3 arrested after search warrant served

first_imgJoseph MacVey, age 26, Sunman, Indiana1 count Dealing in Methamphetamine Level 2 Felony1 count Possession of Methamphetamine Level 4 Felony1 count Possession of a Narcotic Level 6 Felony2 counts Possession of a Syringe Level 6 Felony1 count Dealing in Marijuana A Misd1 count Possession of Marijuana B Misd1 count Visiting a Common Nuisance B Misd1 count Possession of Paraphernalia C Misd MILAN, Ind. –Early Tuesday morning, the Indiana State Police served a warrant in Milan, which resulted in drugs, paraphernalia, money, and weapons being seized, and three occupants of the residence being arrested on numerous charges, according to police.The Indiana State Police along with the Ripley County Sheriff’s Department responded to 106 Josephine Street, in Milan, to conduct a welfare check on a male that was possibly staying there.While at the home, police discovered enough information to apply for and receive a search warrant for the residence.Upon executing the search warrant, officers located suspected crystal methamphetamine, heroin, marijuana, syringes, and other drug paraphernalia.Officers also located a large amount of US currency as well as a firearm with an unreadable serial number.The three occupants were arrested and transported to the Ripley County Jail.There were also six children located inside the residence.Department of Child Services took custody of all of the children.The three were arrested on the following charges:Nathan Strickling, age 42, East Enterprise, Indiana1 count Dealing in Methamphetamine Level 2 Felony1 count Possession of Methamphetamine Level 4 Felony1 count Serious Violent Felon in Possession of Firearm Level 5 Felony1 count Possession of a Firearm without identifying marks Level 5 Felony1 count Identity Deception Level 6 Felony1 count Maintaining a Common Nuisance Level 6 Felony2 counts Possession of a Syringe Level 6 Felony1 count Dealing in Marijuana A Misd1 count Possession of Marijuana B Misd1 count Possession of Paraphernalia C Misd Tonya Stanley, age 29, Milan, Indiana1 count Dealing in Methamphetamine Level 2 Felony1 count Possession of Methamphetamine Level 4 Felony1 count Possession of a Narcotic Level 6 Felony2 counts Possession of a Syringe Level 6 Felony6 counts Neglect of Dependent Level 6 Felony1 count Maintaining a Common Nuisance Level 6 Felony1 count Dealing in Marijuana A Misd1 count Possession of Controlled Substance A Misd1 count Possession of Marijuana B Misd1 count Possession of Paraphernalia C Misdlast_img read more


Mike Scioscia, Ken Landreaux and several college all-stars elevate local wood bat league

