Past the finishing post

first_imgCaymanas Park Results for Jan 30, 2016Track Condition : Dirt : GoodRace 1 1400 M (Purse $560,000) NB4-Y-O & UP RESTRICTED ALLOWANCE III(NW3 O/T)ALEX’S IMPORTS LIMITED PLAQUE* 1. SOUTHERN CRUISE SEllis 54.52. DREAMCOMETRUE RHalledeen 53.5 13/4L3. BALLON D’OR OMullings 51.0 1/2L4. STAN ROY LSteadman3 53.5 3 1/2LWIN: $55.00PLACE: $50.00, $50.00, $50.00Final Time : 1:26.3 Splits : 24.0, 46.4, 1:12.2,Winner : 4yo ch colt – WEEKEND CRUISE -f HONKEYTONKVILLETrainer: ANTHONY NUNES Owner : HYDE VALLEY FARMSBred by KARL SAMUDAQu: $90.00 Ex: $105.00Trifecta: $42.00Race 2 1000 M (R) (Purse $500,000) NB4-Y-O & UP MAIDEN SPECIAL WEIGHTO & S TACK ROOM & SUPPLIES PLAQUE*1. SIR LEYLAND HALL RNelson 55.02. ACROSSMYHEART AndrePowell4 51.0 8L3. PLAY BACK AntThomas4 50.0 9/1 1 1/4L4. CONNOR DDawkins4 51.0 15/1 1 3/4LWIN: $79.00PLACE: $63.00, $116.00, $62.00Final Time : 1:02.0 Splits : 23.2, 47.2Winner : 4yo b colt – FEARLESS VISION – CHIKINEYTrainer : PAUL HYLTON Owner : BALLYDOYLEBred by ORANGE VALLEY ESTATES LTD.Qu: $958.00 Ex: $1,333.00D/E: $92.00Superfecta: $16,320.00Race 3 1500 M (Purse $768,000) NB3YO(NW2)&IMP3YO&UP(MDN)-REST.ALL.IIB3 DEVELOPMENT GROUP PLAQUE*1. NUCLEAR AFFAIR DaneNelson 53.02. ORPHEUS SEllis 53.5 1 1/4L3. STUNNER OWhite 50.0 4 1/4L4. GLYDER NBerger4 46.0 6LWIN: $58.00PLACE: $50.00, $51.00, $53.00Final Time : 1:33.0 Splits : 24.1, 47.0, 1:11.3,Winner : 3yo filly – NUCLEAR WAYNE – COMMANDRA AFFAIRTrainer : GARY SUBRATIE Owner : MICHROSBred by MICHAEL BERNARDQu: $104.00 Ex: $128.00D/E: $119.00Trifecta: $183.00Rolling Triple: $129.00Race 4 1200 M (Purse $500,000) 3-Y-O & UP CLM(180,0)/NB6YO&UP(NW3)MCKAY SECURITY PLAQUE1. EL CLIENTE OEdwards3 54.0 *2/1 151.00 85.002. FABULOUSCONNECTION PParchment 55.0 83/1 1 1/2 576.003. EUSEBIA RHalledeen 55.0 5/2 1 1/4 120.004. SINK THE BISMARCK LSteadman3 54.0 6/1 Sh.HeadWIN: $151.00PLACE: $85.00, $576.00, $120.00Final Time : 1:16.2 Splits : 23.3, 47.3Winner : 6yo b horse – SEEKING THE GLORY – RHYTHMICAL RAINTrainer : ANTHONY SMITH Owner : MERCURIALBred by CARL CHANG & PETER CHUCKQu: $6,763.00 Ex: $14,494.00D/E: $229.00Superfecta: $73,921.00Rolling Triple: $495.00Race 5 1400 M (Purse $530,000) NB4-Y-O & UP RESTRICTED ALLOWANCE V(NW2)LP AZAR PLAQUE*1. TURBO MACHINE CAT RLunan 56.02. SIR BIGGS CBudhai 56.0 1/2L 92.003. SCAR RMitchell 56.0 1 1/2L 93.004. MAN IN BLUE CChow 56.0 2 3/4LWIN: $91.00PLACE: $63.00, $92.00, $93.00Final Time : 1:29.0 Splits : 24.3, 48.1, 1:14.1,Winner : 4yo ch colt – DODGEM – SECRET CATTrainer : ANDERSON,CARL D Owner : CARL D ANDERSONBred by CARL D. ANDERSONQu: $221.00 Ex: $481.00D/E: $279.00Superfecta: $1,573.00Rolling Triple: $387.00MERCURY SPRINTRace 6 1000 M (S) (Purse $768,000) NB3-Y-O MAIDEN SPECIAL WEIGHT-(COLTS & GELDINGS)-DIV.I1. LITTLE BIG HORN OWalker 54.0*2. MEGATRON SEllis 56.0 2 3/4L3. PROUD PRESIDENT DaneNelson 54.0 2 1/4L4. SEEKING THE DAWN RMairs 54.0 1 3/4L5. BULLET