Car sales February 2018 Check out how Maruti Suzuki Hyundai Tata Motors

first_imgWorkers assemble cars inside the Hyundai Motor India Ltd. plant at Kancheepuram district of Tamil Nadu October 4, 2012.Reuters fileThe second month of 2018 saw carmakers steadily improving the sales numbers in India. The sales number of automakers in January 2018 was hopeful after a roller-coaster year that saw the BS-IV switch, GST implementation and the addition of cess. The February numbers for most of the automakers are positive and that indicates the industry is now slowly returning to normalcy.We have compiled a list of sales data for February 2018.Maruti SuzukiIndia’s largest carmaker Maruti Suzuki sold a total of 149,824 units in February 2018 and registered 15 percent growth over the same period last year. This includes 137,900 units in the domestic market and 11,924 units of exports. The company sold a total of 130,280 units in February 2017.The Indo-Japanese outfit’s domestic sales in India reported a 13.3 percent growth with 136,648 unit sales led by premium hatchback Baleno and compact SUV Vitara Brezza. Maruti Suzuki BalenoMaruti SuzukiToyota Kirloskar MotorJapanese carmaker Toyota’s Indian subsidiary Toyota Kirloskar Motor (TKM) sold a total of 12,705 units in February 2018. TKM sold 11,864 units in the domestic market and exported 841 units of the Etios series. In February 2017, TKM sold 11,543 units in the domestic market and exported 570 units of the Etios series. The domestic sales witnessed a growth of just three percent.FordFord India’s sales (domestic and exports) in February 2018 stood at 23,965 vehicles as compared to 24,026 in the same month last year.Ford claims its domestic business grew to 9,041 vehicles in February from 8,338 vehicles in the same month last year. Exports were at 14,924 units compared to 15,688 vehicles in February 2017.Tata MotorsTata Motors’ passenger vehicle sales grew 45 percent with sales of 17,771 units in February 2018 against 12,272 units in the same month last year. New generation models like the Tiago and Tigor are the key models behind the spike along with the Nexon and Hexa gaining traction in the UV segment.Tata Motors’ overall sales grew by 38 percent at 58,993 units against 42,679 units due to the strong showing of its commercial and passenger vehicles business in the domestic market. Tata NexonTata MotorsMahindra & MahindraHomegrown automaker Mahindra & Mahindra (M&M) posted eight percent growth in its passenger vehicles sales (which includes UVs, cars, and vans). The company sold 22,389 units in February 2018 as against 20,717 units in February last year.Commercial vehicle sales last month jumped 28 percent to 20,946 units compared to 16,383 units in the same month of 2017.HyundaiHyundai Motor India Ltd. (HMIL), the country’s second-largest car manufacturer registered sold 44,505 units in the domestic market and exported 10,917 units, taking the total sales to 55,422 units for the month of February 2018. The domestic sales grew by 5.1 percent against 42,327 units in February 2017.last_img read more


Santa Fe ISD Approves New Safety Measures

first_img Share Photo: Harris County Sheriff’s Office via Twitter / @HCSOTexasLaw enforcement agencies are deployed at Santa Fe High School, located in Galveston County, because of the shooting incident that happened in the morning of May 18, 2018.Trustees of Santa Fe Independent School District approved new safety measures, last night.Media outlets report the board decided to install new locks inside classrooms, remodel the front entrance to the school with bulletproof glass, and install new alarms and panic buttons in classrooms.The Galveston County Daily News reports about 1.5 million dollars will be spent on a series of updates, many to be completed before the school year begins. The district will reportedly relocate the classrooms where the deadly shooting took place last May.The board did not vote on whether to install metal detectors donated to the district.last_img read more


CarbonNanotube Memory that Really Competes

first_imgA side-view schematic of the single-walled carbon-nanotube field-effect transistor, showing the two halfnium dioxide layers (HfO2). The nanotube is represented by the honeycomb pattern in the center of the figure. VGS is the voltage across the transistor’s gate and source. (PhysOrg.com) — Researchers in Finland have created a form of carbon-nanotube based information storage that is comparable in speed to a type of memory commonly used in memory cards and USB “jump” drives. Researchers combine logic, memory to build a ‘high-rise’ chip This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Carbon-Nanotube Memory that Really Competes (2009, January 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-01-carbon-nanotube-memory.html The group’s memory scheme has a write-erase time of 100 nanoseconds, which is about 100,000 times faster than previously reported carbon-nanotube memory, and retains this ability over more than 10,000 write-erase cycles. The work is reported in the January 16, 2009, online edition of Nano Letters.”In terms of speed and endurance, our memory structure is as good as the commercially available Flash memory technologies,” said Helsinki University of Technology physicist Päivi Törmä, the paper’s corresponding author, to PhysOrg.com.The memory scheme stores information using single-walled carbon-nanotube transistors, specifically field-effect transistors, which are among the fastest carbon-nanotube electrical components. Each transistor consists of four key parts, the gate, source, drain, and substrate.As a substrate, Törmä and her colleagues chose a silicon wafer. In collaboration with Finnish technology-equipment company Beneq Oy, they applied a 20-nanometer-thick layer of hafnium oxide using atomic layer deposition, a technique used to deposit materials in very thin layers. The hafnium oxide separates the substrate, which was also used as the gate in this case, from the rest of the structure. Choosing hafnium dioxide as the gate “dielectric” material—an insulator placed between two conductors to separate them—appears to be the key to the device’s fast operation, as it can trap and release charge very quickly and efficiently.On top of the hafnium-oxide layer, the group deposited a few drops of a carbon-nanotube solution, produced using commercially available nanotubes with diameters between 1.2 and 1.5 nanometers and lengths of 100 to 360 nanometers. Using an atomic force microscope, they identified nanotubes with the proper alignment; only those nanotubes became transistors. They then created source and drain electrodes for each nanotube using the metal palladium, with the nanotube forming the transistor’s conductive channel. Finally, the researchers deposited another 20-nanometer layer of hafnium oxide on top of the nanotube transistor, to “passivate” the surface, preventing unwanted reactions.”The fast memory operation we have demonstrated could potentially also be realized using other carbon materials, such as carbon-nanotube bundles or graphene,” said Törmä.Each transistor stores information based on whether current is running through it. When the voltage applied across the transistor reaches a certain threshold, current flows, which can represent one bit of information, either a “0” or a “1” (bit is short for binary digit). For example, when the transistor is conducting it may represent a “1,” and when not conducting, a “0.”Each transistor can store information for about 150,000 seconds, or about 42 hours. This is quite short, although Törmä and her group think they can improve it by adding an oxide layer between the gate and the nanotube.Citation: Nano Lett., Article ASAP DOI: 10.1021/nl8029916Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore furtherlast_img read more