10 months agoLiverpool boss Klopp confident after Bayern Munich draw

first_imgLiverpool boss Klopp confident after Bayern Munich drawby Ansser Sadiq10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool manager Jurgen Klopp knows his side face a tough two games against Bayern Munich in the Champions League.The Reds were drawn against the German champions in the Round of 16.”For me it’s nice going to Germany. This is a different Bayern than what I played, we are already here for three years,” Klopp told Liverpoolfc.com.”We all know the stadium, the atmosphere will be great. It’s a really nice trip for all our supporters, it’s a wonderful city, so that’s all good.”The flight is not too long and we obviously know more about German football than about any other league.”In the last couple of years they have dominated the German league in the best period of German football. It’s obviously long ago that I played Bayern in a competitive game so I’m really looking forward to it.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more


Rep Wakeman schedules local office hours

first_img State Rep. Rodney Wakeman of Saginaw Township will host district office hours on Saturday, April 27 and Monday, April 29 to meet with local residents of the 94th District.“I look forward to every opportunity to talk with you and hear your thoughts,” Rep. Wakeman said. “Office hours allow me to have one-on-one conversations about the issues you care about most.”Office hours are scheduled for the following times and locations:Saturday, April 27 from 1 to 2 p.m. at Wickson Memorial Library, 359 S. Franklin St. in Frankenmuth; andMonday, April 29 from 1 to 2 p.m. at St. Charles District Library, 104 W. Spruce St. in St. Charles.No appointment is necessary. Residents unable to attend may contact Rep. Wakeman’s office by calling (517) 373-0837 or by email at RodneyWakeman@house.mi.gov. Categories: Wakeman News 18Apr Rep. Wakeman schedules local office hourslast_img read more