RAJ RMitchell 53.0 1/2L6. BOLD SYMPHONY OFoster 56.0 1 3/4LWIN: $170.00PLACE: $71.00, $71.00, $116.00Final Time : 0:58.3 Splits : 22.3, 44.3Winner : 3yo b colt – WAR MARSHALL – LITTLE WASPTrainer : WAYNE DACOSTA Owner : ELIZABETH DACOSTA, WINSTON KONG & RAYMOND ROUSSEAUBred by E. DACOSTA, G. DULAL-WHITEWAY, W. KONG & RAYMOND ROUSSEQu: $143.00 Ex: $551.00D/E: $497.00Trifecta: $315.00Hit-6: $2,947.50Rolling Triple: $911.00Pick-4: $1,468.00Super-6: $1,172.40Race 7 1000 M (S) (Purse $590,000) 3-Y-O & UP CLM($450,0-$400,0)/NB5YO(NW4)SUPREME VENTURES LTD PLAQUE1. UNBREAKABLE AChatrie 54.02. FRANKENSTORM PFrancis 53.0 2L*3. RUNJOHNNY RUN JPatterson4 50.0 Sh.Head4. BRAVE PROSPECT KRobinson 54.0 2 3/4LLate scratch : #5 CONCUR, #10 SUNLIGHT EXPRESSWIN: $142.00PLACE: $74.00, $65.00, $65.00Final Time : 0:58.4 Splits : 22.4, 45.2Winner : 5yo ch colt – TRADITIONAL – ONEMOREFASHIONTrainer : NEIVE GRAHAM Owner : O’SHAUN CONNECTIONBred by HAM STABLES LTD.Qu: $559.00 Ex: $993.00D/E: $647.00Superfecta: $3,136.00Rolling Triple: $1,603.00MERCURY SPRINTRace 8 1000 M (S) (Purse $768,000) NB3-Y-O MAIDEN SPECIAL WEIGHT-(COLTS & GELDINGS)-DIV.II1. DR. BANNER OMullings 56.0*2. NOLAN HILL AChatrie 54.0 1 1/4L3. BUCK CALL JErwin 54.0 4 1/2L4. BIG AL WHenry 54.0 1 1/2L5. COPPERFIELD SMuir 56.0 NeckWIN: $189.00PLACE: $85.00, $64.00, $162.00Final Time : 0:59.1 Splits : 22.4, 45.4, ,Winner : 3yo b colt – BLUE PEPSI LODGE – DEJA VUTrainer : PHILIP FEANNY Owner : 2 PENYUBred by HAM STABLES LTD.Qu: $177.00 Ex: $458.00D/E: $1,238.00Trifecta: $3,536.00Hi-5: $12,383.50Rolling Triple: $6,294.00Race 9 1300 M (Purse $560,000) 3-Y-O & UP CLM($350,0-$300,0)/NB5YO(NW3)BG&LC PLAQUE1. DOC HOLIDAY DaneNelson 55.02. ROCKETEER RLahoe 53.0 3L*3. STORMING PFrancis 52.0 Head4. PERSIAN BELLE AChatrie 54.0 1 1/4LWIN: $197.00PLACE: $65.00, $75.00, $65.00Final Time : 1:21.0 Splits : 23.2, 47.0, 1:13.0,Winner : 6yo b horse – WIZARD OF GOLD – SI MI TRIALTrainer : ROBERT DARBY (SR) Owner : ROBERT A DARBY (SR)Bred by EDISON CHAIQu: $554.00 Ex: $1,421.00D/E: $1,003.00Superfecta: $4,254.00Rolling Triple: $4,441.00Race 10 1400 M (Purse $500,000) 4-Y-O & UP CLM($180,0)-NOT FINISHED 1st-2nd SINCE SEPT. 30B&D TRAWLING COMPANY LIMITED PLAQUE1. ALDEBARAN AGray4 53.0 *2/1 154.00 66.002. NO COINCIDENCE RHalledeen 55.0 2/1 3 1/4 73.003. GO TO HELL CChow 54.0 5/1 2 81.004. SMART BIDDER OMullings 57.0 66/1 1 1/25. SONGS OF FREEDOM RMitchell 54.0 60/1 NoseLate scratch : #16 I’VE BEEN CHOZENWIN: $154.00PLACE: $66.00, $73.00, $81.00Final Time : 1:30.0 Splits : 24.1, 48.1, 1:15.1,Winner : 7yo b horse – CRUCIAL TRIAL – SAM’S FOUNTAINTrainer : DENRICK CHAMBERSOwner : MICHAEL L FRANCISMRBred by KARL SAMUDAQu: $419.00 Ex: $733.00D/E: $918.00 (6-16) $165.00Trifecta: $903.00Hi-5 Carry-over : $53,631.50Rolling Triple: $2,907.00Pick-4 : (9-10-6-11) $12,260.00Super-6 : $27,226.60Pick-9: $199,088.00 (9 OF 9)PlacePot 8: $1,467.00 (8 OF 8)last_img read more


