NYC Moves To Repeal Archaic Cabaret Law, Which Bans Dancing In Bars Without A License

first_imgOriginally passed in 1926, New York City’s Cabaret Law is an actively enforced ban on dancing and musical entertainment in any “room, place or space” that sells food or drinks unless those spaces obtain a special “cabaret” license. As a relic of Prohibition, the law first came into being as a means to police speakeasies, though now the long-standing Cabaret Law may finally be on the way out.The law has been controversial for years, though it has survived multiple attempts of repeal over the near-century that it’s been in place. However, Brooklyn city councilman Rafael Espinal hopes to change that, as he’s introduced a bill to finally repeal the Cabaret Law. The bill will be voted on Tuesday, though Espinal is confident he has the 26 voted need to pass it, telling the New York Times, “It’s over.”As a representative for Brooklyn, including Bushwick which contains a number of bars and D.I.Y. venues that host music regularly, Espinal argues that the law keeps bar and club owners “living in fear” and that it forces what could be safe gatherings underground and into potentially more-dangerous spaces. Currently, of the 25,000 establishments that sell food and drinks in the city, only 97 have a cabaret license. The low number is somewhat unsurprising, given that requiring a cabaret license costs time and money—in order to be approved, several agencies must approve a request and a venue must be zoned for commercial manufacturing.The history of enforcement of the Cabaret Law is spotty, with former Mayor Rudy Guiliani reviving the law in the 1990’s as a means to shut down dance clubs. In recent years, Mayor Bill de Blasio has cut back on enforcement of the law, and a spokesman for Mayor Bill de Blasio noted that “The mayor strongly supports repealing the law.” However, the spokesman also noted that mandatory security requirements for larger venues that were added to the law in the past 15 years, such as mandatory security cameras and certified security guards, still need to be honored and maintained.[H/T New York Times; Photo: Patrick Hughes]last_img read more


Dell EMC Adds AMD EPYC™ Processors to the World’s Bestselling Server

first_imgFor the second quarter in a row, we’ve sold more Dell EMC PowerEdge servers than any other vendor in the world*. This is a historic milestone for us and we’re excited that you’ve made PowerEdge servers such an integral part of your digital transformation.In May, Dell EMC announced the next generation of PowerEdge servers. Today, we’re excited to be working with AMD with the release of their new EPYC™ processor designed specifically for the enterprise space.Scalable Business ArchitectureAs you begin your digital transformation in cloud, mobility, IoT, virtualization, and software defined deployments, you face workloads that are radically different from those you faced just five years ago. As you invest in the future of your data center, you require a server architecture with exceptional ability to support modern workloads and scale to unpredictable demands. New Dell EMC PowerEdge servers provide flexible configurations to support these new workloads. With the high PCIe lane count (128 lanes) of the new AMD EPYC and its ability to support up to 24 NVMe devices out of a single processor, we now offer some truly unique server innovation in software defined storage and big data/data analytics at an outstanding TCO.Intelligent AutomationAs your IT environment becomes more complex, automation is now more of a necessity than a luxury. A recent CIO report revealed ‘skills gaps’ being more pronounced than ever in their employees, primarily due to a steep learning curve. They want to spend less time administering their hardware and more time with innovative programs that drive new revenue streams. Our goal is to develop a “self-driving” server” offering automated deployment, updating, monitoring, and maintenance. We call this “intelligent automation.”  New PowerEdge servers are intelligent enough to determine how they should be configured, how to recognize when something is wrong, and how to proactively get support. Furthermore, they are intelligent enough to protect the entire system from threats, detect and prevent potential security violations, and restore the server to a known trusted state.Integrated SecurityThreats to customer data have never been higher. Malicious exploits come not only from outside the IT infrastructure but through malware spreading from inside. Your security needs to be built directly into the DNA of the hardware to give you a deep foundation for a trusted environment. That’s why we’ve integrate security into every aspect of the server lifecycle. This includes patented security features that ensure your server is secure from the time we build it to configuration, operation, and ultimately decommissioning. AMD EPYC complements the integrated security in PowerEdge servers by including Boot-Safe and Run-Safe technologies for a heightened level of encryption in virtualized and cloud environmentsDell EMC welcomes AMD’s re-entry into the enterprise space by making the EPYC processor a part of our PowerEdge server technology. We’re excited to make this technology available to you in the second half of 2017.*IDC declares a statistical tie in the worldwide server market when there is a difference of one percent or less in the share of revenues or shipments among two or more vendors. Based on Units.  Data from IDC Quarterly Server Tracker, 2017Q1last_img read more


