Maritime Firms Team Up with Tech Startups to Drive Innovation

first_imgCopenhagen-based corporate innovation and venture development firm Rainmaking has matched five maritime giants with eight startups as part of its Trade & Transport Impact Programme.Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG (HHLA), Shell, Wärtsilä, Cargotec and Inmarsat have been paired up with startup teams from eight different countries.As informed, they will work on thirteen separate projects with the aim of accelerating innovation that delivers genuine business results.“There is growing recognition that the maritime industry needs to innovate and fast. As appetite for fresh thinking, insight, and technology swells, bringing together established maritime leaders with technology startups is what’s needed to deliver genuine business results quickly,” Nicklas Viby Fursund, Partner at Rainmaking, commented.“With our current partners; Cargotec, HHLA, Inmarsat, Shell, and Wärtsilä, we’re already seeing tangible benefits emerging from the programme. It’s exciting to see the genuine impact quality tech startups with high engagement and energy levels can make, helping to solve the problems the corporates are facing and adding value to operations.”With an industry awakening to the challenges of adjusting to an increasingly digital and decarbonized world, business as usual is not an option. Designed to tackle some of the biggest challenges in maritime trade and transport, the abovementioned program aims to disrupt the industry through its collaborative, outcome-oriented approach.The specialisms of the startups in the current round of the program range from port- and cyber security to energy-optimization and crew welfare. Current projects relate to safety, security and crew welfare, optimization of port and vessel operations, and autonomous operations and equipment. “We have had great success working with Scoutbase, whose technology collects data to reduce human error. Our business has been hugely engaged – everyone is really keen and loves the energy that Scoutbase has brought to the table, as well as the product itself. Going forward in 2020 we are really excited to hopefully start rolling this product out,” Michael Andronicou, Project Lead – New Marine Ventures at Shell, said.“We’re working with KoiReader to make improvements in the detection of container damage. While it’s currently a proof of concept, we hope to continue with the project and without Rainmaking’s Trade and Transport Impact Programme, we probably would never have met KoiReader,” Till Schlumberger, Strategy Consultant in Digital Transformation at HHLA, added.“Energy efficiency is one of the most important factors in shipping today, and we are trying to find new ways of improving it. Signol has enabled us to reach the decision makers onboard and better support them with fuel consumption, energy efficiency and operations. We need to bring in startups and knowledge from outside the industry to support us in finding ways to do things better,” Steffen Knodt, Director New Ventures at Wärtsilä, explained.The third cycle of the program begins in Q1 2020 at which point more organizations will be able to join.Rainmaking is also launching a decarbonization program in Singapore, which specifically focuses on startups with solutions that support the transition to a zero-carbon future for shipping.last_img read more

Alewijnse’s Electrical Package for De Beers’ New Mining Vessel

first_imgAlewijnse has secured a contract to supply complete electrical package on board De Beers Marine Namibia’s newest Additional Mining Vessel 3 (AMV3).Alewijnse is working with the Damen Shipyard Mangalia in Romania, where the vessel is being built.The AMV3 is a complex vessel and the build involves partners from the mining industry as well as the maritime sector.This involves a 300-tonne crawler machine which deploys a mechanical arm that moves in a horizontal arc, dredging material from the seafloor immediately below the hull at depths of around 130m. A large onboard processing plant then sifts the dredged gravel on board the ship, removing the diamonds and sealing them in metal canisters.Another large and complex system is the seven thruster, DP2 dynamic positioning system that will be powered by six generators of 3,230 ekW each.The first steel was cut for the vessel in May 2019 and now Alewijnse is preparing to start work on board.A team of over 200 skilled technicians will work on the project until December 2020, and the vessel is due to begin work off the coast of Namibia in 2022.Alewijnse project manager Catalin Androne said: “We look forward to starting on board. This is a new type of vessel for us and our first time at the Mangalia yard so we will be learning a great deal as we proceed, but it’s always good to be working with Damen. The time allowed for the works is very tight, but we are quite used to that! Good coordination and effective planning will be the keys to success and our own steelwork team will also be a valuable asset.”“We won this contract based on our reputation and years of experience on special projects,” said Petrica Craciun, sales manager at Alewijnse Marine Galati, “And we have worked with the Damen Group on challenging one-off projects before. This will be our first time at Damen Shipyards Mangalia but once again we will have the opportunity to demonstrate our know-how, flexibility and our capabilities beyond conventional ships and into sophisticated, special-purpose vessels.”last_img read more

