Foreign companies continue to disregard labour laws – GTUC

first_imgThe Guyana Trade Union Congress (GTUC) is calling on the Government to ensure that foreign companies adhere to labour laws and agreements when dealing with the rights of workers.The GTUC made this call after the Bauxite Company of Guyana Incorporated (BCGI) refused to pay workers monies deducted from their overtime payments, even thoughGTUC General Secretary, Lincoln Lewisin October of 2016 a decision was made to cease taxing overtime and all premium hours worked.“The fact that Minister Keith Scott wrote management earlier this month advising mechanisms be put in place to return taxes deducted on overtime and all premium hours worked with effect from 1st October 2016 and management continues to ignore this directive sends a strong signal that BCGI is above Government and the laws of our land,” the GTUC said in a statement.GTUC is calling on Government to honour the Constitution that establishes sovereignty over the nation and its workers and hold BCGI accountable for its deviant industrial relations practices that continue to infringe the laws of the land.“There is something troubling with Guyana’s relationship with BCGI that is allowing successive governments to allow the transgressing of the rights of Guyanese labour and the violating of our laws,” it added.The workers’ representative body said the company refuses to meet with officials, and workers are promising industrial action if they are not paid their monies.last_img read more


2 get prison in slaying

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card Sentencing for co-defendant Jose Medina, 25, who was accused of being the gunman, was postponed until Thursday because his attorney was at another trial. Barba’s mother, grandmother and sister attended the sentencing but did not make a statement, Osorio said. A fourth defendant, Jason Falcon, 26, was acquitted. Marron, Medina, and Vallejo were each also convicted of attempted murder in connection with a female passenger in Barba’s car, and jurors also found true gang and gun allegations against the three defendants. The victim and the three convicted defendants were gang members, but there was no evidence that Falcon was a gang member, prosecutors said. Two men have been sentenced to 50 years to life in prison in the gang-related slaying of a teenager who was gunned down in Lake Los Angeles as he drove away from a friend’s house. Eighteen-year-old Ernesto Barba was shot and killed in January 2004 after a fight with a group of men who had been standing outside a house where he went to retrieve a music CD. George Marron and Raymond Vallejo, both 24, were each convicted in November of first-degree murder by a Los Angeles Superior Court jury. “Because they chose to involve themselves in a gang fight resulting in the shooting death of the victim, both defendants will not be eligible for their first parole hearing until they are about 72 years old,” Deputy District Attorney Benny Osorio said after Friday’s sentencing. Barba had gone to a friend’s house in the 40500 block of 174th Street East early Jan. 3 to pick up the CD when he was confronted by the defendants, who challenged him by asking, “Where are you from?” prosecutors said. He responded with a gang name, the defendants replied with their gang affiliation, and a fight ensued, prosecutors said. Barba got into his car and drove off while Medina ran into the middle of the street and fired 13 shots. Barba’s car was found crashed two blocks away, and the victim had been shot in the back of the head, prosecutors said. Falcon held back one of the witnesses for several seconds while he was trying to help Barba, prosecutors said. Barba was a student at Desert Sands Continuation High School but had been preparing to start a new job in the next week. Medina was arrested in February 2004 in Texas after investigators learned he might have left California and alerted other police agencies around the country. The others were arrested in Lake Los Angeles in the two months after the killing. Karen Maeshiro, (661) 267-5744 karen.maeshiro@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more


Fly, the beloved flag

first_imgIt’s a potent symbol of unity and progress. It’s the only six-coloured national flag in the world. It’s also one of the youngest, yet whatever shape it takes – and it’s taken more than any other national symbol – it’s instantly recognisable to South Africans everywhere.South Africa’s flag is the only six-coloured national flag in the world. (Image: Priya Pitamber)Brand South Africa reporterThe new South African national flag first flew on 10 May 1994 – the day Nelson Mandela became president, two weeks after the country’s first democratic elections of 27 April 1994 – “not as a symbol of a political party, nor of a government, but as a possession of the people – the one thing that is literally and figuratively above all else, our flag”.The quote comes from the introduction to Flying with Pride: The Story of the South African Flag, a coffee table book derived from the incredible variety of ways in which this unique cloth has become woven into the fabric of South African society.As in the case of the rocket logo used for IT billionaire Mark Shuttleworth’s First African in Space project, the South African flag has become integrated into butterflies, bow ties, company logos, trees, top hats, hot air balloons, umbrellas, underwear … the list goes on. The South African flag has no equal in this respect.Yet the flag was originally commissioned as an interim flag only – and was a last-minute job, barely making it onto the country’s flagpoles in time to herald the new South Africa.See the South African Flag Guide for info on displaying the flag correctly – and on how to draw and colour your own flag.How the flag came to beChoosing a new flag was part of the negotiation process set in motion when Nelson Mandela was released from prison in 1990. When a nationwide public competition was held in 1993, the National Symbols Commission received more than 7 000 designs. Six designs were drawn up and presented to the public and the Negotiating Council – but none elicited enthusiastic support.A number of design studios were contracted to submit further proposals – again without success – and Parliament went into recess at the end of 1993 without a suitable candidate for the new national flag.In February 1994, Cyril Ramaphosa and Roelf Meyer, chief negotiators of the African National Congress and the National Party government of the day respectively, were tasked with resolving the flag issue. A final design was adopted on 15 March 1994 – derived from a design developed by South Africa’s former State Herald, Fred Brownell.The proclamation of the new national flag was only published on 20 April 1994 – seven days before the flag was to be inaugurated on the 27th, sparking a frantic last-minute flurry for flag manufacturers.Writing in the foreword to Flying with Pride, Ramaphosa comments: “It was difficult to imagine, back then in the days of negotiations, that this assortment of shapes and colours we had before us would become such a central part of defining and identifying a new nation.“As South Africans daily work to build a better society, they are surrounded in many forms and countless manifestations by a flag which recognises and celebrates the unity and diversity of the country’s people.“Few would have imagined, almost a decade ago, that this collection of colourful shapes could become such a potent symbol of unity and progress. But then fewer still would have thought that a country torn apart by decades of racial oppression could transform itself into a beacon of democracy and hope.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more