first_imgPreviousThe OC Riptide’s Blake Evans waits on a pitch during a California Collegiate League game against the Santa Barbara Foresters during Wednesday’s game at Great Park in Irvine. Now in its 27th year, the CCL, which includes teams in Irvine, Pasadena, Thousand Oaks and Compton, offers players from all over the country MLB-caliber coaching and competitive playing experience in front of pro scouts. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The OC Riptide’s Devin Sutorius, left, celebrates with catcher Connor Aoki after finishing an inning during their California Collegiate League game against the Santa Barbara Foresters on Wednesday at Great Park in Irvine. Now in its 27th year, the CCL, which includes teams in Irvine, Pasadena, Thousand Oaks and Compton, offers players from all over the country MLB-caliber coaching and competitive playing experience in front of pro scouts. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The OC Riptide’s Carson Matthews, left, tags out Santa Barbara ForestersÕ Eric Kennedy trying to steal second base during a California Collegiate League game at Great Park in Irvine on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsThe OC Riptide’s Andre Antone prepares for his at bat during a California Collegiate League game against Santa Barbara Foresters at Great Park in Irvine on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The OC Riptide’s Blake Evans, right, rounds the bases during a California Collegiate League game against Santa Barbara Foresters at Great Park in Irvine on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The OC Riptide’s Devin Sutorius delivers a pitch during a California Collegiate League game against Santa Barbara Foresters at Great Park in Irvine on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The OC Riptide’s Connor Aube, right, celebrates with teammates after finishing up an inning during a California Collegiate League game Santa Barbara Foresters at Great Park in Irvine on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The OC Riptide’s Devin Sutorius, left, and Connor Aoki get ready for the game in a California Collegiate League game against Santa Barbara Foresters at Great Park in Irvine on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The OC Riptide’s Blake Evans takes a lead during a California Collegiate League game against Santa Barbara Foresters at Great Park in Irvine on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The OC Riptide’s Marrick Crouse, left, shares laugher with the dugout before a California Collegiate League game against Santa Barbara Foresters at Great Park in Irvine on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The OC Riptide’s Devin Sutorius, right, waves at the kids in attendance during a California Collegiate League game against Santa Barbara Foresters at Great Park in Irvine on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The OC Riptide’s Connor Aube checks his bat before a California Collegiate League game against Santa Barbara Foresters at Great Park in Irvine on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The OC Riptide’s Blake Evans waits on a pitch during a California Collegiate League game against the Santa Barbara Foresters during Wednesday’s game at Great Park in Irvine. Now in its 27th year, the CCL, which includes teams in Irvine, Pasadena, Thousand Oaks and Compton, offers players from all over the country MLB-caliber coaching and competitive playing experience in front of pro scouts. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The OC Riptide’s Devin Sutorius, left, celebrates with catcher Connor Aoki after finishing an inning during their California Collegiate League game against the Santa Barbara Foresters on Wednesday at Great Park in Irvine. Now in its 27th year, the CCL, which includes teams in Irvine, Pasadena, Thousand Oaks and Compton, offers players from all over the country MLB-caliber coaching and competitive playing experience in front of pro scouts. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)NextShow Caption1 of 12The OC Riptide’s Devin Sutorius, left, celebrates with catcher Connor Aoki after finishing an inning during their California Collegiate League game against the Santa Barbara Foresters on Wednesday at Great Park in Irvine. Now in its 27th year, the CCL, which includes teams in Irvine, Pasadena, Thousand Oaks and Compton, offers players from all over the country MLB-caliber coaching and competitive playing experience in front of pro scouts. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)ExpandThe first time Mike Scioscia laid eyes on C.J. Cron was not in 2014, when Cron debuted with the Angels, or when Cron signed his first professional contract after the 2011 draft, or even at a pre-draft workout. It was in Thousand Oaks in the summer of 2009, when the San Luis Obispo Blues played the Conejo Oaks.“You could see he could swing the bat,” Scioscia recalled Wednesday.These days, Scioscia stays clear of the dugout. That is Dave Soliz’s territory. But if you happen past Sparky Anderson Field on the campus of California Lutheran University in the early afternoon, you might find Scioscia between the lines doing what he loves: teaching young men the game of baseball.Hit up the Urban Youth Academy field in Compton and you will find Ken Landreaux, another member of the Dodgers’ 1981 championship team. He’ll be in the dugout. Landreaux is the manager of the Academy Barons, a rival of Scioscia’s Oaks in the California Collegiate League. If the initials CCL aren’t familiar to you, they should be.California’s oldest amateur wood-bat league fired up its 27th season this month. Its nine teams are comprised of college players from around the country. Some, such as Texas Tech pitcher Micah Dallas, haven’t had a chance to join their CCL teams yet because they’re still playing in the College World Series. The talent level is high, the tickets are cheap, and the seasons bridge a two-month gap in the baseball calendar when many college players retreat home for the summer.Still, you might wonder why two former major leaguers are toiling in relative anonymity, lending their time and talents to teams whose crowds number in the dozens on a good day.“It’s the level,” said Pat Burns, the CCL’s commissioner. “What we’re trying to do is get college all-star players. So if you’re a Division I college baseball player, you’re a very good, elite baseball player. … The fact that those players are hungry to train for a professional career, and we are that level that introduces wood bats and flat-seam baseballs, they’re treated well, the competition is solid day in and day out, they’re able to focus on their development – that is attractive to people who know the game like Mike Scioscia and Ken Landreaux.“The players are hungry to get better, and that’s fun to be around if you’re on the field coaching.” This is the thread that unites summer wood-bat leagues around the country. Burns estimates there are close to 40. Maybe you’ve heard of the Cape Cod League, a proving ground for future major leaguers whose history dates to 1885. If that’s the gold standard, the California League falls somewhere short of silver; how near it stands to the podium depends on who you ask. Some players will spend one summer in the CCL and the next in the Cape, or the Northwoods League, or the Alaska Baseball League.Take the example of the Fletcher brothers, David and Dominic. David, an infielder for the Angels, played in the Alaska Baseball League after his senior year at Cypress High. He played in the Cape Cod League after his freshman year at Loyola Marymount, then was drafted by the Angels as a sophomore.Dominic played for the CCL’s OC Riptide, which plays its home games at Great Park in Irvine, after his freshman year at the University of Arkansas. He played for Team USA after his sophomore year, then was selected by the Arizona Diamondbacks with the 75th overall pick in last week’s amateur draft.“He could’ve gone to play in the Cape,” David Fletcher said of his brother. “But he wanted to stay home, work on lifting and getting stronger.”Many of the CCL’s rosters are filled with locally born and raised players. That helps with attendance – a network of family and friends can make for a good crowd – but not every player wants to spend his summer at home. That’s why out-of-state players, such as Dallas, often find their way to the CCL.“I think it’s good to go out of state and play in summer ball,” Fletcher said. “It was good. It was my first time really away from home, the Alaska League, for like 2½ months. You play every day with wood bats. It gets you ready for pro ball a little bit.”Throw in the allure of competitive playing experience, MLB-caliber coaching, professional scouts in attendance, and a televised All-Star Game, and the CCL has plenty to offer a player.For Scioscia, Burns, and others involved with league operations, the challenges are many. Major League Baseball provides the league with a grant in the tens of thousands of dollars. In exchange for MLB’s support, the teams are run as registered nonprofits, with the fruits of their fundraising efforts poured back into everyday expenses.Travel is the big one. Charter buses transport players to and from San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Thousand Oaks, Pasadena, Compton and Irvine in the south. Four Northern California teams compete in their own division. A champion is crowned in August. The Conejo Oaks won the title last year.“We’re getting rings on Saturday,” Scioscia said. “It’ll be cool.”Scioscia, who lives in Thousand Oaks, said he’s been involved with his local CCL team for about 10 years. He was able to take a more active role late last year, after his final season managing the Angels. He was able to facilitate the hire of Soliz, the brother of former Angels bullpen coach Steve Soliz. Cody Ramer, who recently retired as a player after spending two years in the Angels’ system, is an assistant coach. Scioscia also recruited college pitcher Peyton Ebel, the nephew of Dino Ebel, the longtime Angel (and current Dodger) third base coach.In a crowded field of college summer leagues, the CCL must fight to stand out. It trails the gate receipts of the Northwoods League, with teams based in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan, whose crowds number in the thousands. It lacks the history of Cape Cod. The Oregon-based West Coast League features TrackMan devices in several of its ballparks – a valuable evaluation tool for scouts and coaches alike. The CCL parks, gleaming at a glance, do not.Yet the CCL does not lack for star power. It counts Cron, Fletcher and Kris Bryant among its alumni. Tyger Pederson, the brother of Dodgers outfielder Joc Pederson, managed the Riptide before graduating to a coaching position in the Cardinals’ organization. The league oozes with the passion of those yearning to move up in the baseball world, led by some who have reached the game’s highest peak.“That’s the bottom line: giving these kids the experience, the ability to improve,” Scioscia said. “Every opportunity we’ve had, we have kids out on the field at 1 o’clock doing early work – much like you would see in the minor leagues, even in the majors.”center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more


