SIT Receives $50,000 Anonymous Gift for Scholarship for Women

first_imgSIT Receives $50,000 Anonymous Gift for Scholarship for WomenScholarship Honors Dr. Karen BlanchardBRATTLEBORO — An anonymous donor recently gave $50,000 to the School for International Training (SIT) to endow a new scholarship in honor of SIT Associate Professor Karen Blanchard. The Karen Stromgren Blanchard Scholarship for Women is designated for women who wish to undertake graduate or professional development work in SITs intercultural leadership program. The school offers a broad array of studies in nonprofit leadership and management, ranging from sustainable development to conflict transformation and international education.Blanchard, who earned her Ph.D. at the California Institute of Integral Studies, has taught at SIT since 1988. “It’s a very kind, sweet, humbling gift,” said Blanchard, “and it will be a great help to deserving women who want to participate in our programs.” Blanchard, who will be involved in the selection of scholarship recipients, said that women following in the footsteps of recent Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai will be top candidates. Maathai, an environmentalist and advocate for social change, is also a trustee of World Learning, SIT’s parent organization. Long before Wangari received the Nobel Prize, she was a grassroots activist who believed that change was possible, Blanchard said.”This gift is a wonderful testament to the impact Karen Blanchard is making on so many students who come to SIT for the unique education the school provides,” said Carol Bellamy, former director of UNICEF and new president of World Learning and SIT. “The generosity of this anonymous donor guarantees that Karen’s commitment to making a difference in the world will be realized for many years to come.For more information contact Ellen A. Holmes, VP for Development, at 802/258-3139 or email [email protected](link sends e-mail).Note: A digital photo to go with this press release can be requested from [email protected](link sends e-mail).- 30 –last_img read more


Family First launches High Court appeal against being stripped of charitable status

first_imgStuff co.nz 26 September 2017Family First Comment: Hold your horses, Charities Board!Controversial conservative lobby group Family First is appealing against being stripped of its charitable status by the Charities Registration Board.The board’s decision was made public in August. It was the second time it had tried to deregister the group.“Family First will appeal this decision as far as we need to because of the threat it places on us and other charities and their freedom to speak and advocate on behalf of their supporters in a civil society,” national director Bob McCoskrie said in a statement on Tuesday.The group has lodged an appeal in the High Court at Wellington to fight the deregistration.McCoskrie said the group had also successfully applied for an order that the board be restrained from deregistering the group until the appeal was heard.The board can direct charities to be removed from its register when they do not advance a charitable purpose for the public benefit and it is in the public interest to remove them.The group promotes traditional family values, is anti-abortion and considers marriage to be only between a man and a woman.“The board considers that Family First has a purpose to promote its own particular views about marriage and the traditional family that cannot be determined to be for the public benefit in a way previously accepted as charitable,” a statement from the board last month read.In 2013, the board made the decision to remove the group from the Charities Register because it did not advance exclusively charitable purposes.Family First appealed against that decision to the High Court.In June 2015, the High Court directed the board to reconsider its decision in light of the 2014 Supreme Court Greenpeace judgment and its own judgment.https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/97276959/family-first-launches-high-court-appeal-against-being-stripped-of-charitable-statuslast_img read more