Football fans clash with church members over stadium plaza

first_imgCarpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title LATEST STORIES Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew In this photo provided by the Andina government news agency, Alianza Lima club soccer fans, left, fight with members of an evangelical church, yellow helmets at right, outside the soccer club’s stadium in Lima, Peru, Monday, Sept. 10, 2018. The two groups clashed outside the stadium over who has the right to use the area surrounding the sports venue, after the religious group arrived early in the morning and started removing the team’s logos from the parking area. (Norman Cordova/Andina News Agency via AP)LIMA, Peru — Football fans clashed with members of an evangelical church Monday in a dispute over who owns a sprawling plaza in front of the main entry to a stadium.Hundreds of members of The Upper Room church wearing yellow construction helmets arrived in buses early in the day and began painting walls, covering over images of famed players from Alianza Lima, one of Peru’s most historic clubs.ADVERTISEMENT Soccer fans soon arrived and the two sides clashed. Police used tear gas to break up the confrontation.Police Chief Gaston Rodriguez said two of the fans were detained and one of the church members was injured.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissThe club said in a news release that it has owned the plaza for 40 years. But church attorney Sandro Balbin said the church has been the registered owner of the property since 2016.The area is now used for concerts, parking and a gathering place for fans. The Upper Room, which has thousands of members across the country, wants to hold worship services there. MOST READ Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crowncenter_img Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Pacquiao to Arum: I’ll see you in court Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil View commentslast_img read more