Council web filter blocks marriage site as ‘hate’

first_imgOtago Daily Times 23 Aug 2012An automated web content filter for the Dunedin City Council’s internal network has deemed a Family First New Zealand website on traditional marriage a “hate” site, and blocked access for staff. The block on the “Protect Marriage” website, which promotes marriage between a man and a woman, has outraged Family First NZ director Bob McCoskrie, who says it is discriminatory and the result of an agenda being pushed either by someone at the council, or at the content filter company. “It’s part of a culture war that is going on at the moment. Activists are working hard to eliminate all opposing debate on this important family issue – as we experienced with the unprecedented hacking of our website when first launched.” The council says there was no conscious decision to block the site. Mr McCoskrie said the lobby group was contacted by a city council staff member who, he said, was “stunned” when they tried to access the website to sign the group’s petition against a Labour Party Bill to legalise gay marriage, and was told the site was deemed “hate” and that the web page “contravenes Dunedin City Council’s acceptable usage policy”. “The staff member’s response was that ‘if the concept that marriage should be between a man and a woman is offensive, then I despair for the future of this country’. We agree,” Mr McCoskrie said.Council communications and marketing manager Graham McKerracher said the council did not control the filtering process, which was done by a United States company. When the company was employed, the council gave it broad categories of offensive content it wanted limited in its internal network. The company’s filter automatically scanned sites for words or phrases that placed sites in those categories and sites deemed offensive were automatically blocked. Mr McKerracher could not say why the Protect Marriage site was blocked. But a block meant the site, or someone leaving a comment on the site, might have used language determined by the filter to be offensive, resulting in the site being put on a banned list. Comments could not be left on the site and he was confident none of the administrators or owners of the site had previously done anything that could be construed as offensive or “hate” related, Mr McCoskrie said. “My challenge to them is to produce the evidence.” Council staff were still able to access gay marriage websites, and at least two other websites blacklisted by web filters at other companies. “It is highly hypocritical and inconsistent that one side of the debate can be blocked, but not the other. This is discrimination at its worst and [the council] seems to be initiating their own version of hate speech laws.” Mr McKerracher said if sites promoting gay marriage had not been picked up by the same filter it was because no offending words or phrases that placed them in a category that was blocked were identified. He said any staff member who wanted to fill out the petition could do so at home.http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/222778/council-web-filter-blocks-marriage-site-hatelast_img read more

How abortion impacts mothers, families and our society – Study

first_imgIMFC 12 May 2014Executive SummaryThis paper examines research that is typically ignored about abortion’s effect on the family. The impact of abortion on marriage, sexuality, mental health and finally, family life in greater society are all considered. The paper reflects on the research through the story of Lee, one pro-choice woman for whom abortion had an unexpected effect as told in the book Giving Sorrow Words.The effects of abortion on the family and society are secondary effects. Yet there are indeed consequences that remain substantially underpublicized—to our great detriment. These include an increased likelihood of divorce or separation, marrying late or not at all, increased acceptance of rape and increased risks of poor mental health, among others. A meta-analysis published in the prestigious British Journal of Psychiatry showed an overall 81% greater risk of mental health problems for women who had an abortion compared with those who did not.It is not helpful to overstate negative ramifications of abortion. However, by far the bigger concern Canadians face today is the problem of pretending there are none.This paper aims to challenge the notion that abortion is an individual event, as presented in political mantras like “my body, my choice.” Abortion is hard on the woman, yes. However, an abortion is the result of relationship, regardless of how poor or short-lived. Therefore, examining the effects of abortion on family, relationships and our communities is important.Download PDF:     Interconnected: How abortion impacts mothers, families and our societyhttp://www.imfcanada.org/interconnectedlast_img read more

Smacking ban law plan for Wales is dropped

first_imgBBC News 22 January 2015Proposals to introduce a law to ban smacking children in Wales have been dropped.The assembly’s communities, equality and local government committee had considered including the ban as part of a new law to tackle domestic violence.However, Public Services Minister Leighton Andrews said it was the “wrong vehicle” to introduce such a law.Committee chair Christine Chapman said she was disappointed the government “cannot yet do the right thing”.In October 2011 assembly members voted in favour of banning the defence of “reasonable chastisement” for smacking.But the then minister responsible for children, Gwenda Thomas, ruled out legislation before the 2016 assembly election, citing the need for preparatory work amid fears of “criminalising” parents.http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-30935832last_img read more

