a month agoWest Ham boss Pellegrini pleased with Rice progress

first_imgWest Ham boss Pellegrini pleased with Rice progressby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveWest Ham boss Manuel Pellegrini is pleased with the progress of Declan Rice.Rice came in for some criticism for his defensive error which contributed to Kosovo’s second goal against England in Tuesday’s European Qualifier at St Mary’s.Hammers manager Pellegrini is confident Rice has the mentality to take everything in his stride and flourish for the national side.”Declan is a very young player, he is improving in every game he plays,” said Pellegrini.”He is only 20 years old and I think with his age it is important he plays for England and it is important for him the way he can demonstrate how he works.”You can expect these mistakes for any kind of player. He is improving and for the moment he is doing well in that position.”If you are 20 years old you always want to play, but we will see if he has any muscle problem. For the moment Declan must continue playing.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more


Exercise may decrease cerebral blood flow and improve brain function in older

first_img Source:https://sph.umd.edu/news-item/exercise-may-improve-cognition-reducing-brain-blood-flow-older-adults Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 31 2019Exercise can impact biomarkers of brain function in a way that might prevent or postpone the onset of dementiaExercise training alters brain blood flow and improves cognitive performance in older adults, though not in the way you might think. A new study published by University of Maryland School of Public Health researchers in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease showed that exercise was associated with improved brain function in a group of adults diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and a decrease in the blood flow in key brain regions.”A reduction in blood flow may seem a little contrary to what you would assume happens after going on an exercise program,” explained Dr. J. Carson Smith, associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology. “But after 12-weeks of exercise, adults with MCI experienced decreases in cerebral blood flow. They simultaneously improved significantly in their scores on cognitive tests.”Dr. Smith explains that for those beginning to experience subtle memory loss, the brain is in “crisis mode” and may try to compensate for the inability to function optimally by increasing cerebral blood flow. While elevated cerebral blood flow is usually considered beneficial to brain function, there is evidence to suggest it may actually be a harbinger of further memory loss in those diagnosed with MCI. The results of the study by Dr. Smith and his team suggest exercise may have the potential to reduce this compensatory blood flow and improve cognitive efficiency in those in the very early stages of Alzheimer’s Disease.A control group of cognitively healthy older adults without mild cognitive impairment also underwent the exercise training program, consisting of four 30-minute sessions of moderate-intensity treadmill walking per week. But the program yielded different responses from each group.Related StoriesLiver fat biomarker levels linked with metabolic health benefits of exercise, study findsImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsExtremely strenuous exercise can overload the heart without increasing cardiac riskUnlike the group with MCI, whose exercise training decreased cerebral blood flow, the exercise training increased cerebral blood flow in the frontal cortex in the healthy group after 12 weeks. Their performance on the cognitive tests also significantly improved, as was observed the MCI group.For this study, changes in cerebral blood flow were measured in specific brain regions that are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, including the insula (involved in perception, motor control, self-awareness, cognitive functioning), the anterior cingulate cortex (involved in decision making , anticipation, impulse control and emotion) and the inferior frontal gyrus (involved in language processing and speech).Specifically, among those with MCI, the decreased cerebral blood flow in the left insula and in the left anterior cingulate cortex were strongly correlated with improved performance on a word association test used to measure memory and cognitive health.A previous publication from this study led by Dr. Smith focused on how the exercise intervention influenced changes in the brain’s neural networks known to be associated with memory loss and amyloid accumulation, which are both signs of MCI and Alzheimer’s.”Our findings provide evidence that exercise can improve brain function in people who already have cognitive decline,” Dr. Smith said optimistically. “We have an interest in targeting people who are at increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s earlier in the disease process. We are seeing that exercise can impact biomarkers of brain function in a way that might protect people by preventing or postponing the onset of dementia.”last_img read more


Characterizing potential therapeutic target to increase heart function after heart attack