Christmas ambush by David Granger

first_imgDear Editor,As Guyanese focused on the Christmas festivities, Retired Brigadier David Granger led an ambush on the nation’s psyche and resources. Ever since Bloomberg confirmed suspicions of unusual approaches made to selected international oil companies, there was an outcry by anti-corruption, pro-transparency persons, groups, and media outlets. At 22:30h (10:30 pm), Friday the 20th, David Granger announced that oil was flowing from the Liza 1 well-head and Guyana was an oil-producing country; Granger then decreed the 20th would henceforth be known as “National Petroleum Day”. It must be good to be the King; I know it’s terrible to be a ‘subject’.The Government informed the ‘subjects’ who were chosen to sell three million plus barrels of oil on our behalf on the 23rd, all the chastising, good advice and dire warnings were ignored and a known bad actor was engaged as our partner. The Christmas ambush did not end there, before the end of the day we learned of a compulsory acquisition order for over 123 acres, ostensibly, to facilitate the erection of a high-spam bridge over the Demerara River; no plan of the area to be utilised accompanied the order; no feasibility study was quoted for, none has been completed with regards to a high-span bridge. I can only presume the Gods of Gazettes and Acreage have again been at war with the Printer’s devil and have transformed twelve and three tenths (12.3) acres into an area well beyond what would ever possibly be required by way of the errant decimal point. However, this is APNU/AFC and there may be imaginary shopping malls at both ends of the bridge or even a small airport complete with roundabouts and runways designed by the APNU Ministry of Magic.Our day was not yet done, we had a tragi-comical statement from the Head of the Department of Energy, Dr Bynoe, who provided information that loans made to Guyana are not subject to our laws, but are in fact, available for use as the lender saw fit. I can understand this being the case with a grant that would not have to be repaid by our hard work and taxes, but a loan? I would advise Dr Bynoe to see legal counsel tout suite lest he ends up on long vacation up the Mazaruni River very soon.Editor, given the illogical moves to sell our share of profit oil not to the highest bidder, but to someone who will refine it, tell us how great it is and even sell it at their gas stations, I fully expect to see David Granger cutting a ribbon on a gas pump in Hoboken, New Jersey, early February, as the ‘first gallon’ of Liza grade gasoline hits the world market. Elections are on March 2; let us vote to see the back of Granger. No more rule by decree. Long live the Republic.Respectfully,Robin Singhlast_img read more


No. 1 seed Mt. SAC gets by Foothill

first_imgSeeded No. 1 in the South, Mt. SAC used an 18-10 run at the beginning of the second half to turn a close game into a 71-61 win over the North No. 4-seeded Owls at Fresno’s Selland Arena on Friday. “We definitely didn’t play one of our best games,” said Mt. SAC coach Laura Beeman, who had guided the Mounties to an average winning margin of 43 points per game since their only loss of the season on Jan. 12, but only won by 10 against a team they beat 63-46 earlier in the year. For the entire first half of its State Championship quarterfinal game against Foothill College, the Mt. San Antonio College women’s basketball team struggled. The second was another story – well, kind of. “We were just anxious. It definitely wasn’t one of our better games.” After leading just 33-28 coming out of halftime, Mt. SAC (35-1) began to distance itself in the second half. Freshman guard Jazlyn Davis had a game-high 23 points – 12 of which came in the first half – three rebounds and four steals for the Mounties. “We just wanted to come out and execute and play hard,” Davis said. “We came out a little flat today. But we picked up our defensive intensity. We didn’t want to go home today.” Sophomore guard Tonicia Tademy added 10 points and five steals for the Mounties, who had 11 steals and forced Foothill (27-9) into 28 turnovers. center_img Mt. SAC pulled down an astounding 25 offensive rebounds on its way to 45 total rebounds for the game. “We always crash the boards hard,” Beeman said. “It’s what’s kept us in the big games. “We led them in every statistical category but shooting percentage. We took 24 (72-48) more shots than they did, it gave us our advantage.” Sophomore guard Tay Hester was 10 of 12 from the free-throw line as she scored 18 points and had six rebounds. The win sets up a semifinals matchup today at 5 p.m. against College of the Canyons (30-5), which beat North No. 2 San Joaquin Delta earlier in the day. The Mounties beat the Cougars 71-57 in the championship game of their season-opening Mt. SAC tournament. “They have an All-State point guard who is tremendous,” Beeman said. “They transition very well. We need to make them slow it down and run their half-court sets.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more


