The Spectacular State: Culture and National Identity in Uzbekistan

first_imgLaura L. Adams, a lecturer on sociology and co-director of the Program on Central Asia and the Caucasus, delivers an insightful look into nation building in Central Asia during the post-Soviet era.last_img


University abandons plans to establish joint college in China

first_imgThe University is no longer pursuing plans to establish a joint college with Zhejiang University (ZJU) in China, according to a letter addressed to faculty from J. Nicholas Entrikin, vice president and associate provost for internationalization, sent Monday morning.Eric Richelsen Although Notre Dame will continue to foster a relationship with ZJU through exchange programs and research projects, the two universities decided not to embark on the joint venture due to challenges that arose during the deliberation process, Entrikin said in the letter.“After many hopeful and positive conversations on both curricular and administrative matters related to the joint college, we were more easily able to discriminate and to delineate some of the key challenges as well as advantages in bringing together two very different approaches to higher education,” Entrikin said. “Thorough effort was expended in addressing these complexities, and at times the conversations showed exhilarating signs of progress.“In the end, however, some areas remained challenging for both universities, and we decided that broader cooperation would be a more effective means for achieving our common interests.”Entrikin and Jonathan Noble, acting executive director for the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies, wrote a white paper addressed to Notre Dame faculty members in October 2014 explaining the possible collaboration between the two schools.The white paper said the joint liberal arts college aimed to “advance Notre Dame’s global academic reputation; promote worldwide Notre Dame’s unique and successful blend of teaching, research and service and offer opportunities for Notre Dame faculty and students to gain valuable experience teaching and studying in China.”According to the original white paper proposal, the Notre Dame-ZJU joint liberal arts college would have opened the 2017-2018 academic year. The student body would have been composed of 70 percent Chinese students and 30 percent international students. The college’s faculty would have been composed of members from both universities, and graduating students would have received a joint degree from both Notre Dame and ZJU.Over the past two years, faculty advisory delegations from both universities have made multiple campus visits — to both South Bend and Haining — to examine the project, Entrikin said. The committee reached its final conclusion after the most recent visit to China, made by a delegation that included Entrikin, University President Fr. John Jenkins, Vice President for Mission Engagement and Church Affairs Fr. William Lies and several members of the Board of Trustees.Entrikin said both universities have “gained a more comprehensive mutual understanding” and have agreed to continue discussions about future forms of collaboration. This summer, the University will host eight ZJU rising seniors participating in Notre Dame International’s iSURE program, which allows international students to participate in engineering and science research on campus.Ultimately, Entrikin said the experience has helped the University plan and develop current and new international programs, especially those in China.“Our Zhejiang colleagues now better understand what it means to be an excellent Catholic university, and we now better understand the academic achievements and aspirations of one of China’s leading universities,” he said. “On the foundation of this newly acquired shared understanding, we may now begin to proceed rapidly in building substantial and innovative partnership programs that will benefit both of our academic communities.”Tags: China, joint college, Zhejiang partnership, zhejiang University, ZJUlast_img read more


