Virat Kohli’s ability to dominate in all formats makes him special: Kane Williamson

first_imgAhead of the three-match Test series against India, New Zealand skipper Kane Williamson on Tuesday hailed host skipper Virat Kohli’s ability to dominate in all the three formats of the game as “special”.Addressing reporters ahead of the Black Caps’ three-day practice game against Mumbai, starting on Friday at the Feroz Shah Kotla ground here, Williamson named Kohli as one of the players, whom the Kiwis will look out for during the Test series.”Virat (Kohli) is a great player. The ability to dominate in all three formats like he does is something very special and certainly something that I admire. I love watching him play,” Williamson said.”There are a lot of good players in the Indian team whom we will have to look out for. Virat is one of those players, against whom we have to be at our very best.”The 26-year-old right-hander, who is often counted in the same bracket as Kohli along with Australia skipper Steve Smith and England batsman Joe Root, said each player has his own style and game plan which sets him apart from each other. (Also read: Adapting quickly to Indian conditions will be key for New Zealand: Ish Sodhi to India Today)”Smith, Root are both great players as well and I think all different players have different strengths, trying to stick to their own game plans, their own strengths and I suppose there lies the beauty of the game.”TOUGH CHALLENGE AHEADWilliamson, who is part of the Sunrisers Hyderabad franchise in the Indian Premier League (IPL), admitted playing India at home is one of the toughest challenges.advertisement”We know it will be a challenge. India in their home conditions is one of the toughest challenges in the game, specially in the longest format. New Zealand is quite excited to take them on, specially after returning from Zimbabwe and South Africa where the conditions are quite different,” he said.”We have a number of guys in the team who have been a part of the IPL for a few years now and no doubt those experiences help.””The format is different and the focus is on Test cricket at the moment but still I suppose those conditions are something that we can draw from little bit to try and help in preparations going into this series. It’s a different format, we’ll have to prepare well.””During the previous series in India (against South Africa), spin certainly played a huge part and I think batting was difficult. I have no doubt it will be a bit of a scare, so spin from both teams will play a big part. We have three good spinners and it should be a good contest,” he added.PLAYING SPIN PROPERLY THE KEYExpecting a spin-dominated series, Kiwi coach Mike Hesson, who was seated beside the captain, said the team will bank on the previous experiences of playing in sub-continent conditions. (Also read: New Zealand eye reverse swing to escape India’s spin trap)”We spent a lot of time in Bulawayo in Zimbabwe before South Africa, so that was a pretty much spin dominant series (against Zimbabwe) and was in similar conditions and pace with what we expect in India.”It’s very difficult for us to replicate those conditions at home, so the week ahead of the first Test is crucial for recovery and preparing individual game plans but most of the players have played here before and certainly had success in the sub-continent and we will certainly go on that experience as well,” he said.Going into the high-profile series, New Zealand’s biggest headache will be the form of swashbuckling opener Martin Guptill, who recently scored 7, 8 and 0 from the Test series defeat in South Africa.But Williamson is unfazed with the recent slump, and backed the 29-year-old as a world class cricketer.”Martin (Guptil) has been working very hard. We know that he is a world class cricketer and he has shown that a lot in the white ball format and certainly we are backing him to do well with the red ball,” he said.last_img read more


Educational Assessment Centre Opens in Mandeville

first_img The parish of Manchester now has a diagnostic and care centre, which will cater to the special learning needs of children with autism and cognitive challenges.The Educational Assessment and Resource Centre, located on the grounds of Church Teachers’ College in Mandeville, was built by the Government at a cost of $35 million.It boosts two play and learning rooms, observation room, a nurses’ station, an administrative section, as well as lunchroom, bathrooms, offices and laboratories.On staff are a special educational psychologist, a clinical psychologist, and special education teachers. The spacious two-storey structure will open to the public on March 11.Minister of Education, Youth and Information, Senator the Hon Ruel Reid, said that the establishment of the centre is in keeping with Government’s focus on ensuring that the education system is inclusive and enables students to maximise their full potential. Minister of Education, Youth and Information, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, delivers the keynote address at the opening of the Educational Assessment and Resource Centre at the Church Teachers’ College in Mandeville, Manchester, on February 19. The Educational Assessment and Resource Centre, located on the grounds of Church Teachers’ College in Mandeville, was built by the Government at a cost of $35 million. Story Highlights The parish of Manchester now has a diagnostic and care centre, which will cater to the special learning needs of children with autism and cognitive challenges.center_img “We are going to use the diagnostic centre to make sure that no child is left behind in the region,” he said, noting that it will customise learning through the use of technology.He was delivering the keynote address at the official opening of the centre on February 19.Senator Reid said that global figures indicate that one in every 10 students is likely to have severe special needs.He noted further there are persons with mild autism, who go undetected. “Indeed, one in every 42 boys is autistic and one in every 167 girls is autistic. Autism is on a spectrum of mild to severe. Some of the challenges faced in the classroom are because this goes undetected,” he said.The Education Minister said that in addition to establishing assessment and diagnostic centres, increased focus will be placed on an early stimulation/intervention strategy that addresses needs during the first 1,000 days of the child’s life.The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has said that the period spanning between conception and one’s second birthday is when the foundations of optimum health, growth and neurodevelopment across the lifespan are established.“Learning begins from conception because the first 1,000 days from conception to age two is a key age; two is the highest point of their cognitive neurological development (brain capacity)” Minister Reid added.In his remarks, Jamaica Teachers’ Association (JTA) President, Dr. Garth Anderson, said the body has been advocating for the early assessment of students entering the education system at the early-childhood level for the purpose of developing a learning profile and targeted intervention.Jamaica Teachers’ Association (JTA) President, Dr. Garth Anderson, addresses the official opening of the Educational Assessment and Resource Centre at Church Teachers’ College in Mandeville, Manchester, on February 19. It boosts two play and learning rooms, observation room, a nurses’ station, an administrative section, as well as lunchroom, bathrooms, offices and laboratories. Dr. Anderson, who is also Principal of Church Teachers’ College, urged that the diagnostic centre be fully utilised to “fulfil its mission of not only assessing students but to also be effective in changing the way in which we do teaching and learning”.last_img read more