Family First launches High Court appeal against being stripped of charitable status

first_imgStuff co.nz 26 September 2017Family First Comment: Hold your horses, Charities Board!Controversial conservative lobby group Family First is appealing against being stripped of its charitable status by the Charities Registration Board.The board’s decision was made public in August. It was the second time it had tried to deregister the group.“Family First will appeal this decision as far as we need to because of the threat it places on us and other charities and their freedom to speak and advocate on behalf of their supporters in a civil society,” national director Bob McCoskrie said in a statement on Tuesday.The group has lodged an appeal in the High Court at Wellington to fight the deregistration.McCoskrie said the group had also successfully applied for an order that the board be restrained from deregistering the group until the appeal was heard.The board can direct charities to be removed from its register when they do not advance a charitable purpose for the public benefit and it is in the public interest to remove them.The group promotes traditional family values, is anti-abortion and considers marriage to be only between a man and a woman.“The board considers that Family First has a purpose to promote its own particular views about marriage and the traditional family that cannot be determined to be for the public benefit in a way previously accepted as charitable,” a statement from the board last month read.In 2013, the board made the decision to remove the group from the Charities Register because it did not advance exclusively charitable purposes.Family First appealed against that decision to the High Court.In June 2015, the High Court directed the board to reconsider its decision in light of the 2014 Supreme Court Greenpeace judgment and its own judgment.https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/97276959/family-first-launches-high-court-appeal-against-being-stripped-of-charitable-statuslast_img read more

ASA rejects complaints about anti-cannabis billboard

first_imgAdvertising Standards Authority rejects complaints about anti-cannabis billboardNewsHub 30 April 2019 The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has rejected complaints about an anti-cannabis billboard.Family First New Zealand funded the billboard, which displayed on a building beside the Southern Motorway in Auckland.It reads “You can’t legalise marijuana and promote mental health,” in large letters.Underneath this, it reads “Don’t legalise.”On Tuesday, the Complaints Board ruled the advertisement “did not contain anything indecent, exploitative or degrading, did not cause fear or distress and was socially responsible.”The ASA also ruled the billboard was unlikely to mislead consumers.A previous billboard from Family First NZ received multiple complaints earlier this year.This billboard was emblazoned with the slogan “Marijuana has a kids menu,” with photographs of various cannabis paraphernalia, some of which appeared to look like lollies.Seven complaints were received about this advert, with concern being the billboard was misleading, unsubstantiated and played on fear.In February, ASA ruled the billboard did not contain anything indecent, or degrading. It also ruled the advert didn’t cause fear or distress, and was socially responsible.“Drug use is a major health issue, and that’s why the role of the law is so important,” said National Director of Family First NZ Bob McCoskrie in a statement on Tuesday.“The public of New Zealand are not getting this information. Our billboards are designed to raise these inconvenient truths – and to provoke debate and discussion.”Family First NZ is an organization that seeks to promote “strong families, marriage and the value of life.”The organisation is vehemently against the legalisation of cannabis, saying it would be “foolish.”“The illegality of the drug and other drugs is vital as we fight the devastation its use causes on the users, their families and society in general,” they said in a statement in February.Family First NZ also led the opposition to the 2007 anti-smacking law, and the 2013 same sex marriage bill.https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2019/04/advertising-standards-authority-rejects-complaints-about-anti-cannabis-billboard.htmllast_img read more

A Quebec court has invalidated parts of the medical aid in dying laws

first_imgMontreal CTV News 11 September 2019Family First Comment:This is the slippery slope. The bill being debated by our Parliament at the moment is simply the ‘foot in the door’ – as evidenced by overseas experience.“A Quebec Superior Court judge has invalidated sections of both the laws on medically assisted dying, ruling Wednesday they were too restrictive and therefore unconstitutional.”#rejectassistedsuicideA Quebec Superior Court judge has invalidated sections of both the federal and Quebec laws on medically assisted dying, ruling Wednesday they were too restrictive and therefore unconstitutional.Justice Christine Baudouin found in favour of two Quebecers struck by incurable degenerative diseases who’d argued they were denied a medically assisted death under laws that are discriminatory.Baudouin ruled invalid the Criminal Code requirement that a natural death be “reasonably foreseeable” before someone can be eligible for assisted death. The condition has prevented some people from accessing the end-of-life procedure. She also invalidated a section of the Quebec law that says people must “be at the end of life.”Baudouin suspended application of the judgment for six months to give federal and provincial legislators a chance to modify the laws.But the court granted an exemption to Truchon and Gladu, allowing them to seek medical aid in dying during this period if they satisfy other conditions in the law.The laws in place deprived them of the right to have “a dignified and serene death”, she wrote in her lengthy decision.Baudouin, who heard from witnesses in January, agreed the rules governing who was entitled to medical assistance in dying were too restrictive and discriminatory.READ MORE: https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/a-quebec-court-has-invalidated-parts-of-the-medical-aid-in-dying-laws-1.4588622Keep up with family issues in NZ.last_img read more