first_img Source:University of Houston The release of catecholamines is a normal and acute occurrence if you’re needing to run a marathon or escape an attack, for instance, but in heart failure it is no longer acute, it becomes a chronic response. Every day for the rest of your life those hormones will be elevated above normal levels. Once this happens, this elevated response desensitizes receptors on the cells of the heart.”Bradley K. McConnell, Associate Professor of Pharmacology Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 23 2019A University of Houston College of Pharmacy researcher is characterizing a potential therapeutic target to increase heart function following a heart attack, helping alleviate the symptoms of heart failure.The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute awarded $459,000 to associate professor of pharmacology Bradley K. McConnell to do the work which involves the actions of adrenaline/noradrenaline. They are also known as catecholamines, the “fight-or-flight” response hormones on the heart.center_img Related StoriesSmoking triples the risk of death from cardiovascular diseaseCutting around 300 calories a day protects the heart even in svelte adultsImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsCatecholamines are released and bind to the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) located on the cells of the heart. β-AR signaling is the primary mechanism to increase the ability of the heart to contract or pump blood. However, chronic β-AR stimulation, which occurs in heart failure, results in reduced contractility due to desensitization of these receptors and thus the heart is no longer able to respond to the demands of the body.The receptors, once able to bind to the hormones, respond to the overstimulation of the continual adrenaline rush on them by desensitizing, or retracting into the cell itself. If the receptor is no longer there it cannot help respond to the heart’s demands.”I want to try to identify how to get those receptors to stay on the membrane longer so that even during heart failure we can get those receptors to increase heart function,” said McConnell. He said the key is a protein called gravin, or AKAP12, an A-kinase anchoring protein that fine-tunes cellular responses and interacts with the β-AR subtype, β2-AR, to regulate the expression of this receptor on the cells of the heart, allowing it to bind and respond to the catecholamine’s actions.”We are working to identify the role of gravin on regulating the expression of receptors on membranes,” said McConnell. “We have primitive data that without gravin we see a much larger increase of the receptor on the membrane, and the overexpression brings the opposite effect.”McConnell’s co principal investigator on this project is Preethi Gunaratne, professor of biology and biochemistry.last_img read more


New discovery could improve therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

first_imgPatients typically live to 20 or 30 years of age. There have been important improvements in respiratory care, which used to be what a majority of patients would succumb to. Now, in their 20s and 30s, they’re often succumbing to cardiomyopathy. The heart is functioning with a major component of the cell membrane missing. Over time, it wears out.”Lead author Michelle Parvatiyar, an assistant professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences in FSU’s College of Human Sciences The study was part of continued efforts by UCLA biologist Rachelle H. Crosbie, the study’s corresponding author, who previously identified sarcospan as a protein that could improve mechanical support in skeletal cell membranes lacking dystrophin. Her finding buoyed DMD researchers and affirmed sarcospan’s potential as an effective tool in the fight against the condition.”But nobody had really looked at how increasing the levels of this protein might affect the heart,” Parvatiyar said.Using a unique mouse model with a dearth of dystrophin, Parvatiyar and her collaborators did just that.In their study, the team found that while it’s is not a like-for-like replacement for dystrophin, an overexpression of sarcospan in cardiac cells seems to do the job of stabilizing cell membranes. Even under stress, researchers found, sarcospan overexpression was able to improve the membrane defect in dystrophin-deficient cells.”Sarcospan doesn’t quite do the job of dystrophin, but it acts as a glue to stabilize the membrane and hold protein complexes together when dystrophin is lacking,” said Parvatiyar, explaining a concept developed by Crosbie.Related StoriesWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenNew network for children and youth with special health care needs seeks to improve systems of careResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeCardiac measurements confirmed that sarcospan does protect the cell membrane even when the heart is placed under stress. Study co-author and FSU College of Medicine Associate Professor Jose Pinto performed the measurements, along with FSU graduate student Karissa Dieseldorff Jones and University of Miami Miller School of Medicine research assistant Rosemeire Takeuchi Kanashiro.In addition to serving as a kind of stabilizing glue, researchers said sarcospan could also act as a scaffold that supports other essential proteins at the cell membrane. That function could allow sarcospan to carry mini versions of dystrophin -; which, in its normal state, has a long and unwieldy genetic code -; to the edges of cardiac cells, where they could buttress the fragile membranes.”The idea is that you could administer the sarcospan and the dystrophin at the same time, and the sarcospan could facilitate mini dystrophin localizing to the cell membrane and help hold those complexes in place,” Parvatiyar said.Sarcospan’s two possible functions could augment existing DMD treatments, Parvatiyar said, or they could give rise to novel therapies that fortify weakened cardiac cell membranes and improve the quality of life for people with DMD.In her previous position at UCLA, Parvatiyar had frequent interactions with DMD patients and their families. She said these interactions, and the unshakeable hope she’s witnessed in those suffering from DMD, continue to drive her and her colleagues in the search for new ways to combat this debilitating condition.”Those were the first times in my life I’d ever had someone come up to me and thank me for my work,” she said. “Sometimes you can feel removed from it in the laboratory day after day. You see incremental progress. But to see people who are really yearning for help is motivating. Their positivity is incredibly inspiring.”Source:Florida State UniversityJournal reference:Parvatiyar, M.S. et al. (2019) Stabilization of the cardiac sarcolemma by sarcospan rescues DMD-associated cardiomyopathy. JCI Insight. doi.org/10.1172/jci.insight.123855. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 16 2019A new multi-institution study spearheaded by researchers at Florida State University and the University of California, Los Angeles suggests a tiny protein could play a major role in combating heart failure related to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common lethal genetic disorder among children.In collaboration with scientists from across the nation, FSU researchers found that increased levels of the protein sarcospan improve cardiac function by reinforcing cardiac cell membranes, which become feeble in patients with DMD.Their findings were published in the journal JCI Insight.The condition, which typically afflicts young boys, is caused by a mutation that prevents the body from producing dystrophin, a protein crucial to the health of skeletal, respiratory and cardiac muscles. Advances in treatment for certain types of DMD-related muscle degradation have helped to prolong patients’ lifespans. However, as DMD patients age, their heart function declines dramatically.last_img read more


