University abandons plans to establish joint college in China

first_imgThe University is no longer pursuing plans to establish a joint college with Zhejiang University (ZJU) in China, according to a letter addressed to faculty from J. Nicholas Entrikin, vice president and associate provost for internationalization, sent Monday morning.Eric Richelsen Although Notre Dame will continue to foster a relationship with ZJU through exchange programs and research projects, the two universities decided not to embark on the joint venture due to challenges that arose during the deliberation process, Entrikin said in the letter.“After many hopeful and positive conversations on both curricular and administrative matters related to the joint college, we were more easily able to discriminate and to delineate some of the key challenges as well as advantages in bringing together two very different approaches to higher education,” Entrikin said. “Thorough effort was expended in addressing these complexities, and at times the conversations showed exhilarating signs of progress.“In the end, however, some areas remained challenging for both universities, and we decided that broader cooperation would be a more effective means for achieving our common interests.”Entrikin and Jonathan Noble, acting executive director for the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies, wrote a white paper addressed to Notre Dame faculty members in October 2014 explaining the possible collaboration between the two schools.The white paper said the joint liberal arts college aimed to “advance Notre Dame’s global academic reputation; promote worldwide Notre Dame’s unique and successful blend of teaching, research and service and offer opportunities for Notre Dame faculty and students to gain valuable experience teaching and studying in China.”According to the original white paper proposal, the Notre Dame-ZJU joint liberal arts college would have opened the 2017-2018 academic year. The student body would have been composed of 70 percent Chinese students and 30 percent international students. The college’s faculty would have been composed of members from both universities, and graduating students would have received a joint degree from both Notre Dame and ZJU.Over the past two years, faculty advisory delegations from both universities have made multiple campus visits — to both South Bend and Haining — to examine the project, Entrikin said. The committee reached its final conclusion after the most recent visit to China, made by a delegation that included Entrikin, University President Fr. John Jenkins, Vice President for Mission Engagement and Church Affairs Fr. William Lies and several members of the Board of Trustees.Entrikin said both universities have “gained a more comprehensive mutual understanding” and have agreed to continue discussions about future forms of collaboration. This summer, the University will host eight ZJU rising seniors participating in Notre Dame International’s iSURE program, which allows international students to participate in engineering and science research on campus.Ultimately, Entrikin said the experience has helped the University plan and develop current and new international programs, especially those in China.“Our Zhejiang colleagues now better understand what it means to be an excellent Catholic university, and we now better understand the academic achievements and aspirations of one of China’s leading universities,” he said. “On the foundation of this newly acquired shared understanding, we may now begin to proceed rapidly in building substantial and innovative partnership programs that will benefit both of our academic communities.”Tags: China, joint college, Zhejiang partnership, zhejiang University, ZJUlast_img read more


