Mandela in film

first_imgMorgan Freeman and Matt Damon received widespread acclaim for their roles in the Clint Eastwood-directed Invictus. (Image: Invictus) British actor Idris Elba, who portrays Nelson Mandela in the latest film on the icon’s life, has reportedly worked hard on his gait, stance and accent.(Image: moviepilot) Jennifer Hudson as Winnie Madikizela-Mandela in the upcoming film directed by Darrell Roodt. The film’s release has been delayed considerably because of negative reaction and criticism.(Image: Black Thespian) MEDIA CONTACTS • Sello Hatang  CEO and spokesperson  Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory  +27 011 547 5600 RELATED ARTICLES • Nelson Mandela: a timeline • Jazz inspired by Mandela • Mandela around the world • Travelling the Mandela Route • Mandela’s head rises in HowickRomaana NaidooStanding 6ft 4ins – 1.93 metres – tall, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela is a giant of a man whose life will again be immortalised on the silver screen, this time with the focus on his earlier years through to his inauguration as the first democratically elected president of South Africa.The political activist not only united a nation divided but also put his country on the international map, and now another part of his life’s journey will be packaged in a form for all generations to appreciate. British actor Idris Elba stars in the latest film on the former president of South Africa, titled Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom.It is a videoed chronicle of Mandela’s journey, by producer Anant Singh, from his childhood in a rural village through to his inauguration, and covers the period from 1924 to 1994. Stars in the film – scheduled for release on 29 November 2013 – include Elba and Atandwe Kani as Mandela at different ages, Tony Kgoroge as Walter Sisulu and Riaad Moosa as Ahmed Kathrada. Other cast members include Zolani Mkiva (Raymond Mhlaba), Gys de Villiers (FW de Klerk), Simo Magwaza (Andrew Mlangeni), Fana Mokoena (Govan Mbeki), Thapelo Mokoena (Elias Motsoaledi), Nomfusi Gotyana (Miriam Makeba) and Naomie Harris (Winnie Madikizela-Mandela).Under director Justin Chadwick (The Other Boleyn Girl), principal photography began in KwaZulu-Natal at the end of May 2012 before moving to Cape Town, and later to Johannesburg, the Eastern Cape and then back to KwaZulu-Natal.In 1963, the South African government found Mandela, or Madiba as he is fondly called after his clan name, guilty of sabotage for his anti-apartheid activities, and he was imprisoned for 27 years, first on Robben Island and later in Pollsmoor Prison, also in Cape Town, and then Victor Verster Prison outside Paarl, from which he was released on 11 February 1990. With then-president FW de Klerk, he was jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993 for his role in ending apartheid peacefully. Finally, he became the first black president and first democratically elected leader of South Africa in 1994, showing his incredible ability to lead a nation once so divided.Elba, born in East London, in England, starred in popular television show Luther, among other productions. He joins an illustrious group of actors who have played Mandela in previous films, including Morgan Freeman, Terrence Howard, Sidney Poitier, Dennis Haysbert and Danny Glover. Winnie also honoured in filmHoward plays the former statesman in Darrell Roodt’s biopic of struggle stalwart Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, which was selected as the opening film for the eighth Montreal International Black Film Festival on 19 September 2012. The formidable Madikizela-Mandela was reportedly not consulted for the film, and in an interview published in UK newspaper The Guardian, described it as “an insult”.Winnie is based on the book Winnie Mandela: a Life by Anné Mariè du Preez Bezdrob. It stars Jennifer Hudson as Mandela’s wife and chronicles the life of the struggle heroine from her childhood through her marriage and her husband’s incarceration. It and Long Walk are expected to tussle at the box office with their release into mainstream cinema towards the end of 2013 – Winnie hits the big screen later than its originally