Smart voice assistant answers your questions

first_img Interactive control to guide industrial robots The Hannover Messe showcase is a collaboration between the Fraunhofer Cluster of Excellence Cognitive Internet Technologies (www.cit.fraunhofer.de), Volkswagen and the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS. “Knowledge related to Berlin has been collated into a knowledge graph, where each building represents a point on the graph and forms connections with other points. As a result, we can gather progressively more information and constantly expand the knowledge base. This is what allows answering complex questions instead of restricting inquiries to a limited number of prescribed questions,” explains Lehmann. In a manufacturing context, this sort of knowledge graph could report on the status of machines, for example, or answer questions about components produced in the last hour. The knowledge graphs used for the trade show exhibition draw on a variety of data sources including Dbpedia (http://dbedia.org) and OpenStreetMap. A special feature of the voice assistant is that it is also able to harness unstructured knowledge, such as text documents on museums, for instance.With these systems, you have not only the physical machine in the production hall, but also a virtual counterpart that is fed with real data. This data can be interrogated using dialog or question answering systems. “While question answering systems directly answer a single question, dialogue systems support multiple interaction steps with sequences of questions and answers. A dialog system will also respond to sequences of inquiries and small talk, just like the exhibit we will have on display,” says Lehmann.The more training data, the smarter the voice assistant”It is the domain-specific knowledge that makes a voice assistant smart. The technical challenge from our side lies in developing a system that can understand users’ queries and respond appropriately using the knowledge contained in the knowledge graph,” the researcher concludes. Developing such a system calls for the application of the latest techniques in machine learning, techniques that the researchers at Fraunhofer IAIS are constantly developing and refining. The expertise they have assembled in machine learning and domain-specific knowledge puts them at the top of their field internationally. Tailored to the respective domains, the experts select the appropriate machine learning algorithms and train them using sample dialogs and question-answer pairs. The intelligence of the voice assistant grows with the amount of training data it amasses. The voice assistants developed by Fraunhofer IAIS offer their users the ultimate digital experience and are all GDPR-compliant. Visitors can try out the exhibition demonstrator live at the Hannover Messe from April 1 to 5 at the Fraunhofer Booth C22 in Hall 2. Voice assistants are becoming more and more prevalent in every area of our lives. At this year’s Hannover Messe, researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Intelligent Analysis and Information Systems IAIS are teaming up with au-tomaker Volkswagen to showcase a new voice interaction system that caters to domain-specific knowledge. Drawing on the techniques of “informed” machine learning, the system goes far beyond the capabilities of most Alexa, Siri & co. skills – and has been specifically designed for use in industry. The smart vehicle voice assistant is an example of how companies can use dialog systems to enable users to interact intuitively with technology and to develop new busi-ness models. The system will be on display – in a VW Tiguan – from April 1 to 5 at the Fraunhofer Booth C22 in Hall 2. Explore further Provided by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft Many people use Alexa, Siri and other similar voice assistants on a daily basis, dipping in to access the latest news, make use of voice navigation or simply stream their favorite songs. Voice assistants are an intuitive way to interact with technology, an effective way of delivering services and imparting information. They are not just handy everyday helpers, however; they present companies and business with a huge opportunity to simplify human-machine interaction and offer entirely new services to their industry customers.Focus on companiesResearchers at Fraunhofer IAIS in Sankt Augustin develop just these sorts of voice interaction systems for use in a wide variety of applications, including manufacturing and the automotive and medical sectors. While Alexa, Siri and the like are aimed at individual consumers, the research team at Fraunhofer IAIS uses the latest techniques in machine learning, question answering and knowledge graphs to address the specific needs and challenges of business. “In manufacturing, for instance, we are seeing more and more robots equipped with voice assistants, which the worker can then operate and train using voice and gestures,” says Prof. Dr. Jens Lehmann, Lead Scientist at Fraunhofer IAIS.Prof. Lehmann and his team at Fraunhofer IAIS specialize in dialog systems catering to domain-specific knowledge and trained for specific applications. At the Hannover Messe, they will be showcasing a voice assistant integrated into a VW Tiguan. Wearing a headset and virtual reality glasses, drivers will be taken on a virtual tour of Berlin while the interactive system answers questions about the surroundings such as: What’s that building on the left-hand side? What’s it known for? When was it built? Who built it? The system also supports supplementary questions such as “Where does the architect come from?” or “Tell me more about him!”Domain-specific knowledge answering complex questions Fraunhofer IAIS’s new dialog system can answer complex questions – including queries from drivers about their surroundings. The voice assistant can be used in a wide variety of applications, including manufacturing and the medical sector. Credit: iStock Citation: Smart voice assistant answers your questions (2019, March 1) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-smart-voice.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