Rain hampers rescue efforts after deadly Japan floods

first_img“Some roads are submerged and you cannot drive through them.”In one of the hardest-hit areas, residents wrote out the words “rice, water, SOS” on the ground, while others waved towels and called for rescue and relief goods.At a nursing home for the elderly, 14 people were feared dead when water from a nearby river inundated the ground floor, leaving those in wheelchairs unable to reach higher ground.Emergency services, aided by locals in rafts, managed to rescue around 50 staff and residents from the facility, bringing them to safety by boat.Heavy rain is expected to continue through Tuesday afternoon and the Japan Meteorological Agency issued a non-compulsory evacuation order for around half a million people in southwestern Japan.Up to 250 millimeters of rain is expected in the 24-hour period through Tuesday morning in the southern part of Kyushu Island, which includes areas already hit hard by the flooding, the agency said.”It’s such a mess,” resident Hirotoshi Nishi told public broadcaster NHK as he swept debris from his mud-strewn front room. “Many pieces of wood came into my house. I don’t know what to do.”Hirokazu Kosaki, a 75-year-old bus driver in the town of Ashikita, told Jiji press: “It was nothing but water as far as I could see.” Topics : Evacuation orders Evacuation efforts are also being hampered by fears of spreading the coronavirus that has claimed almost 1,000 victims in Japan, with close to 20,000 cases.Partitions have been set up at evacuation centers to keep distance between families and evacuees are made to wash their hands frequently, sanitize and wear face masks.For some local business owners already battered by coronavirus, the natural disaster has compounded their problems.Yuji Hashimoto, who runs a tourism bureau in the hot-spring resort in Yatsushiro, one of the flood-hit cities in Kumamoto, told AFP that the “beautiful tourism spot dramatically changed overnight.””The damage was beyond our imagination. It’s literally a bolt from the blue… The disaster is a double-whammy as our hot spring resort was struggling to weather the impact of coronavirus. We don’t know what will happen to us next,” he said.Government spokesman Yoshihide Suga told reporters that 19 people had been confirmed dead from the floods while a further six were in a state of “cardio-respiratory arrest” — a term often used in Japan before a doctor officially certifies death.Suga said officials were investigating another 24 deaths to confirm a direct link to the floods.He said more than 40,000 personnel from police and fire departments, the coast guard and Self-Defense troops were conducting search and rescue operations throughout the night.Around 800 people had been rescued, Suga said, adding that 4,600 households were still without power and 7,000 without water.Japan is currently in the middle of its annual rainy season which frequently delivers deadly floods and landslides.Climate change is also playing a role because a warmer atmosphere holds more water, increasing the risk and intensity of flooding from extreme rainfall.In 2018, more than 200 people died in devastating floods in the same region of Japan. Driving rain hampered the efforts of tens of thousands of rescue workers in southwestern Japan on Monday as they searched for survivors from deadly floods and landslides, with more torrential downpours forecast.Around 50 people were feared dead after heavy rain lashed areas of western Japan beginning early Saturday, causing rivers to burst their banks and flood low-lying regions.Bad weather was preventing some rescue efforts, local officials said, with at least 13 people still unaccounted for. “Because of the heavy rain, we were forced to cancel some emergency flights of helicopters over the disaster zone,” Tsubasa Miyamoto, an official from the Kumamoto region, told AFP.Although the rain has eased from its peak, the floods washed away roads and bridges, leaving many in isolated communities cut off.A local firefighter in the western region of Kagoshima told AFP they had deployed boats to rescue 11 people, but conditions were making it hard to reach others stranded. “Calls came from people telling us that they wanted to flee their home but they could not do it on their own,” he said.last_img read more


Florida High School Student Gets into All Eight Ivy League Schools

first_imgA North Florida high school student has quite a decision to make on his college education.Craig McFarland,a student at Stanton College Preparatory School in Jacksonville, recently learned that he has been accepted to all eight Ivy League schools.The teen, who has a 4.98 grade point average and and has never gotten a “B” on his high school report card, is unsure which university he will ultimately attend.“With coronavirus, I can’t do that, so the only metric that I have is based on experiences of current students and their virtual campus tours,” McFarland says.CONGRATULATIONS! Craig McFarland, senior at Stanton College Preparatory School, is the newest member of a very exclusive club: The “I Was Accepted into Every Ivy League University In The Country Club.” #TeamDuval #WeHaveThatFull Story: https://t.co/ep0gwfw1g8— DCPS (@DuvalSchools) April 21, 2020 He heard from Yale first, and then received acceptance letters from Harvard, Princeton, Columbia, University of Pennsylvania, Brown, Dartmouth, and Cornell.“With each school, I was more and more in shock,” adds McFarland, who says he plans to study medicine or law.According to Craig’s mother, Donabel Santiago, he has always demonstrated strong initiative.The single mom explains, “I’m very proud of him. I have three kids and I told them I don’t accept a ‘B’ as a grade because I know that they can bring me A’s.”last_img read more