Scent of a woman

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest I invited my wife to join me in my ground blind for an evening of deer hunting recently. Because we would be hunting on the ground and at nose level to the deer, instead of from an elevated position such as a tree stand where scent control isn’t as critical, I advised her that clothing washed in scent-free soap was required, as was a shower using non-scented soap and shampoo prior to hitting the deer woods. She complied, but when we arrived in the blind Maria proceeded to unload a stash of stuff she had lugged along unseen by me that included a cell phone, a hard cover book, and a bottle of water straight from the refrigerator — all of which she produced from a tote bag she received as a premium for purchasing a load of fragrant hair care products. Needless to say, the four deer that approached appeared to hit a glass wall when they got downwind of us, where the does stopped suddenly, stared in our direction, snorted, turned tail and ran from our multi-scented hide.“Well that didn’t work,” she said afterward, adding: “That scent-free shampoo didn’t have my much conditioner in it anyway. My hair feels like straw.”If only it had smelled that way.Deer gun seasons openOhio’s 13th annual white-tailed deer hunting season for youths gives young hunters the opportunity to pursue the state’s most popular big-game animal statewide, on Nov. 21-22, and the regular statewide deer gun season gets underway Monday, Nov. 30 through Dec. 6. The youth deer-gun season is open to hunters with a valid youth hunting license and a deer permit. Youth hunters must be 17-years-old or younger at the time they purchase their youth hunting license.During each, deer can be hunted with a shotgun using slugs, a muzzleloader .38 caliber or larger, a handgun .357 caliber or larger, specific straight-walled cartridge rifles and bows during the two days. Go to wildohio.gov for a complete list of legal straight-walled cartridge rifles.All participants must wear hunter orange, possess a valid Ohio hunting license as well as a deer permit. Youths must be accompanied in the field by a non-hunting adult. One adult may accompany no more than two youth hunters. Deer can be hunted from 30 minutes before sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset for all seasons.Youth hunters can commemorate their achievement with a First Harvest certificate, available at wildohio.gov. Parents can upload a photo and type in the hunter’s information to personalize thecertificate. Hunters can also share photos by clicking on the Photo Gallery tab online.Deer bag limits are determined by county. Hunters may harvest only one buck in Ohio, regardless of method of take or location. Antlerless permit use has changed for the deer hunting seasons, and these permits are no longer valid in some counties.Hunters are required to make their own game tag to attach to a deer. Game tags can be made of any material (cardboard, plastic, paper, etc.) as long as it contains the hunter’s name, date, timeand county of the kill. Go to the Deer Hunting Resources page at wildohio.gov for more information about the game check process.All other regularly scheduled hunting seasons will continue during the two-day youth deer season. Most other hunting seasons are suspended during the regular statewide deer gun season. All hunters (except waterfowl hunters) are required to wear hunter orange during this time. More information can be found in the 2015-2016 Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulations and at wildohio.gov.last_img read more


Resource Discovery: Video on Coping with Loss and Helplessness

first_imgBy Kacy Mixon, PhD, LMFTSeeing and hearing about loss can adversely affect those in helping professions. Recognizing the affects and seeking treatment can be difficult, but as Lt. Col. Mary Carlisle, USAF shares, it can make a big difference in maintaining personal wellness. Watch this video from the Real Warriors Campaign YouTube channel detailing her story of developing PTSD after being deployed as a critical care nurse in Balad, Iraq and her journey towards recovery. Visit previous posts to learn more about wellness strategies for military professionals and warning signs of PTSD.Video hyperlinkThis post was written by Kacy Mixon, PhD., LMFT, Social Media Specialist, a member of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more