Alcino Lavrador Altice Labs general manager Alci

first_imgAlcino LavradorAltice Labs’ general manager, Alcino Lavrador, discusses IP delivery, the advent of 5G and unpicks some of the biggest technical challenges facing the TV industry today.What television or broadcast projects are currently occupying most of Altice Labs’ time?At Altice we want to offer the best and most unique user experience to our television customers. For that, Altice Labs is working on an “Altice User Experience” supported over a unified platform for all access networks: FTTH, Cable, xDSL, Wi-Fi, 3G/4G. This means, among others, and not to mention the technological challenges of merging platforms, presenting content in a more thematic way, less siloed in channels. On the mobility side, our efforts are to bring more and more functionalities previously restricted to fixed-access IPTV, namely better personalisation and seamless continuity between platforms.What do you think are the biggest technological challenges facing the TV industry in 2017?Customers today want to watch TV not only on the big screen but also on the move and on more and more portable devices, even at home and simultaneously. So, WiFi delivery inside the home, supporting multiple streams with the same quality that the customers are used to, is probably the biggest challenge. To deliver 4K TV consistently over WiFi is no small feat today. 802.11ac with 4×4 and mesh extenders will help and will have a big push in 2017, but compatibility issues with existing STBs will come up. In addition we will see growth in data mining and analytics about customer behaviour – aiming at a better personalised offering and also a new revenue stream for advertising. Not least, as digital content availability is growing exponentially, new and easier ways to discover real-time and stored content must appear in order to enhance the customer experience.How useful is full duplex DOCSIS 3.1 for maximising cable bandwidth and what technology or technologies will come after that?Full duplex DOCSIS 3.1 and other such evolutions for cable can represent additional tools in our toolbox for delivering the best possible bandwidth to our customers as a very efficient value-for-money proposition. It’s possible that it will be used in some places, and in other places maybe GPON is a better solution. Or we could keep the cable plant as it is or with small improvements and just do a selective subscriber migration, putting the most eager customers on FTTH/GPON, which leaves more bandwidth for the remaining ones. We need to remember that FDX DOCSIS 3.1 comes at a price, with added complexity, without MPEG-TS Video and an all new silicon solution required. At Altice Labs we are working on NGPON2, developing our own equipment and technology, because we believe this will be the future for next-generation access networks.What challenges will arise from the greater move towards IP delivery of content?At Altice Labs we don’t see this move as a set of challenges but more as a new opportunity. In Portugal we have, for a long time, had a full IPTV solution in place and we think that IP delivery of content is a significant improvement. For instance, as a multi-national group, Altice can leverage our data networks in completely different geographies to allow us to produce content in one place, complement it in another, and deliver it to all the group operators. To do that in a non-IP network can be a nightmare, but with IP it just leverages our existing infrastructure, knowledge and investment. Most cable operators are already using IP delivery of content as the back-end for QAM muxes, for VOD or catch-up TV, so most times you just remove the QAM muxes. You need a correctly dimensioned CDN. However, you should have it in place anyway since most of the growth in consumption is in on-demand and is happening in additional devices that are already IP-only.How important do you think 5G will be to the future of TV, as viewers increasingly stream content on the move and to different devices?Although the big screen TV will continue to be a staple of our day to day life, and people still want to see the hottest content on the biggest screen, there is no doubt that personal and mobile video consumption will continue to grow. 5G will have an important role in that respect. According to research, by 2020, more than half of all mobile traffic will be video. People are watching it on small and not so small screens with increased resolutions, some with 2K and 4K screens, so video quality really matters. What also matters is latency and buffering time, all areas were 5G promises to improve the customer experience. We also expect that in the future, people will increasingly broadcast self-produced content as has been demonstrated by trends like Periscope, Facebook Live and YouTube Live. 5G will allow for this kind of experience in crowded spaces, like music festivals, where today’s technologies have a huge challenge. These are only a couple of examples. We expect new uses cases in line with the increasing digitisation of our society enabled by current 3G/4G with services like Uber and other digital platform-based services.Do you think traditional over-the-air broadcast will eventually become obsolete? If so, how long until that will happen?If you’re talking about DTT, yes I think that it will become obsolete. The main reason is that these frequencies are a prime asset for telecommunications and there will be a point in time that people will place more value on this spectrum being used for ‘mobile data’ than for broadcast TV. People will get all the TV they want as ‘mobile data’ anyway. It will take some time but it will happen.What do you think about the long-term viability of DTH satellite TV as a mass-market delivery mechanism? I don’t believe that DTH will go away anytime soon. It’s a completely different proposition than DTT, there are countries like Brazil that have a massive area with people scattered all over the place that will only be able to get broad, good quality content this way. In these countries it will still be a mass-market proposition. In other countries, like in Europe, it will be used more as a complementary solution for places that the fixed network will not reach. Even the foreseen 5G will not be suitable as an alternative to deliver 4K, 8K or whatever resolution we will have at that time. DTH will always be able to solve this.How does Altice Labs divide its efforts between its teams in Portugal, the US, France, Israel, Brazil. Do you all have different remits and responsibilities?We try to take advantage of what is being done better in each geography avoiding overlap and duplication of work. If we have a good application developed in France, the United States, or whatever geography, we’ll try to use it in all the group operations. The origin of Altice Labs dates back to 1950 with over 66 years shaping the telecommunications evolution not only in Portugal but also in all the places where our technology has been deployed. Achievements like mobile prepaid services that we pioneered in 1995 have been of worldwide benefit. Over our 66 years of history, much more could be highlighted, like one of the first commercial interactive cable TV service in 2001. More recently, in August 2015, we did a field trial of NGPON2 technology with Verizon, the first with tuneable optics offering symmetrical broadband speeds of up to 10 Gbps, with the potential to go even higher – up to 40 or even 80Gbps in the near future. An existing innovation ecosystem in Portugal, supported by strong partnerships with universities, industry and startups, and complemented with R&D collaboration projects under European Union Framework Programmes like H2020, enables a continuous flow of innovation. This is feeding the process of developing new and advanced products that are being deployed in over 40 countries in the world, not just in Altice’s geographies. We do not simply follow the technological evolutions; we are part of them!What are Altice Labs’ key aims for the year ahead?The first objective is to support Altice’s aggressive expansion providing state-of-the-art technology enabling a clear differentiation to competitors. Besides being an R&D lab, we have a solid product orientation strategy with a market positioning and growth ambition. We believe we are a key factor that can help turn Altice into the most innovative CSP in the world. We are committed to evolving our products for the most efficiency practices, incorporating the results from R&D exploratory projects in network architectures – like SDN and NFV for our product lines of network systems, OSS, convergent charging and policy platforms, and TV solutions. Of course, maintaining the creativity culture that has been in our DNA  for years, in parallel with the committed and quality delivery of solutions to the market, is the main challenge in a fast-paced industry.Alcino Lavrador will speak at Cable Congress in Brussels this week. He is due to appear on the ‘Fostering Innovation’ panel at 16:45 on March 8, 2017.last_img read more