scheduled release date because initial criticism and negative feeling towards the film caused the producers to take it back into the studio for more work.Madikizela-Mandela’s life was the subject of another film titled Mrs Mandela. It was released in 2010 as a television drama on the BBC and starred British actress Sophie Okonedo as the one-time first lady of South Africa, with David Harewood as Mandela. Local faces in this production included Rika Sennett, Vusi Kunene and François Stemmet.Then there is Winnie: The Opera, which premiered on 28 April 2011 at Pretoria’s State Theatre with Soweto-born soprano Tsakane Maswanganyi in the title role.Mandela at the moviesAnother blockbuster film portraying South Africa’s first black president is the high-profile Invictus (2009), a biographical sports drama directed by Clint Eastwood and starring Freeman and Matt Damon. The storyline is based on the John Carlin book Playing the Enemy: Nelson Mandela and the Game That Made a Nation, which centres around events in South Africa before and during the 1995 Rugby World Cup, hosted in the country after the dismantling of apartheid. South Africa won the tournament.Eastwood’s son Kyle wrote the score for the film, which earned Golden Globe, Screen Actors’ Guild and Academy Award nominations for Freeman as best actor and Damon as best supporting actor.Also released in 2009 was the film Endgame, starring William Hurt as Prof Willie Esterhuyse, Chiwetel Ejiofor as Thabo Mbeki, Clarke Peters as Mandela and John Kani as Oliver Tambo. It’s based upon the book The Fall of Apartheid by Robert Harvey and focuses on the secret talks which took place in Somerset, UK, between the then-ruling National Party and the African National Congress (ANC) at the end of the apartheid years. Mbeki was the ANC’s director of information at the time and philosophy professor Esterhuyse was a well-known apartheid critic. He received a national order for his role in the negotiations.In Goodbye Bafana, released in 2007, American actor Dennis Haysbert played Mandela and Joseph Fiennes played James Gregory, a prison guard who became his close friend during the years the two were together on Robben Island and at Pollsmoor and Victor Verster. The film was based on Gregory’s book Goodbye Bafana: Nelson Mandela, My Prisoner, My Friend, and was released in the US as The Color of Freedom.Poitier portrayed the statesman in the 1997 television release Mandela and De Klerk, with veteran Michael Caine as FW de Klerk. The film revealed the events leading up to the transition to democracy and also starred Gerry Maritz as De Klerk’s predecessor PW Botha, Ian Roberts as National Party politician and negotiator Kobie Coetsee, Ben Kruger as James Gregory and Jerry Mofokeng as Walter Sisulu. It was filmed in South Africa and, as far as possible, most of the locations were where the actual events took place. Back in 1987 the television film Mandela starred Danny Glover in the title role, supported by Alfre Woodard as Madikizela-Mandela, John Matshikiza as Sisulu and John Indo as Tambo. It was filmed in Zimbabwe and followed Mandela’s progress after his graduation as a lawyer as he evolved into a political activist.However, the repeated casting of overseas actors to play South Africans has been criticised locally. Mabutho “Kid” Sithole, former president of the Creative Workers Union of South Africa, said recently of Long Walk: “There’s always some reason to avoid using South African actors and having other people tell our stories. You tell me now, how will this actor pronounce Qunu, where Mandela was born, or Rolihlahla, his real name?”Internationally acclaimed actor and playwright John Kani is reported to have said, when asked by Freeman about how he felt to see Mandela portrayed by an American, that he understood why the producers chose a big Hollywood name but was saddened that “I wasn’t even asked”.Sello Maake Ka Ncube, a local actor, did portray Mandela in the 2011 local stage production Rivonia Trial, which opened at the State Theatre in April that year. It was written by Mpumelelo Paul Grootboom and directed by Aubrey Sekhabi.In 2014 the Rivonia Trial marks its 50-year anniversary.last_img read more


