have frequently come into contact with humans. In 2017, one bear startled an Italian village when the animal lowered itself into an alley and barreled through the town, The Telegraph reported. That same year, another bear was shot when it mauled an elderly man walking his dog. 7 Iconic Animals Humans Are Driving to Extinction Image Gallery: Beastly Bears | Photos of Bears The World’s Biggest Beasts: Here and Gone Trentino authorities could have prevented interaction between M49 and humans by setting up electric fences outside of populated areas, biologist Luigi Boitani from Rome’s La Sapienza University told Italian media, Phys.org reported. That said, the electrified enclosure was never going to contain “a large, adult and spirited male bear,” Boitani said. (His statement was translated from Italian.) Originally published on Live Science.last_img read more


Iran cleric says UK will be slapped in the face for seizure

first_img Related News DUBAI (Reuters) – Britain will soon be “slapped in the face” for the capture of an Iranian supertanker last week, Iranian state TV quoted a cleric as saying on Friday, amid heightened tension between Iran and the West in the Gulf. World 08 Jul 2019 Iran’s Zarif calls on UK to immediately release captured oil tanker World 08 Jul 2019 Iran’s defence minister says Britain’s seizure of oil tanker was threatening act World 10 Jul 2019 Rouhani says Britain to face ‘consequences’ for seizing Iranian tankercenter_img “Iran’s strong establishment will soon slap Britain in the face for daring to seize the Iranian oil tanker,” cleric Kazem Sedighi told worshippers during Tehran’s Friday prayer sermon, TV reported.Earlier Iran called on Britain to immediately release the oil tanker that British Royal Marines seized last week on suspicion it was breaking European sanctions by taking oil to Syria. (Writing by Parisa Hafezi; Editing by Peter Graff) {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Related Newslast_img read more