Online and inperson care found to be equally effective at improving psoriasis

first_img Source:https://www.keckmedicine.org/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 7 2018For approximately 8 million Americans, visiting a doctor regularly is the key to managing their psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory skin condition characterized by itchy or painful red patches that can appear anywhere on the body. But for some people, seeing a specialist regularly can be a monumental challenge, especially for those who live in rural or underserved communities. A new study led by the Keck School of Medicine of USC, however, raises the possibility that one day, people with psoriasis may be able to simply go online to receive their care. Published today in JAMA Network Open, the study found that online and in-person care were equally effective at improving psoriasis symptoms.”Patients with chronic skin diseases need ongoing care, and depending on where they live, their access to dermatological care can be variable,” says the study’s lead author April Armstrong, MD, MPH, professor of dermatology (clinical scholar) and associate dean for clinical research at the Keck School. “Our study suggests that an online care delivery model is an effective way to bring high-quality care to patients regardless of where they live or what their work/life schedules look like.”Related StoriesNewly discovered bacteria-killing protein on the epidermis requires vitamin A to workAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaResearchers investigate causal relationship between higher BMI and psoriasisIn the multicenter study, Armstrong and her colleagues followed nearly 300 patients who had been randomized to either online or in-person care and monitored their symptom improvement.Patients assigned to online care logged in to a secure, web-based connected health platform where they could communicate with their primary care provider or dermatologist, share images of their skin and receive treatment recommendations. After reviewing transmitted information, health care providers evaluated patients’ progress, provided patient education and prescribed medications electronically. Patients assigned to in-person care received treatment as usual.Psoriasis severity was measured at baseline and again at three, six, nine and 12 months. Across the follow-up visits, the two groups achieved similar improvement in psoriasis severity scores.”From a patient’s perspective, there are several benefits to an online care delivery model: They don’t need to travel to a facility with specialty care, they can receive high-quality specialty care at home and they can communicate with their doctor at a time that’s convenient for them,” Armstrong says. “From a provider’s perspective, the benefits include flexibility in where and when they work.”While this study focused on patients with psoriasis, Armstrong believes that the online care model has other potential applications as well.”The use of teledermatology needs to be considered in other patient populations with chronic skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis. There is a critical need for children and adults with atopic dermatitis to receive high-quality specialist care for this condition through novel telehealth delivery methods,” she says.last_img read more


Characterizing potential therapeutic target to increase heart function after heart attack

first_img Source:University of Houston The release of catecholamines is a normal and acute occurrence if you’re needing to run a marathon or escape an attack, for instance, but in heart failure it is no longer acute, it becomes a chronic response. Every day for the rest of your life those hormones will be elevated above normal levels. Once this happens, this elevated response desensitizes receptors on the cells of the heart.”Bradley K. McConnell, Associate Professor of Pharmacology Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 23 2019A University of Houston College of Pharmacy researcher is characterizing a potential therapeutic target to increase heart function following a heart attack, helping alleviate the symptoms of heart failure.The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute awarded $459,000 to associate professor of pharmacology Bradley K. McConnell to do the work which involves the actions of adrenaline/noradrenaline. They are also known as catecholamines, the “fight-or-flight” response hormones on the heart.center_img Related StoriesSmoking triples the risk of death from cardiovascular diseaseCutting around 300 calories a day protects the heart even in svelte adultsImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsCatecholamines are released and bind to the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) located on the cells of the heart. β-AR signaling is the primary mechanism to increase the ability of the heart to contract or pump blood. However, chronic β-AR stimulation, which occurs in heart failure, results in reduced contractility due to desensitization of these receptors and thus the heart is no longer able to respond to the demands of the body.The receptors, once able to bind to the hormones, respond to the overstimulation of the continual adrenaline rush on them by desensitizing, or retracting into the cell itself. If the receptor is no longer there it cannot help respond to the heart’s demands.”I want to try to identify how to get those receptors to stay on the membrane longer so that even during heart failure we can get those receptors to increase heart function,” said McConnell. He said the key is a protein called gravin, or AKAP12, an A-kinase anchoring protein that fine-tunes cellular responses and interacts with the β-AR subtype, β2-AR, to regulate the expression of this receptor on the cells of the heart, allowing it to bind and respond to the catecholamine’s actions.”We are working to identify the role of gravin on regulating the expression of receptors on membranes,” said McConnell. “We have primitive data that without gravin we see a much larger increase of the receptor on the membrane, and the overexpression brings the opposite effect.”McConnell’s co principal investigator on this project is Preethi Gunaratne, professor of biology and biochemistry.last_img read more