Lakers’ D’Angelo Russell already has Kobe Bryant’s trust

first_imgHONOLULU >> The restlessness overwhelmed D’Angelo Russell, prompting the Lakers rookie point guard to toss and turn before waking up at an ungodly hour before the first day of training camp. Russell could not wait for his workout, so he could break a sweat, build a rhythm and impress an influential and demanding teammate. But Kobe Bryant already beat him to the punch. The Lakers’ star already completed his own before anyone else. “He’s going to push you. So you have to be one of those guys that will compete,” Russell said. “To build a trust with a guy like that, you need to be a winner.” Russell also acknowledged feeling starstruck when he completed a three-man weave drill during his first training camp practice with Bryant. “You try to keep it off your mind that this guy is right beside you,” Russell said of Bryant. “That’s something you have to get past. If you want to be the best, we have to look at him as a mentor and not look at him as a fan.”Russell acknowledged that dynamic could “definitely” make him feel more tentative playing with Bryant, knowing both his star power and thirst to score. “He told me he likes to shoot the ball so if I get it to him, it’s his job to finish it,” Russell said in obvious understatement. “Just knowing where he likes the ball and where he likes to score from, being the point guard, you’ll get a bigger challenge off the bat.” But the Lakers argue Russell will handle that challenge just fine. One, Scott, Bryant and Julius Randle have praised Russell’s on-court poise. So much that Scott likened it to Clippers guard Chris Paul, the eight-time NBA All-Star whom Scott coached in New Orleans from 2004 to 2009. Russell maintained the same stoic demeanor during portions of Wednesday’s full-court scrimmage when he made pinpoint passes as he did when Lakers forward Nick Young talked trash after scoring on him. “Nick always talks,” Scott said. “D’Angelo is a very low-key guy. You don’t see him get too hyped up about things. He’s pretty much on an even keel.”Two, Scott has instructed Russell, Bryant, Randle and Jordan Clarkson to maximize fast-break opportunities by assuming ball-handling duties after rebounding the ball. In a few minutes of Wednesday’s half-four scrimmage that was open to reporters, Bryant played at small forward and neither touched nor shot the ball once. “I don’t think it matters man. You play the flow of the game and see what comes,” Bryant said. “I don’t have to handle the ball at all. That leaves more time to catch and shoot. With D’Angelo and Jordan, these guys can handle the ball, make incredible decisions and make plays. It makes it a lot easier.”Third, Bryant circled back on Russell’s quest for self-improvement. Russell asked for the Lakers to place his locker next to Bryant so he could easily ask him questions. Russell has already asked Bryant for tips to maximize his NBA longevity. And Russell has emulated Bryant’s approach on arriving to the gym early.Does that make Bryant feel more inclined to want to help Russell?“Absolutely,” Bryant said. “When guys have that same passion and desire for it, it makes you more willing to open up. When they’re here early and shooting late, you can tell when that passion is there and you can tell when they think it’s a job.”That explains why Bryant has saddled up to Russell after each practice. They talk. They laugh. They embrace. The makings of a potentially fruitful partnership has just started. The Lakers completed two days of training camp at Stan Sheriff Center, too small of a sample size to offer any conclusions on whether Russell will fit that description for the 2015-16 NBA season. Yet, the Lakers feel convinced their No. 2 pick is a winner after falling in love with his confidence and playmaking. Bryant also already likes what he sees. “He has my trust already because he’s a gym rat,” Bryant said. “He loves playing the game. I trust that whatever challenges are presented to him, he’ll figure them out.”There could be plenty. After averaging only 11.8 points on 37.7 percent, 3.5 turnovers and 3.5 assists in summer league play, Russell has to prove he can translate his outside shooting and playmaking to the NBA. He has admitted a learning curve in Byron Scott’s Princeton-based offense. center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more


