U.S. Builds 3rd Ebola Treatment Center in Bassa

first_imgIn support of the fight against the deadly Ebola virus in Liberia, the United States Government, through the U. S. Army Engineers, has completed its third Ebola Treatment Unit in Buchanan, Grand Bassa County.Speaking at the tour of the new facility last Friday, Major General Gary Volesky, commander of the 101st Airborne Division, explained that, this is the first Ebola treatment unit built completely by the U.S. Army Engineers to help in caring for Ebola patients.Maj. Gen. Volesky explained that the facility has the capacity of 100 beds.  The construction lasted 23 days with the materials being procured both locally and abroad.He expressed gratitude to the Own Your Own community for their collaboration with the U.S. Army and support in the construction of the Ebola treatment unit.According to Maj. Gen. Volesky, “Three of the Ebola treatment units have been completed, including Bomi, Tubmanburg city, Sinje in  Grand Cape Mount, and this one in Buchanan,  Grand Bassa.  A total of 17 Ebola units are expected to be built across Liberia.”Also speaking, the Head of Ebola Disaster Assistant Response Team (DART) from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Mia Beers, said they are currently working to ensure the first 15 Ebola treatment units are built across Liberia. She explained that due to the nature of the epidemic in Liberia, the U.S. Government is focusing on building the first 15 units but will make sure that ETUs are in all of the counties to support the fight against Ebola.“We want to make sure that these Ebola treatment units are built in the 15 counties to help access rural areas and make sure that we follow  the transmission of the outbreak in all parts of Liberia and be able to fight it.”Ms. Beers said they are working with the Government of Liberia,  especially with the new strategies of fighting Ebola with emphasis on rural areas on how to put in place mechanisms to  contain the virus.She further explained that the most important thing is to have a rapid team out there working with county officials to ensure that every county can respond as quickly as possible to any outbreak in the area.She continued, “We have different ETU plans in the Southeast, including Fish Town, Greenville, River Cess, most importantly to look at health strategizes in the various counties in the fight against Ebola.  Rapid teams can really help us in the process. We are chasing after the suspected cases also in the southeastern areas, because they are hard to reach. “We are getting the rapid team setups from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the various county officials, and other partners as well as air transport to handle these cases.”The Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL), Brig/Gen Daniel Ziankahn, said they are working in collaboration with the U.S. Army in supporting the fight against the Ebola virus, including the construction of Ebola Treatment Units across Liberia.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more


Meet the Environmental Health Officer – Submitted

first_img– Advertisement -Have you ever taken a look around a restaurant and thought, “This place could use a good cleaning!”? Or perhaps your reaction was, “Wow, this place is so clean I would eat off the floor!” There are many areas an EHO’s work covers, but they all centre around keeping the public safe and healthy. A major component of the job is food inspections; from restaurant kitchens, to supermarkets, to the little vendor on the corner each summer. They are responsible for ensuring that any potentially hazardous food is handled in a manner promoting food safety. But that’s just one of their important roles.Advertisement You’ve heard of them; maybe seen them portrayed on TV or in a movie; perhaps you’ve actually met an Environmental Health Officer in person.  If that’s the case, you may already know that they do a lot more than just food inspections. The health and safety of drinking water supplies and recreational water operations are also a top priority and area of responsibility for an EHO. That includes everything from ensuring the safety of drinking water sources, to inspecting public pools, hot tubs and in some cases, beaches. Sarah NicklasonEnvironmental Health OfficerNorthern Health **SubmittedMeet the Environmental Health Officer Either way, you may also have wondered just whose responsibility it is to make sure that commercial kitchen operators maintain clean facilities, follow food safety rules, and practice good food hygiene. In BC, these people are called Environmental Health Officers (EHO) – in other jurisdictions, they are often called Public Health Inspectors. EHOs also inspect personal service facilities, for cleanliness and the prevention of health hazards. A personal service could range from a barber shop to a manicure facility to a tattoo parlour. That’s a lot of inspections! But that’s still not all an EHO does. Other tasks include making  recommendations on approvals of subdivisions; issuing holding tank permits; following up communicable disease and food borne illness reports; emergency preparedness; risk assessments;  complaint follow-up; health hazard investigations, and, educating the public on any and all of these topics.Advertisement For more information about environmental public health related issues, contact your local health unit and ask to speak to an Environmental Health Officer. And the next time you’re in your favourite restaurant, take a look around for a food permit. It’s your way of knowing the EHO has already been there, working to protect your health! Summer camps and industrial camps are also inspected on a routine basis.  Each camp must pass a food, drinking water and general camp inspection as well as have appropriate sewage disposal. last_img read more