Fugitive Bear Escapes Jail Cell Scales 3 Electric Fences and Is Now

first_imgThere’s a fugitive on the loose in northern Italy. He’s skilled at scaling electric fences, goes by the name of M49, weighs 300 lbs. (136 kilograms) and is very, very fluffy. That’s right — northern Italy’s most wanted fugitive is a bear. Deemed a danger to humans and wildlife, M49 was captured in the Trentino region of northern Italy on Sunday and placed in a high-security enclosure with other “so-called problem bears,” the Trentino Press Office said in a statement. But mere walls couldn’t contain M49. Within hours, the bear had scaled all three electric fences, plus a 13-foot (4.3 meters) barrier and vanished without a trace. A search team of park rangers and sniffer dogs is scouring the region for M49, whose tracking collar was removed upon his capture. Trentino Gov. Maurizio Fugatti gave the rangers permission to shoot the bear if they encounter him, explaining in a translated statement that the bear’s escape over a fence “carrying 7,000 volts shows how dangerous it is.” [8 Human-Animal Encounters That Went Horribly Wrong]Advertisement The World Wildlife Fund for Nature Italy disagreed. In a statement, representatives from the group said the fence was most likely “not working properly, since bears do not fly.” A camera trap image of DJ3, another “problem bear” from the Trentino region of Italy. Credit: Trentino Press Office A camera trap image of escaped bear M49. The fugitive bear escaped an enclosure where he was being held. Credit: Trentino Press Office Italian Twitter is following M49’s escape with baited breath, and users appear to be on the side of the fluffy fugitive. The hashtag “#fugaperlaliberta,” which means “#escapeforfreedom” in Italian, is trending on Twitter. Brown bears are native to the Italian Alps but were nearly extinct in the region by the early 20th century. In the late 1990s, conservationists brought 10 brown bears to Italy from Slovenia. That population of 10 has since grown to between 50 and 60 bears. Since the reintroduction effort, bears in the region have frequently come into contact with humans. In 2017, one bear startled an Italian village when the animal lowered itself into an alley and barreled through the town, The Telegraph reported. That same year, another bear was shot when it mauled an elderly man walking his dog. 7 Iconic Animals Humans Are Driving to Extinction Image Gallery: Beastly Bears | Photos of Bears The World’s Biggest Beasts: Here and Gone Trentino authorities could have prevented interaction between M49 and humans by setting up electric fences outside of populated areas, biologist Luigi Boitani from Rome’s La Sapienza University told Italian media, Phys.org reported. That said, the electrified enclosure was never going to contain “a large, adult and spirited male bear,” Boitani said. (His statement was translated from Italian.) Originally published on Live Science.last_img read more


Radiation risks in using medical devices grossly neglected in India

first_imgSHARE SHARE EMAIL December 15, 2018 healthcare industry COMMENTS Published on medical and surgical equipment Radiation hazards in using medical devices, such as x-ray machine, are grossly neglected in the country and most hospitals and diagnostic centres do not comply with the stipulated safety norms, according to Mohammed Amir, a researcher.He was presenting a paper at a session on regulation of medical devices on Saturday, the concluding day, at the three-day WHO Global Forum on Medical Devices at AP Medtech Zone.He said a study conducted in five states had shown that there was very little awareness in the general public as well as professionals in the field about radiation hazards. “No attempt is being made to keep the x-ray machines and other such devices in safe rooms and to train the staff handling them to take precautions to protect themselves as well as the patients. Such devices are being handled casually, exposing people to radiation risks,” he said.However, he said, of late the Government has initiated some steps to sensitise the public as well as the professionals on safety norms. In 10 states, a programme on safety norms has been launched but still a lot remains to be done.Dr V.G Somani, the Joint Drug Controller, India, spoke about the steps being taken to regulate the manufacture, import and marketing of medical devices in the country. On Jan 1, 2018, a notification had been issued under the Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940, covering 27 medical devices including BP monitoring equipment. Rules stipulated in the notification were harmonised with the Medical Devices Rules, 2017. Still, the process was going on and many more medical devices would be notified.He said the standards laid down by the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) would have to be complied with by the manufacturers, importers and others in the field. If there are no standards by the BIS, then ISO standards would have to be followed. Some of the rules would be enforced by the Centre and some by the States. AMTZ at Visakhapatnam, the first cluster of MD units in the country, would lend support to the regulatory authorities in the country, he added.Dulce Maria Martinez Pereira and Alexandra Lemgruber spoke about the regulatory regime for medical devices in America and Latin America. COMMENT SHARElast_img read more


Centre rules out possibility of extensive reforms in CBI

first_imgSHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTS CBI SHARE February 06, 2019center_img COMMENT New Delhi, February 6The government is not seriously contemplating bringing extensive reforms in the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI), Minister of State for Personnel Jitendra Singh said on Wednesday. “No,” said the minister in a written reply in Lok Sabha when a question on the same was asked. The assertion assumes significance as the central probe agency had been in news for some time due to bitter fight between its two former top officers — former CBI chief Alok Kumar Verma and the then Special Director Rakesh Asthana.Both Verma and Asthana had accused each other of corruption. PTIMeanwhile, the government had on Saturday appointed former Madhya Pradesh police chief Rishi Kumar Shukla as CBI chief. Published onlast_img read more