The Return of the Energy Quiz

first_imgWhen I published my first Energy Quiz over a year ago, a reader posted the comment: “I want another quiz.” Okay — we aim to please.Remember, using Google for research is cheating. Answers are at the bottom of the page.1. Evaporative coolers:a. Perform better in a dry climate than a humid climate.b. Perform better in a humid climate than a dry climate.c. Don’t work very well anywhere in the U.S.2. To insulate basement walls in Climate Zone 6 with XPS, what is the minimum thickness required by the 2006 IRC?a. One inch.b. Two inches.c. Three inches.3. When home inspectors see tongue-and-groove ceiling boards:a. They smile, because tongue-and-groove boards are a natural (and green) choice for ceilings.b. They smile, because 3/4-inch-thick boards add to a ceiling’s R-value.c. They become concerned, because such ceilings often lack an air barrier.4. The wall and roof insulation used in the hut erected in 1910 by Robert Falcon Scott at Cape Evans in Antarctica was:a. Strawb. Quilted seaweedc. Sealskin5. In a Florida home with an unconditioned attic:a. It’s helpful to bury attic ducts in a deep layer of cellulose insulation.b. Burying attic ducts in cellulose insulation can lead to moisture problems.6. The soil used in a typical “green” (vegetated) roof:a. Has a significant R-value, greatly improving the insulating value of the roof.b. Has a low R-value — less than required for a typical roof — and is more expensive to install than conventional insulation.7. The process whereby the moisture content of a porous (hygroscopic) building material increases is referred to as:a. Capillary action.b. Permeance.c. Sorption.8. Of all the windows sold in Sweden in 2002:a. 20% were triple-glazed.b. 50% were triple-glazed.c. 80% were triple-glazed.9. The 2009 IRC requires builders:a. To… This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.center_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log inlast_img read more


Navy Looks to Expand Fleet End Strength over Next Five Years

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR With plans to add more than 25,000 sailors and 46 ships over the next five years, the Navy plans to increase financial incentives to bolster retention and recruitment, and adjust advancement policies to stem attrition. The service’s end strength, which now stands at 319,400, is slated to reach 344,800 sailors by the end of fiscal 2023, under the administration’s new budget request. Navy staffing hasn’t been that large since 2006, when it finished the year with about 350,000 personnel, reports Navy Times. The service’s target end strength could surpass 350,000 if Congress finds a way to fund the Navy’s long-term goal of a 350-plus-ship fleet, Vice Adm. Robert Burke, chief of naval personnel, told lawmakers last week. … Meanwhile, lawmakers criticized the administration’s 30-year shipbuilding plan, which calls for expanding the fleet from its current level of 280 ships to 355 by sometime in the 2050s, reported Military.com. The Navy’s plan “falls well short” of what the service needs, Rep. Rob Wittman (R-Va.), chairman of the House Armed Services’ Seapower and Projection Forces Subcommittee, said last week. The Navy’s goal of reaching a 355-ship fleet within 30 years should be considered a floor, Wittman said.Navy photo by 2nd Class Sabrina Finelast_img read more


Christian Music Executive Bill Hearn Dies At 58

first_img Christian Music Executive Bill Hearn Dies At 58 Twitter Email News Remembering Bill Hearn, Christian Music Maestro christian-music-executive-bill-hearn-dies-58 Facebook Capitol Christian Music Group leader helped develop the modern Christian and gospel genresPhilip MerrillGRAMMYs Dec 12, 2017 – 1:16 pm On Dec. 10 Bill Hearn, chairman/CEO of Capitol Christian Music Group, died in Nashville, Tenn., from cancer. He was 58 years old.The son of Billy Rae Hearn, Bill Hearn got his start in the industry with Sparrow Records. During his career, he worked with Christian artists such as Kirk Franklin, Tasha Cobbs, Tye Tribbett, Amy Grant, Mandisa, Matt Redman, and TobyMac before assuming the same role his father held at Capitol Christian Music Group.Hearn’s producing efforts earned Hearn two GRAMMYs during his career, first for 1995 for his contributions to Amazing Grace — A Country Salute To Gospel for Best Southern Gospel, Country Gospel Or Bluegrass Gospel and again for 2009 for his work on the collection Oh Happy Day, which earned Best Traditional Gospel Album.In 2015 he was honored with the T.J. Martell Foundation’s Frances Preston Lifetime Music Industry Achievement Award.A great friend to the Recording Academy, Hearn served the organization as a past Trustee.”Following in the footsteps of his late father Billy Ray, Hearn played an essential role in the formation of the renowned Christian music company — Capitol Christian Music Group,” said Recording Academy President/CEO Neil Portnow. “Hearn will not only be remembered for his impressive list of achievements, but for his philanthropic efforts, kind spirit and commitment to his craft.”Hillary Scott on GRAMMYs, God, Family, ‘Love Remains’Read morelast_img read more