CONFIRMED: Man United midfielder won’t return until next summer

first_img Nani Sporting Lisbon have ruled out a return to Old Trafford for on-loan Nani before the end of the season.According to Portuguese newspaper, A Bola, the winger, whose loan expires in June 2015, held a meeting to assess a possible return to Manchester United in the January transfer window.Sporting have stated that the player will continue until the end of the season and a spokesperson is quoted as saying: “He is totally convinced and focused on this project.” 1last_img


Sherwood insists he will NOT stand in Aston Villa striker’s way amid Liverpool rumours

first_img1 Christian Benteke in action for Aston Villa Aston Villa boss Tim Sherwood insists he will NOT stand in Christian Benteke’s way should the striker want a summer move away from Villa Park.The Belgian is likely to be a transfer target for big clubs in the coming months, with Liverpool the latest to be linked after his run of nine goals in eight games.Sherwood has no intention of selling the big Belgian but concedes if Benteke wanted to go and the money was right, he would be allowed to leave.He said: “I haven’t heard anything about that, but it’s good news that people are talking about Christian again because he’s scoring goals and if he’s scoring goals for us, we’re happy.“I’ve no idea what he’d cost, because I don’t want to sell him. It would have to be a lot of money for anyone to take him from us.“He’d be too expensive for a great deal of clubs in the Premier League. But we’re not looking to sell our assets and he’s certainly one of those.“If a player doesn’t want to play for the club anymore and the club he wants to go to meet the valuation then I think it’s always best to let them go.”The former Tottenham boss added: “It would be about the market value of what’s out there but I have no intention of selling Christian.“He’s enjoying his football and I saw some positive things said by his agent, saying he had not talked to other clubs or seen any interest from other clubs and that Aston Villa were playing the best football out of any team in the league. I think he was spot on there.”last_img read more


‘Do we want to play behind fences again?’ Ray Wilkins on FA Cup coin-throwing

first_imgRay Wilkins has warned football supporters they will all be punished for the offenses of the minority if fans don’t help the authorities stamp out the throwing of projectiles at matches.This weekend’s FA Cup action was marred but a number of coin throwing incidents.Chelsea have vowed to ban the ‘idiotic and dangerous’ fans responsible for throwing objects at Manchester City players as they celebrated scoring at Stamford Bridge on Sunday.Meanwhile, the Football Association have launched an investigation into the events which saw West Brom winger Chris Brunt hit with a coin thrown from a section of his own supporters against Reading.The Baggies star said he was “disgusted” and “ashamed” by the incident, and former player and coach Wilkins believes fans have the responsibility to turn offenders in.“This has got to stop, it’s just ridiculous,” Wilkins told the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast.“Do we want to start seeing football matches from behind fences or netting again? Because that’s where we’re heading.“These are extremely dangerous situations, especially the one with Chris Brunt. The coin hit him just below the eye so that could have been really serious.“I would also say that somewhere along the line, because it is a criminal offence, we’ve got to self-police our grounds as well. Even if CCTV didn’t pick it up, someone is that stadium knows who threw that coin.”last_img read more