Colombia Moves Forward with Information and Instant Response Mechanisms

first_imgBy Marian Romero / Diálogo June 09, 2017 Testing, please do not approve. The Armed Forces of Colombia launched in January the National Instant Response System for Stabilization Progress (SIRIE, per its Spanish acronym) as an instability monitoring tool for the country. The system is operating nationwide with the purpose of monitoring, verifying, and analyzing factors of instability in regional security in order to adopt appropriate measures that will help improve the quality of life of the citizens. “SIRIE was planned as a tool for building communication bridges with the civilian population, community leaders, indigenous reservations, and other organizations. They can provide valuable information on alleged factors of instability,” said Major General Juan Pablo Amaya, inspector general of the Armed Forces of Colombia. Colombia is going through a period of significant transformation. The end of the armed conflict and the implementation of the accords established in Havana have created rapid changes that are new for everyone in the country. “The speed of these transformations demands efficient adaptations, from an institutional point of view, in order to face persistent threats and emerging threats, and to ensure that the agreements between the national government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia [FARC, per its Spanish acronym] are fully implemented,” said Maj. Gen. Amaya. “With SIRIE, we are looking to have a more complete overview and to restore trust with the population through efficient solutions.” Command center The system has a national call center that can be used by any citizen to report any irregular event that threatens his or her peace or safety. It relies on 13 verification teams for nationwide coverage. Each problem is handled by the general command, which strategically checks the call. It coordinates inspections of the Army, Navy, Air Force, National Police, and Attorney General’s Office. Additionally, the Strategic Command for Transition is charged with securing the Provisional Demobilization Zones (ZVTN, per its Spanish acronym). All of these government entities have a very valuable pool of information. Each one provides solutions to problems within its specialty. “When a call is received, the information is corroborated with government institutions and citizens who can provide details pertinent to the case. When possible, there is a military deployment to the scene of the crime to confirm the situation and to obtain a complete overview,” Colonel Daniel Ricardo Morales, deputy inspector of the General Command of the 7th Army Division, told Diálogo. “Later, an analysis is done at central command and the most efficient strategy is chosen to resolve the problem. From the time the call is received until a solution is found, there is a maximum period of 24 hours,” he added. The SIRIE information network is quite broad. It receives data from the Organization of American States’ Mission to Support the Peace Process in Colombia, the United Nations, non-governmental organizations, government institutions, and the community at large. All of these elements make SIRIE invulnerable to possible disinformation. Immediate response in Chocó The Pacific department of Chocó has Panama at its northern border, where the so-called Darién Gap — a jungle area that acts as a natural barrier — is located. On its eastern border is the western Andes mountain range. Throughout its history, these geographical conditions have made Chocó a propitious area for armed organized groups to operate in. In March, there were deployments in the municipality of Alto Baudó, in Chocó, due to fighting between the National Liberation Army (ELN, per its Spanish acronym) and the Gaitanista Self-Defense Forces of Colombia. Because of the fighting, 500 people moved to the municipal seat of government. To get a more complete view of the problem, Gen. Amaya visited Chocó with a special team and independently met with military, police, and civil authorities. “From all of these conversations, we obtained a truly comprehensive view of the situation. Thus it was possible to formulate a rapid analysis tailored to the circumstances. Of course, it wasn’t an in-depth investigation but rather rapid responses to a crisis moment,” Gen. Amaya said. “In this case, an order was given to increase the operation, to move the Pacific Naval Force’s river units to the river, to control the drug-trafficking routes through military operations, to secure the population, and to move up by one day our development aid for the population. All of that on the same day,” Col. Morales said. The rapid response of the military forces and the strengthening of the military presence made possible the liberation of eight people kidnapped by ELN, the return of people to their homes, and the re-establishment of security in the area. Gen. Amaya stated that the case of Alto Baudó is emblematic because it is a region where trust in the military has been historically low because of the influence of armed organized groups. “Getting to this region involves a change; it means breaking the old paradigms in a population that is warned against the legitimate forces of the state. But when they see that there are quick solutions, they start to trust in lawful channels again. SIRIE is the beginning of that return of trust,” Gen. Amaya concluded.last_img read more


Use this strategy to transform your leadership

first_imgAs leaders, we’re always searching for the magic combination of skills to motivate our teams, run our organizations efficiently, meet member/customer demands, and stay viable in competitive markets. In our pursuit of all of this, there is one strategy that underscores it all.Listening.Especially in times of crisis like we’re in now, listening is critical for leaders. There is a lot of uncertainty and we don’t have all the answers. But, listening to your executive team, stakeholders, employees, and members/customers can help inform decisions. It also strengthens relationships by building trust and loyalty.In a recent post, leadership expert Art Petty touts “fierce listening” as a skill leaders need to develop now. He highlights research and an informal poll that reinforce how this skill can make individuals feel valued and heard.Here are his tips to develop your fierce listening skills: continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


Breeze in for gorgeous bayside lifestyle

first_imgThe backyard and gardens are low maintenance.The downstairs living area opens through sliding doors to the back deck, which looks out over the fully-fenced, low-maintenance back yard and gardens. The double lockup garage has a built-in workshop area and the property comes with a water tank and solar panels, which provide a rebate each quarter. Mr Davidson said: “All the neighbours get on. They all talk to each other and look out for each other.”The property is being marketed by Margaret Vote and Chris Vote of Raine & Horne Wynnum Manly for offers over $799,000. The home at 18 Cobar St, Lota.ENJOY sea breezes and ocean glimpses from this two-storey bayside home. The property at 18 Cobar St, Lota, has four bedrooms and multiple indoor and outdoor living spaces. Owner Michael Davidson bought the home eight years ago when it was just 12 months old. “I liked the layout of the home and how big the master bedroom was with a full walk-through wardrobe,” he said. “Though I’d have to say my favourite part of the home is the north-facing front deck.“We always eat out on the front deck and we’ve got lovely breezes and slight water views.” The home is set up with the master bedroom and main living areas on the top floor. More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020The dining and living area at 18 Cobar St, Lota.Internal stairs lead to the open-plan living, dining and kitchen area, which flows out through bi-fold doors to the front deck. The modern kitchen has stainless steel appliances, slide-out pantry, a breakfast bar and white cabinetry, while timber floors feature throughout the upstairs living space. The master bedroom has a walk-through wardrobe with his and hers doors, and an ensuite with bath, shower, dual basins and a separate toilet. Downstairs there are three more bedrooms with built-in wardrobes, a laundry with extra storage, a toilet and a second bathroom with separate bath and shower. last_img read more