Ministry converts Wisma Atlet Kemayoran into emergency COVID-19 hospital

first_imgThe Public Works and Public Housing Ministry is preparing to turn Wisma Atlet Kemayoran, a former athletes village in Central Jakarta, into an emergency hospital to treat people with COVID-19, according to an official.Wisma Atlet was used in the 2018 Asian Games, which was cohosted by Jakarta and Palembang, South Sumatra.  The sixth and seventh towers, each also providing 650 residential units with a capacity of 1,750 people, will house on-duty health workers and the COVID-19 Task Force, respectively.”We are seeking to complete the COVID-19 Emergency Hospital in the next four days,” the ministry’s housing procurement director general, Khalawi Abdul Hamid, said in a statement released on Thursday. “It’s expected to start operating on Monday.”COVID-19 was first detected in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, and has since spread to the rest of the world, including Indonesia, with confirmed cases mainly found in Jakarta. Out of the 309 confirmed cases nationwide, 210 are in the capital, according to the Health Ministry’s disease control and prevention director general, Achmad “Yuri” Yurianto.State-owned diversified manufacturer PT Rajawali Nusantara Indonesia, which also oversees imports of 500,000 rapid testing kits for COVID-19 from China, will be in charge of operations and maintenance of the Wisma Atlet emergency hospital.”[The use of] Wisma Atlet is still under further discussion,” Yuri, who also acts as the government’s spokesperson for COVID-19, told The Jakarta Post via text message on Thursday. (dfr) Four of its 10 towers will be converted to treat COVID-19 patients. Meanwhile, one tower, which consists of 650 residential units that can house 1,750 people, has been designated as an emergency hospital for hospice care. Another tower comprising 886 units and with a capacity of 2,458 people will support the emergency hospital, with the first floor allocated for emergency rooms, the second floor for intensive care units and the third floor for recovery rooms.The fourth to 24th floors are will used as regular hospice rooms. center_img Topics :last_img read more


