University abandons plans to establish joint college in China

first_imgThe University is no longer pursuing plans to establish a joint college with Zhejiang University (ZJU) in China, according to a letter addressed to faculty from J. Nicholas Entrikin, vice president and associate provost for internationalization, sent Monday morning.Eric Richelsen Although Notre Dame will continue to foster a relationship with ZJU through exchange programs and research projects, the two universities decided not to embark on the joint venture due to challenges that arose during the deliberation process, Entrikin said in the letter.“After many hopeful and positive conversations on both curricular and administrative matters related to the joint college, we were more easily able to discriminate and to delineate some of the key challenges as well as advantages in bringing together two very different approaches to higher education,” Entrikin said. “Thorough effort was expended in addressing these complexities, and at times the conversations showed exhilarating signs of progress.“In the end, however, some areas remained challenging for both universities, and we decided that broader cooperation would be a more effective means for achieving our common interests.”Entrikin and Jonathan Noble, acting executive director for the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies, wrote a white paper addressed to Notre Dame faculty members in October 2014 explaining the possible collaboration between the two schools.The white paper said the joint liberal arts college aimed to “advance Notre Dame’s global academic reputation; promote worldwide Notre Dame’s unique and successful blend of teaching, research and service and offer opportunities for Notre Dame faculty and students to gain valuable experience teaching and studying in China.”According to the original white paper proposal, the Notre Dame-ZJU joint liberal arts college would have opened the 2017-2018 academic year. The student body would have been composed of 70 percent Chinese students and 30 percent international students. The college’s faculty would have been composed of members from both universities, and graduating students would have received a joint degree from both Notre Dame and ZJU.Over the past two years, faculty advisory delegations from both universities have made multiple campus visits — to both South Bend and Haining — to examine the project, Entrikin said. The committee reached its final conclusion after the most recent visit to China, made by a delegation that included Entrikin, University President Fr. John Jenkins, Vice President for Mission Engagement and Church Affairs Fr. William Lies and several members of the Board of Trustees.Entrikin said both universities have “gained a more comprehensive mutual understanding” and have agreed to continue discussions about future forms of collaboration. This summer, the University will host eight ZJU rising seniors participating in Notre Dame International’s iSURE program, which allows international students to participate in engineering and science research on campus.Ultimately, Entrikin said the experience has helped the University plan and develop current and new international programs, especially those in China.“Our Zhejiang colleagues now better understand what it means to be an excellent Catholic university, and we now better understand the academic achievements and aspirations of one of China’s leading universities,” he said. “On the foundation of this newly acquired shared understanding, we may now begin to proceed rapidly in building substantial and innovative partnership programs that will benefit both of our academic communities.”Tags: China, joint college, Zhejiang partnership, zhejiang University, ZJUlast_img read more


NCUA provides guidance on fixed-asset rule, now in effect

first_imgThe National Credit Union’s (NCUA’s) fixed-assets final rule is effective as of Oct. 2, and the agency has provided several pieces of guidance for credit unions. In a supervisory letter (SL-15-03), the NCUA’s Office of Examination and Insurance provides information for agency field staff, while a letter to credit unions (15-CU-06) provides information on examination priorities.The fixed-assets rule was finalized by the NCUA in July. It removed the 5% cap on fixed assets and established a six-year time period of partial occupancy of premises. CUNA generally supported the proposal, but urged the NCUA to provide guidance.The final rule also eliminated existing and pending waivers of the 5% limit on fixed assets. Waivers associated with other parts of the rule, such as the occupancy requirements, remain in effect.According to its letter to federally insured credit unions, examiners will no longer focus on fixed assets, unless any of the following conditions occur: continue reading » 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


World Cup: FIFA Drops Plans to Expand Qatar 2022 to 48…

first_imgGianni Infantino FIFA also said it explored the possibility of Qatar hosting a 48-team tournament on its own but has decided not to pursue those plans as there was not enough time “for a detailed assessment of the potential logistical impact”.In November, UEFA President Aleksander Ceferin said adding 16 teams to Qatar 2022 could create “many problems” and described the idea as “quite unrealistic”.In January 2017, FIFA voted unanimously in favour of increasing the World Cup to 48 teams for the 2026 event – which will be held in the United States, Canada and Mexico.In October 2018 Infantino said “we have to see if it is possible” to bring the expansion forward to 2022.Infantino has been a strong advocate of the expansion and said the World Cup has to be “more inclusive”.“We are in the 21st century and we have to shape the World Cup of the 21st century,” he said when announcing the change.“It is the future. Football is more than just Europe and South America, football is global.”The expansion in 2026 will see an initial stage of 16 groups of three teams precede a knockout stage for the remaining 32.The number of tournament matches will rise to 80, from 64, but the eventual winners will still play only seven games.The tournament will be completed within 32 days – a measure to appease powerful European clubs, who objected to reform because of a crowded international schedule.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Plans to expand the 2022 World Cup to 48 teams have been abandoned by FIFA.FIFA President Gianni Infantino said last year the expansion from 32 teams could be brought forward from 2026 to the 2022 tournament in Qatar.The change would have required Qatar to share hosting duties with other countries in the region.World football’s governing body said after a “thorough and comprehensive consultation process” the change “could not be made now”.last_img read more