England coach reveals the methods Hiddink used to turn around Chelsea’s season

first_img Guus Hiddink has guided Chelsea away from their early season troubles 2 England’s Grand Slam-winning coach Eddie Jones has revealed how interim Chelsea manager Guus Hiddink steered the Blues away from the foot of the Premier League table.Jones, who guided England to rugby union’s Six Nations title earlier this year, visited Chelsea’s Cobham training base last week to observe Hiddink and his staff’s methods, and gave an insight into the Dutchman’s work.“He inherited a team that obviously wasn’t performing well and there were some factions within the team,” Jones explained, in our sister publication, Sport magazine.“It was how he put that team back together and got them out of the relegation zone – got them playing a Chelsea style of football.“One of the things that resonated with me was that he didn’t go back to what had happened.“He concentrated on what they could do in the future, which was not dissimilar to what we tried to do with England.”SEE THE FULL ARTICLE IN SPORT MAGAZINE THIS WEEKLike Hiddink, Jones took over a struggling team, after England last autumn became the first host nation to fall at the World Cup pool stage. 2 The Australian rugby coach – who watched Chelsea lose 0-3 at home to Manchester City (pictured above) – drew parallels between Hiddink’s approach with Chelsea and his own methods with the England team.“We didn’t go back [to England’s rugby players] and say: ‘These things were wrong, these things were right,’” said Jones.“We just said: ‘This is your opportunity to change it. You’re either part of the problem or part of the solution. If you want to be part of the solution, you start working hard, you start playing for the team, you start understanding that you’ve got to be selfless.’”last_img read more


Lee Garners PFL Special Teams Player of the Week Honors

first_imgLee and the rest of the Bulldogs head to Dayton, Ohio on Saturday to take on the Dayton Flyers. Print Friendly Version Lee was responsible for 12 points in Drake’s 30-28 PFL victory against Morehead State, Saturday. He hit a field goal on three consecutive drives (28, 27 and 26 yards, respectively) to give Drake a 9-8 lead early in the second quarter. He then converted all three of his PATs as the Bulldogs extended the lead to 30-8. Lee also handled punting duties and averaged 43.2 yards on his six punts, Drake netting 40.0 yards on those kicks. He boomed his first punt 57 yards, saw two downed inside the 20-yard line and three were fair caught. Lee wasn’t through as he also kicked off six times, averaging 61.5 yards per kick, three going for touchbacks. SAINT LOUIS, Mo. – Drake football’s Josh Lee was named Pioneer Football League Special Teams Player of the Week, the league announced on Sunday, Sept. 25.last_img read more