Giannis Antetokounmpo thanked for putting Khris Middleton on ‘Sports Illustrated’ cover

first_imgGiannis Antetokounmpo was surprised to learn he is on the cover of the April 8, 2019 issue of “Sports Illustrated,” when he found out from an unlikely source.Bucks teammate Khris Middleton broke the news by thanking him, because Middleton is featured in the background of the cover photo. “I just found out from Khris. … he’s in the background,” Antetokounmpo told reporters Wednesday. “(Khris) walked in and he said, ‘Thank you for putting me on the Sports Illustrated cover.’ … I was like, ‘What are you talking about?’ He said, ‘You’re on the cover.'”I said, ‘OK, good to know, I didn’t know that.’ … He was happy to be in the background. I was like, ‘Yeah, I got you, bro.'”The SI cover features Antetokounmpo getting ready to posterize a trio of Spurs with a dunk as Middleton looks on in admiration (possibly thinking, “Take cover!)How the @Bucks turned the Greek Freak into the MVP, by @SI_ChrisBallard https://t.co/sNaOsEyh62 pic.twitter.com/B9kBaW3NMo— The Crossover (@TheCrossover) April 3, 2019The cover story, entitled, “Giannis: How to coach a unicorn,” follows first-year Bucks coach Mike Budenholzer’s quest on how to utilize the multi-dimensional Antetokounmpo. Ironically, Budenholzer told Middleton he would have to trim his accustomed role as a shot creator to accommodate Antetokounmpo’s game.“He told me he wanted me to take on a bit of a lesser role, be a team player and not rely on so many tough shots,” Middleton told SI. “And when a coach tells you that the first time you’re meeting them, I feel like you can’t do nothing but respect that.” “Instead of B.S.-ing me and telling me everything I want to hear, which a lot of people tend to do, I’d rather hear the straight truth, whether it’s good or bad.”Whatever they’re doing in Milwaukee, it’s working. The Bucks have an NBA-best 58-20 record. Antetokounmpo is averaging 27.4 points and 12.5 rebound per game and Middleton (18.1 ppg) made his first All-Star game this year.last_img read more


Green Deals Ryobi 9inch 24V Cordless Edger 99 Reg 149 more

Home Depot offers the Ryobi 9-inch 24V Cordless Edger for $99 shipped. Regularly $149, today’s deal is $10 less than our previous mention from earlier in 2018 and a new all-time low. This model is perfect for cleaning up sidewalks and other lawn-adjacent areas. It ships with a 24V battery plus a three-year warranty. Best of all? No gas or oil to deal with. Rated 3.8/5 stars by 200 Home Depot reviewers. more…The post Green Deals: Ryobi 9-inch 24V Cordless Edger $99 (Reg. $149), more appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forward read more