White eyes starting spot in final season

first_imgAndy Fate / The Badger HeraldFor almost his entire life, James White has never been the lead running back.When he was a three-star running back from Saint Thomas Aquinas High School in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., White was just an accent to his four-star teammate and UNC-commit Giovanni Bernard.When White arrived at Wisconsin, he was the speed to John Clay’s strength. He might have been the leading rusher, but he wasn’t the lead back.Montee Ball was the next man for White to supplement. Ball was the bratwurst. White was the beverage. Maybe Melvin Gordon was the finishing condiment. Once again, White was second in line. That all might start to change … maybe.In his last spring camp as a Badger, White has jumped up the depth chart, some would say by default, to the lead running back spot, as far as repetitions go. Finally.“James has done a good job this spring of establishing himself,” running backs coach Tom Hammock said. “He’s demanding his touches and he’s earning them. Every day he comes out to practice and earns more reps, so I’m looking forward to seeing how that develops once the season starts.”“Once the season starts” is off in the distance for White, some four and a half months before the Badgers take to Camp Randall for the regular season. It likely seems even further in the distance for the running back who has been in competition each of the last five or six years.The competition he shared with Ball didn’t leave as the clock expired on Ball’s illustrious career; it has actually probably heightened since the departure of the all-time touchdowns leader.Joining White in the Badgers’ backfield again is redshirt sophomore Melvin Gordon. The exciting jet-sweep specialist from 2012 excelled enough toward the end of the season to get many thinking White would once again be singing the second verses of the running back band.But while Gordon has been sidelined recently for Wisconsin’s practice, redshirt junior Jeff Lewis also threw his name into the mix, rushing for 74 yards on 16 carries during Saturday’s scrimmage, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. No matter where he seems to go, White tends to bring a competition with him.“I won’t say committee, but I’m going to let these guys fight for those carries,” Hammock said of his attempts to fill the void left by Ball, which may take all of three backs to satisfy. “If you want 20 carries, fight for them, and then go out there and earn it during the game.”It’s obvious that fighting for carries is nothing new to No. 20. What is likely new for him, however, is the leadership role he is now thrust into as the lone senior running back. Until this point, White always had an upperclassman leading the way. Now it’s his turn to lead.“We’re all competing out here, all the running backs. Everybody is fighting for that starting job,” White said. “I’m just trying to work hard and have a positive attitude out here and try to lead by example.”He sure did that during Saturday’s scrimmage. White did most of his damage on a pair of long runs in addition to a goal line touchdown carry. White said those carries are exactly how he likes to run; taking what his offensive line gives him and “wait for the long runs to come.”Those long runs are a big part of what White brings to the table as a running back. They are a big reason why he leads the nation in rushing among all returning running backs.While Ball had his days of explosiveness, White’s pedigree stems from finding seams and accelerating into the defensive backfield. It’s what Hammock enjoys seeing from him, too.“For the type of back that you are, you’ve got to make people miss,” Hammock said,  reciting what he tells White. “At the end of the day, when you’re in the open field, you’ve got to want it. That changes drives, that changes games, that changes seasons.”Having White lead the backfield also changes things a bit for redshirt sophomore fullback Derek Watt.Watt earned the starting fullback position in 2012 and will more than likely own the position again this season. He’ll be blocking for an entirely different lead back, however, regardless of whether White is the man or not.“[White] is a little more shifty – he can get outside and he can squeeze through little openings,” Watt said. “He’s a little different than Montee, not quite as big; he’s a lot smaller. But he’s got his own little way of doing things.”That might come from his upbringing, or at least Hammock would like to think so. His coach presumes that, if it comes White’s way, assuming the lead running back spot would be a product of how his parents raised him.“The one thing about James White is that he is the most solid, hard-working individual that I’ve been around,” Hammock said. “He’s going to come to work every day and not say two words.”“I call him the true professional because he knows what it takes.”last_img read more