Constitution Hill is a window on a brutal past

first_img“The Hill, as it is fondly known, is an engine of growth and transformation for downtown Johannesburg and a place where residents and visitors can interact in a space that takes the country’s history forward in a respectful but progressive manner,” explains Petal Thring, the chief executive officer of Constitution Hill. (Image: www.mediaclubsouthafrica.com) Melissa Jane Cook• Petal ThringCEOConstitution Hill+27 11 381 3100info@constitutionhill.org.za• ConHill is preferred heritage destination • Experts unpack meaning of human rights memorial • Gandhi’s memory lingers in South Africa• Values, heritage can be learnt here • ConCourt art tells South Africa’s storyConstitution Hill is home to the Constitutional Court, the foundation of all that is democratic in South Africa. It is a reminder to all who visit that dignity, democracy, freedom and equality are entrenched in the Constitution.For decades, South Africa was an international pariah, notorious for its apartheid policies. Today, Constitution Hill, in Braamfontein has undergone a phenomenal transformation, a microcosm of the changes the country as a whole has undergone. Once a place of inhumanity and brutality, it is now a place of justice and learning. A commanding presence, Constitution Hill overlooks Johannesburg and provides a unique perspective on the City of Gold and its rich history. This site is home to the Constitutional Court, Women’s Gaol museum, Number Four museum, and the Old Fort museum.“The Hill, as it is fondly known, is an engine of growth and transformation for downtown Johannesburg and a place where residents and visitors can interact in a space that takes the country’s history forward in a respectful but progressive manner,” explains Petal Thring, the chief executive officer of Constitution Hill.A living museumIt is a living legacy of a very complex, tumultuous past going back to 1892, when the Old Fort was built by the Zuid Afrikaanse Republiek (ZAR), under president Paul Kruger. It was built as a prison, but for a brief period during the South African War, or Anglo Boer War, of 1899 to 1902, it served as a military defence post.In the late 1800s and early 20th century, new buildings were added to the fort-like prison. These included the Natives’ Section and isolation cells known as sections Four and Five, where black male prisoners were held, a Women’s Goal in 1907, and an Awaiting Trial building in the 1920s.Collectively, these buildings were known as the Fort, infamous for its brutal treatment of prisoners. Common criminals and ordinary men and women who had contravened colonial and apartheid legislation were imprisoned here in abhorrent conditions.Old FortBefore it took on its role as apartheid prison, the Old Fort was used to defend the ZAR capital, Pretoria. Kruger’s soldiers walked its ramparts in the war, until the British marched into town in 1900, and took over the structure.The ramparts were built to protect the ZAR from British invasion, as well as intimidate migrant miners and keep an eye on them as they crowded into the village in search of gold. Reverting to a prison after the war, initially only white male prisoners were held here, except for Nelson Mandela, who, before the Rivonia Trial in 1962, was given a bed in the hospital section.It is a living legacy of a very complex, tumultuous past going back to 1892, when the Old Fort was built by the Zuid Afrikaanse Republiek (ZAR), under president Paul Kruger. It was built as a prison, but for a brief period during the South African War, or Anglo Boer War, of 1899 to 1902, it served as a military defence post. (Image: www.constitutionhill.org.za)Women’s JailThe Women’s Jail was a charming, Victorian brick building. A space of such grace, yet it humiliated and brutalised its female prisoners, which included criminals and murderers, as well as anti-apartheid activists. The infamous murderess Daisy de Melker was held here, as were prominent political stalwarts such as Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Albertina Sisulu and Fatima Meer. The women were particularly vulnerable. An information board in the museum today quotes political activist Barbara Hogan: “I could hear a doctor screaming at her saying, ‘You say your baby is sick, but if you cared about your baby, you would carry a pass.’”Number FourThe sign above the entrance to the Natives’ section, Number Four, is a quote from Mandela: “It is said that no one really knows a nation until one has been inside its jails.”Built to house 997 prisoners, it housed 2 200. Here, thousands of black men were imprisoned and brutalised; yet many survived and defied their jailors. Walking down a dark corridor on to a concrete courtyard on a drizzly, gloomy day gave a minute glimmer into what the prisoners must have felt when they arrived at the frightening Number Four. For many, this was their last journey. During the apartheid era, police would arrive numerous times a day with prisoners, who were given a prisoner number; this number was how they were identified.Detainees were strip-searched and hosed down, in summer or winter, and forced to perform the dehumanising “tausa”. This was a diabolical movement that allowed the prison warders to check whether the inmates were smuggling any weapons or contraband up their rectums. Political prisoner Indres Naidoo describes it: “When performing ‘tausa’ the naked person would leap in the air, spinning around and opening the legs wide while clapping his hands overhead and then in the same moment coming down, making clicking sounds with the mouth and bending his body forward so as to expose his open rectum to the warders’ inspection.”Bob Gosani, a photojournalist, secretly managed to photograph the “tausa” from