Sessions Pushes To Speed Up Immigration Courts Deportations

first_img Share Manuel Balce Ceneta/APAttorney General Jeff Sessions at a roundtable meeting on sanctuary cities hosted by President Trump earlier this monthThe Trump administration has been trying to ramp up deportations of immigrants in the country illegally. But one thing has been standing in its way: Immigration judges often put these cases on hold.Now Attorney General Jeff Sessions is considering overruling the judges.One practice that is particularly infuriating to Sessions and other immigration hard-liners is called administrative closure. It allows judges to put deportation proceedings on hold indefinitely.“Basically they have legalized the person who was coming to court, because they were illegally in the country,” Sessions said during a speech in December.Sessions is using his authority over the immigration court system to review a number of judicial decisions. If he overturns those decisions, thousands of other cases could be affected. In this way, he is expected to end administrative closure, or scale it back.The attorney general may also limit when judges can grant continuances and who qualifies for asylum in the United States.This could reshape the nation’s immigration courts, which are overseen by the Justice Department, and make them move faster. Sessions says he is trying to clear a massive backlog of cases that is clogging the docket.But critics say he is weighing changes that would threaten the due process rights of immigrants, and the integrity of immigration courts.“What he wants is an immigration court system which is rapid, and leads to lots of deportations,” said Nancy Morawetz, who teaches the Immigrant Rights Clinic at New York University School of Law.“It’s really just an unprecedented move by the attorney general to change the way the whole system works,” she said.It’s rare for an attorney general to exercise this power, but Sessions has done it four times in the past three months.Separately, for the first time, the Justice Department is setting quotas for immigration judges, pushing them to resolve cases quickly in order to meet performance standards.It’s not just immigration lawyers who are worried about the effect of any changes. The union that represents immigration judges is concerned, too.“A lot of what they are doing raises very serious concerns about the integrity of the system,” said Judge Ashley Tabaddor, president of the National Association of Immigration Judges, “judges are supposed to be free from these external pressures.”The attorney general insists he’s trying to make sure that judges are deciding cases “fairly and efficiently.” And says he is trying to clear a backlog of nearly 700,000 cases.That is in addition to the hundreds of thousands of cases in administrative closure. Nearly 200,000 immigration cases have been put on hold in this way in the past five years alone.“Far and away, administrative closure was being abused,” said Andrew Arthur, a former immigration judge who is now a fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies, which advocates for lower levels of immigration.He says many of those cases should have ended in deportation. “But rather than actually going through that process, the Obama administration simply administratively closed them. And took them off the docket to be forgotten,” he said.Sessions has chosen to personally review the case of an undocumented immigrant named Reynaldo Castro-Tum who didn’t show up for his removal hearing. The judge wondered whether the man ever got the notice to appear in court and put his deportation proceedings on hold.In a legal filing in January, Sessions asked whether judges have the authority to order administrative closure and under what circumstances.Immigration lawyers and judges say there are legitimate reasons to administratively close a case. For instance, some immigrants are waiting for a final decision on visa or green card applications.There is a backlog for those applications, too. They’re granted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, which is separate from immigration court. And that can take months, if not years.Immigration lawyers and judges are worried that undocumented immigrants could be deported in the meantime.“You know this is not the private sector where you pay extra money and you can get it done in two days,” said Cheryl David, an immigration lawyer in New York.David represents hundreds of undocumented immigrants who are facing deportation. She often asks judges to put the proceedings on hold.“It gives our clients some wiggle room to try and move forward on applications,” she said. “These are human beings, they’re not files.”Immigration lawyers say these changes could affect immigrants across the country.Brenda DeLeon has applied for a special visa for crime victims who are undocumented. She says her boyfriend beat her up, and she went to the police.She came to the U.S. illegally from El Salvador in 2015, fleeing gang violence, and settled in North Carolina.“If I go back, then my life is in danger,” DeLeon said through a translator. “And not only mine, but my children’s lives too.”For now, a judge has put DeLeon’s deportation case on hold while she waits for an answer on her visa application.Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more