Fugitive Bear Escapes Jail Cell Scales 3 Electric Fences and Is Now

first_imgThere’s a fugitive on the loose in northern Italy. He’s skilled at scaling electric fences, goes by the name of M49, weighs 300 lbs. (136 kilograms) and is very, very fluffy. That’s right — northern Italy’s most wanted fugitive is a bear. Deemed a danger to humans and wildlife, M49 was captured in the Trentino region of northern Italy on Sunday and placed in a high-security enclosure with other “so-called problem bears,” the Trentino Press Office said in a statement. But mere walls couldn’t contain M49. Within hours, the bear had scaled all three electric fences, plus a 13-foot (4.3 meters) barrier and vanished without a trace. A search team of park rangers and sniffer dogs is scouring the region for M49, whose tracking collar was removed upon his capture. Trentino Gov. Maurizio Fugatti gave the rangers permission to shoot the bear if they encounter him, explaining in a translated statement that the bear’s escape over a fence “carrying 7,000 volts shows how dangerous it is.” [8 Human-Animal Encounters That Went Horribly Wrong]Advertisement The World Wildlife Fund for Nature Italy disagreed. In a statement, representatives from the group said the fence was most likely “not working properly, since bears do not fly.” A camera trap image of DJ3, another “problem bear” from the Trentino region of Italy. Credit: Trentino Press Office A camera trap image of escaped bear M49. The fugitive bear escaped an enclosure where he was being held. Credit: Trentino Press Office Italian Twitter is following M49’s escape with baited breath, and users appear to be on the side of the fluffy fugitive. The hashtag “#fugaperlaliberta,” which means “#escapeforfreedom” in Italian, is trending on Twitter. Brown bears are native to the Italian Alps but were nearly extinct in the region by the early 20th century. In the late 1990s, conservationists brought 10 brown bears to Italy from Slovenia. That population of 10 has since grown to between 50 and 60 bears. Since the reintroduction effort, bears in the region have frequently come into contact with humans. In 2017, one bear startled an Italian village when the animal lowered itself into an alley and barreled through the town, The Telegraph reported. That same year, another bear was shot when it mauled an elderly man walking his dog. 7 Iconic Animals Humans Are Driving to Extinction Image Gallery: Beastly Bears | Photos of Bears The World’s Biggest Beasts: Here and Gone Trentino authorities could have prevented interaction between M49 and humans by setting up electric fences outside of populated areas, biologist Luigi Boitani from Rome’s La Sapienza University told Italian media, Phys.org reported. That said, the electrified enclosure was never going to contain “a large, adult and spirited male bear,” Boitani said. (His statement was translated from Italian.) Originally published on Live Science.last_img read more


20 Years of Kargil A ground report from Tololing in Drass

first_imgOther Videos from India 01:59 Sat, 13 Jul, 2019 First prototype of Brahmos-NG will be ready by 2024 00:41 Sat, 13 Jul, 2019 Watch: Car performs stunt at Delhi’s Vijay Chowk 03:16 Sat, 13 Jul, 2019 Pakistan removes 5 Pro-Khalistani leaders from Kartarpur corridor panel 02:13 Sat, 13 Jul, 2019 Enter the Growler: S-400 missile ground report from Moscow 01:52 Sat, 13 Jul, 2019 UP law panel drafts stringent law for mob lynching, recommends life term 03:31 Fri, 12 Jul, 2019 Delhi: Farmers of Khera Khurd shift their tubewells due to depleting water levels 09:13 Fri, 12 Jul, 2019 BJP is using money power: Abhishek Manu Singhvi on Karnataka crisis 02:41 Fri, 12 Jul, 2019 Nataka in Karnataka: Rahul Gandhi breaks his silence, says BJP using money power to topple govts Load More Other Video CategoriesIndiaSportsWorldMoviesSo SorryTelevisionlast_img read more