the top floor of a nurses’ home overlooking the prison.Living conditions at Number Four were excruciating and barbaric. In the food area, where prisoners collected their food from trolleys before moving off to eat in the yard or cells, today food drums display the ghastly prisoners’ menus. African National Congress stalwart Joe Slovo describes the drums in his unfinished autobiography: “The first drum, marked ‘Congress One’, contained cooked chunks of beef or pork for white accused. The ‘Congress Two’ drum, for coloureds and Indian prisoners, contained either porridge or boiled vegetables on top of which floated a few pieces of fatty meat that were most probably from the discarded cut-offs from ‘Congress One’ drum. The ‘Congress Three’ drum (for black prisoners) was always meatless and the contents alternated between a plastic-textured porridge and a mixture of boiled mealies and beans.”There were only eight, eastern style toilets that offered no privacy and were in close proximity to the food area. Writer and political prisoner Alex La Guma wrote: “One of the reasons for my disease [typhoid] is found in this jail. Filth. The mats are filthy, the blankets are filthy, the latrines are filthy, the food is filthy, the utensils are filthy, and the convicts’ clothes are filthy. The latrines overflow and make a stench.”Showers were allowed once a week, but prisoners were often denied a wash for months. The allocated shower time was 30 minutes for the 2 000 prisoners, and the gang members took most of this time. The inmates would then be forced to use the toilet to wash their faces, or would rub soap on themselves and wait for it to rain.The communal cells housed between 60 and 70 prisoners; they were only built for 30 and as a result were overcrowded, dirty and badly ventilated. They were lit by a small window, but ironically, as authorities tried to break the spirit of the prisoners, these communal cells became an area to build courage and discuss resistance. The inmates gave each other strength and sang resistance songs to entertain, comfort and maintain solidarity.As if life inside was not harsh enough, made worse by the hostility of the prison wardens, there was also a hierarchy in the cells. You slept according to status: the gang leaders in the place of most comfort. The bod guards protected them and then the bush, or slaves, were near the toilet. It was a stinking space, where the slaves, the lowest in the cell food chain, were abused. These unsanitary conditions created perfect conditions for diseases, including typhoid and enteric fever.Emakhulukhuthu, an isiZulu word meaning the “deep dark hole”, was reserved for the harshest punishments. These were the isolation cells, where “lunatics, juveniles and those with infectious diseases” were kept. Prisoners here spent 23 hours a day inside, subsisting on a diet of rice water. “They could officially be held here for 30 days but some spent over a year in these cells,” states one of the information boards.Emakhulukhuthu, an isiZulu word meaning the “deep dark hole”, was reserved for the harshest punishments. These were the isolation cells, where “lunatics, juveniles and those with infectious diseases” were kept. (Image: www.constitutionhill.org.za) To pass the time, the inmates were creative and did blanket sculpting. At the end of each week, the prisoner with the most artistic blanket sculpture won a reward. “The conditions here were so depraved that when the prisoners were moved to Diepsloot Prison, known as Sun City, they said it was like moving to a hotel, and was utterly luxurious compared to the horrific conditions they had to previously endure,” said Thring.Number Four is now a stark museum and memorial to the thousands of men who were confined within its walls, deprived of the most rudimentary of human rights. Photographic, audio and video material captures the rich heritage of the site. Artefacts of prison life are also on display, including recreations of the blanket and soap sculptures. It remains as it was when it was closed in 1983.Jailed for fighting for freedomMahatma Gandhi was the first to apply the concept of non-violent civil disobedience in South Africa, against the racial segregation laws of the time. The exhibition in the Old Fort, “Gandhi: prisoner of conscience”, focuses on the years Gandhi spent in Johannesburg, from 1902 until 1914, when he left South Africa at the age of 46.Of his experiences in South Africa, he said: “Truly speaking, it was after I went to South Africa that I became what I am now. My love for South Africa and my concern for her problems are no less than for India.” Mandela is quoted on the walls of the exhibition: “The spirit of Gandhi may well be a key to human survival in the 21st century.”Mahatma Gandhi was the first to apply the concept of non-violent civil disobedience in South Africa, against the racial segregation laws of the time. The exhibition in the Old Fort, “Gandhi: prisoner of conscience”, focuses on the years Gandhi spent in Johannesburg, from 1902 until 1914, when he left South Africa at the age of 46. (Image: www.constitutionhill.org.za) Constitution Hill has witnessed it all: South Africa’s history of injustice, detention and imprisonment, as well as democracy at work. People who passed through the complex include Gandhi, Mandela, Albert Luthuli, Walter Sisulu, Joe Slovo, Ahmed Kathrada, Treason trialists of the late 1950s, and students and schoolchildren from the 1976 Soweto uprising, as well as thousands of others active in the apartheid struggle, alongside common criminals.This multipurpose complex functions as a national symbol of a new South Africa and a public space where South Africans, and others, can debate and define the democratic order and this new world.last_img read more