Heisler: Jerry West coming home — almost

first_imgIf Lakerdom loved the idea of bringing Jerry West back to the team he played for so brilliantly and ran so expertly, he missed by about 50 feet, which is how far their dressing room is from the Clippers’ in the Staples Center hall.Who’d have thunk it?Not me. I wrote a lot of columns suggesting the wisdom of bringing West back before and after the Lakers fired Mitch Kupchak (oh yeah, and Jim Buss).As good a nuts-and-bolts GM as Kupchak was, it would have been good to have West’s cachet and daring in Mitch’s mentor. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error That’s one you have to give to owner Steve Ballmer, who has had little enough impact since paying $2 billion for the franchise, or as much as it cost for Magic and his people to buy the Dodgers, who came with a hilltop overlooking downtown and their own stadium.The No. 1 reason to bring in West as a consultant is: It can’t hurt.No one is sure what he was making in Golden State, but an insider guesses $1 million. Let’s say the Clippers have agreed to pay him $2 to $3 million. That’s chump change in an age in which teams get almost $90 million in national TV revenue to go with the huge local deals ($120 million for the Lakers, $50 million for the Clippers).For what it’s worth, the Lakers are no longer the fat cats in town. The Clippers charge more than they do for the courtside seats that Jack Nicholson, et al., sit in. With Ballmer’s 330 million shares of Microsoft, the company he co-founded, he has made $8.8 billion since Aug. 12, 2014 when he officially bought the Clippers.West didn’t rebuild the Warriors. If it was a team effort, the GM on the front lines every day was Bob Myers, another Southern California import from Arn Tellem’s agent shop.Nevertheless, West’s voice was heard, most clearly in the summer of 2014 when they considered trading Klay Thompson to Minnesota for Kevin Love.West opposed it. The Warriors withdrew. Love went to Cleveland for rookie Andrew Wiggins. Thompson and Steph Curry, the “Splash Brothers,” became the all-time 3-point shooting backcourt, combining to average 8.3 a game in the 2015-16 season. The team won two titles in a three-year run and blew a third after leading Cleveland, 3-1, in 2016.So what if the Clippers don’t need West as badly as the Lakers did? For whatever they need him for, they’ve got him.But no, the Clippers don’t need West as badly as the Lakers. Up until now, they’re been winning 50-plus games a season, going out in the first two rounds and getting zippo credit in what remains a Laker town, even coming off win totals of 27-21-17-26 points, a dynamic that will be hard to change.West’s greatest gift is the big picture. The Clippers’ big picture is already clear with the key performers — Chris Paul, Blake Griffin, DeAndre Jordan — in place.If team president Doc Rivers has been better as a coach than a personnel guy, his problem has been finding a small forward. Assuming we’re talking about a role player who shoots better, that’s not the reason you get a Jerry West who just turned 79 and isn’t signing up to beat the bushes.Of course, we may not be talking about a role player, but Carmelo Anthony, who looked like he was en route to L.A. at mid-season before Knicks owner James Dolan told Phil Jackson he didn’t want him traded.Until then, Phil looked desperate enough to rid himself of Melo that he was willing to take anything back, such as the package of Austin Rivers and Jamal Crawford, whom the Clippers were reportedly set to offer.Ignored as they are, the Clippers are actually fine with their cachet with Rivers, a favorite of players around the league, and CP3, whose esteem is reflected in his election to president of the Players Association. Paul is also close to Melo, which is probably why the Clippers are one of two teams he has said he would waive his no-trade clause for.However gracious Rivers sounds when he finally talks about West’s arrival, he can’t take it as a compliment. On the other hand, Doc is a grownup. Until we hear differently, we’ll assume he and Jerry will work it out.Unfortunately for the Clippers, they have the same problem everyone in the league does; The Warriors, or the last team that West helped build.The Clippers, with West, will likely be like they were before him, needing the next thing to a miracle to win a title and, failing that, eclipsed by the local team that wins half as many games.Nevertheless, as surely as dumber is bad, smarter is good. Whatever the Clippers were without West, they’re better with him.As for West’s former team, whatever the Lakers were without him, they still are.center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersThere was even more reason to bring him back after the arrival of Magic Johnson, who has enough cachet, but no front office experience along (oh yeah, and GM Rob Pelinka, a player agent with no more experience).I soon heard that the Lakers had no plans to hire West. It sounded like the same deal it had been with Jerry Buss, a devoted fan of West who nonetheless left him sitting around in retirement in Malibu before it occurred to the Warriors to tack him on as a consultant.Jerry Buss may have been thinking of protecting Jimbo’s place in the organization, or he may not have thought about it at all. The bottom line is, he never thought they needed West.Events will show whether Magic could have used West. Events have already shown that the fabulous Buss boys did with the Laker decline starting in 2011, the year West joined Golden State, marking the start of the Warriors’ ascent.No one imagined it would be the Clippers who brought West home. They’re in the process of doing just that, although they’re not saying much until it’s done.last_img read more


Lease with mall, first construction contract signed by Mason City’s mayor for River City Renaissance project

first_imgMASON CITY — Mason City’s mayor says the first steps of the River City Renaissance project are officially underway with the signing of the first construction contract as well as a lease with Southbridge Mall.The City Council last week approved a revised lease agreement with the mall owner. The lease agreement is for an initial 20-year term, followed by four subsequent five-year terms for a total of 40 years. The cost of the lease starts at $199,000 a year for the first five years, increasing by 10-percent each subsequent five-year period.Mayor Bill Schickel says the mall owner agreed to the council’s amendments, including that back taxes be paid prior to any lease payments being made. “You might remember that lease includes provisions that no money will be paid in terms of that lease until all of the taxes are current on the mall.”Schickel says the contract has been finalized with Dean Snyder Construction of Clear Lake dealing with the demolition of the interior of the former JC Penney store area where a multi-purpose center will be constructed. “I’ve signed a contract for the first construction bid. Construction should be getting underway shortly in JC Penney area where the multi-purpose center will be built.”Some concern was raised at last week’s council meeting that the city did not meet the minimum requirements for posting the notice as part of the bid letting process. Schickel says a review shows the city followed the necessary requirements. “You may have heard that there were some technical issues with the bidding process. We’ve consulted with the experts. We’ve consulted with our staff and legal counsel. They informed us that the statutes were indeed complied with, and various deadlines were met. So we’re excited to be moving forward.”The city is currently accepting bids for the second construction package for the arena, which includes the structural steel, concrete foundation and ice plant components of the facility. Bids are due on January 31st, with the council scheduled to approve a winning bidder at their February 5th meeting.last_img read more