Why New Zealand’s law lacks necessary detail to make a fully informed decision

first_imgNewsHub 12 July 2020Family First Comment: There are so many crucial points made in this piece that it’s difficult to know which bit to highlight. So take the time to read it all!As Rhona Winnington – a registered nurse, sociologist and lecturer at the Auckland University of Technology (AUT) – concludes:“We need to safeguard our families and communities from these social consequences of assisted dying legislation. Vulnerable populations have to remain safe from persuasion to die and there has to be a supportive framework for those left behind after an assisted death, so they can grieve without feeling stigmatised.”When New Zealanders go to the polls in September, they will also be asked to vote in a referendum on assisted dying.Parliament already passed the End of Life Choice Act in 2019, but the referendum will decide whether it comes into force.We will be asked if we accept or decline the right of people to seek an assisted death, without the need for consultation with family and with no stand-down period other than a requirement of 48 hours to prepare the medication. The act would allow people to choose when they die and by what means, whether the medication is self-administered or given by suitably qualified clinicians.This appears an ideal scenario, affirming the right to choose, but it is a deeply profound decision for the public to make. Many may be unaware of issues beyond the goal of ending suffering for people with life-limiting conditions.My research shows an assisted death can have repercussions for many people – those left behind or others struggling with a chronic disease. Experiences from countries where assisted dying has been legal for some time have highlighted these challenges.Social consequences of assisted dyingIn the Netherlands, assisted dying has been legal for 18 years. Over time, there have been notable slips in the criteria that have to be met. This includes the level of physical suffering, which is a subjective experience, and the requirement that people must be competent to agree to an assisted death at the point of administration. This may not be possible for people with dementia who have previously given written consent but can no longer consent at the point of death.While the law hasn’t changed, its interpretation has, and people with mental illness can now also request an assisted death. Data from the Netherlands show one in 30 people now die by euthanasia, compared to one in 90 when the law was introduced in 2002.In the US, some medical insurance companies pay for an assisted death but not for palliative care. This removes any notion of choice and autonomy from the person.In Canada, where assisted dying has been legal for four years, the number of people seeking medical help to die has risen significantly, with figures more than doubling year on year. This has exposed unexpected consequences, such as fear of judgement for leaving family members unsupported after an assisted death and stigmatisation of clinicians, whether or not they support people choosing the time of their death.READ MORE: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2020/07/euthanasia-referendum-why-new-zealand-s-law-lacks-necessary-detail-to-make-a-fully-informed-decision.htmllast_img read more

ISIS accepts Boko Haram’s allegiance pledge

first_imgBoko Haram’s pledge of allegiance to the Islamic militant group ISIS,has been accepted.ISIS accepted the pledge in a recorded audio message which is however yet to be verified.ISIS’ media arm, al-Furqan, released an audio statement by spokesman Abu Mohammed al-Adnani that claimed the group’s self-proclaimed caliphate had expanded to West Africa.Al Adnani had previously urged fighters from around the world to migrate and join Boko Haram.The announcement comes  as both groups struggled against increased military pressure in recent days.ISIS is battling against Iraqi forces seeking to recapture Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit, while coming under fire from U.S.-led coalition air strikes in other parts of the country and in Syria.In the meantime, Boko Haram is under fire from a multinational force which combines the armies of Chad, Cameroon and Nigeria. Boko Haram has so far lost ground in towns that have been retaken the army according to military sources.   Analysts say there’s no other reason for Boko Haram combining forces with ISIS except for the sole reason of wanting to keep its media activities more alive.  It’s new Twitter account, increasingly slick and with more frequent video messages and a new media arm all  considered signs that the group is now being helped by ISIS propagandists.Boko Haram began it’s military campaign to impose Islamist rule in northern Nigeria in 2009.The conflict has since spread to neighboring states. Abubakar Shekau is the purpoted leader of Boko Haramlast_img read more