Governor Wolf Announces COE Distributing to Expand, Moving Operations from Out of State to Fayette County

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter August 10, 2017 Economy,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced COE Distributing (COE), a wholesale distributor of office furniture and accessories, will expand its footprint in Fayette County and consolidate operations from outside the commonwealth to its site in Smock, creating 20 new, full-time jobs.“Seeing a family-owned company, which has been in Fayette County since 1940, choose Pennsylvania to invest in their future means that we have the location, infrastructure, and pro-business climate for companies to grow,” said Governor Wolf. “Additionally, bringing outsourced jobs to Pennsylvania where they belong is a huge win not just for COE, but for the people of Fayette County.”COE currently leases 127,000 square feet of warehouse space at the Franklin Commercial Park in Smock, PA, and an additional 60,000 square feet in Uniontown. A 138,000 square-foot expansion is planned at Franklin Commercial Park for COE to consolidate the Uniontown facility and bring operations currently being outsourced to a company in Maryland in-house to the expanded facility. The expansion will allow COE to take on new business and improve operational efficiencies. COE has committed to investing at least $10 million into the project, and additionally committed to creating 20 new, full-time jobs and retaining 43 more positions statewide.“COE Distributing is extremely excited and grateful to work with the Governor’s Action Team on our expansion project,” said J.D. Ewing, president and CEO of COE Distributing. “Securing the ability to expand at Franklin Commercial Park will allow us to confidently proceed with our aggressive growth plan and assure our operations will move forward uninterrupted. This would not be possible without the help of the Governor’s Action Team.”COE received a funding proposal from the Department of Community and Economic Development for a $40,000 Pennsylvania First grant and a $9,000 WEDnet grant for job training. The company has also been encouraged to apply for a $375,000 low-interest loan from the Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority.The project was coordinated by the Governor’s Action Team, an experienced group of economic development professionals who report directly to the governor and work with businesses that are considering locating or expanding in Pennsylvania, in collaboration with the Fay-Penn Economic Development Council.“COE is a great success story for our Fayette County economy,” said Bob Shark, executive director at Fay-Penn. “J.D. Ewing has worked diligently to create a world-class company that provides a significant number of great jobs and generates investment here. I know of the effort he expended to launch this expansion, and I’m thrilled that we could partner with the Governor’s Action Team and provide some funding to support it.”COE is a family-owned, third-generation company, operating in Fayette County since the 1940’s. COE specializes in wholesale distribution of office furniture and accessories and deals with key manufacturers such as OfficeSource, FireKing, HPFI, Flexsteel, LA-Z-BOY, VIRCO, and Linea Italia. The company has authorized dealers in 48 states and an extensive web-order business, allowing COE to sell globally.For more information about the Governor’s Action Team or DCED, visit dced.pa.gov.center_img Governor Wolf Announces COE Distributing to Expand, Moving Operations from Out of State to Fayette Countylast_img read more


Tough hill to climb for Trojan basketball

first_imgThey happened five months and more than 6,000 miles apart.First, there was the late March press conference at the Galen Center in Los Angeles where first-team All-Pac-10 center Nikola Vucevic declared he was skipping his senior season at USC to enter the NBA draft.Just last week, in a nondescript gymnasium outside Sao Paulo, star senior guard Jio Fontan landed awkwardly after being hit on a drive to the basket late in the first half of USC’s preseason game against a Brazilian professional team, tearing a ligament in his left knee and ending his season before it started.USC’s 2011-2012 basketball season doesn’t tip off until mid-November, yet its two defining moments have already taken place.The Trojans record is still unblemished at 0-0, but it feels like they’ve already lost so much.Now, let’s spare the doom and gloom and refrain from calling this a lost season for USC basketball.It is still only August and the Trojans have some intriguing young talent.USC’s group of freshmen and transfers could end up gelling very well together.A return trip to the NCAA tournament isn’t out of the question.The season that will be, however, is overshadowed by what could have been.With Vucevic and Fontan in the lineup alongside guard Maurice Jones, the Trojans would have returned their top three scorers from a season ago.Instead, USC now only boasts two players on its roster that scored in a game for the Trojans last year — Jones and sophomore forward Garrett Jackson.Newcomers Aaron Fuller and Dewayne Dedmon would have been expected to fill their roles solidly, not spectacularly.Now, they will be counted on to shoulder a good portion of the offensive load.The leftover effects of the O.J. Mayo scandal won’t help the team cope with the losses of Vucevic and Fontan, either.“Right now, this third year, especially with Jio getting hurt, that’s when you get hit with the remnant of these sanctions where we lost two recruiting classes,” USC coach Kevin O’Neill said. “We have a bunch of inexperienced guys that have never played. They’re going to get a lot of experience early and hopefully they respond well and turn themselves into a really good postseason team.”This could have been a banner season for recently rejuvenated USC basketball.After making only six NCAA tournament appearances from 1962 to 2000, the Trojans have qualified six times in the last 11 seasons.USC’s runs to the Elite Eight in 2001 and the Sweet 16 in 2007 marked the first time the program had made it past the second round of the Big Dance since 1954.“Our only goal is to make the NCAA tournament and try to win the Pac-12 title,” O’Neill said. “Those are our goals and I don’t think we should change those goals.”Fontan’s injury was an especially cruel blow to the Trojans, with his teammates forced to watch their leader stretchered off the floor.“In my career, I’ve never felt worse for a player than I feel for him,” O’Neill said. “The first two and a half games [of the Brazil trip], he was playing at a first-round-NBA-draft-pick level. I feel bad for him that way and bad for our team that he can’t be there to lead us and do all the things that a guy of his caliber would do.”Freshman Alexis Moore, from Long Beach Poly High, will be tasked with stepping into Fontan’s spot in the starting lineup.“He’s going to have to be a guy that doesn’t play like a freshman,” O’Neill said. “And even then, it’s going to be very difficult for a guy his age to step into his role that requires a ton of leadership, especially for what is a very young and inexperienced team now.”The schedule will do the Trojans no favors, either.With non-conference games against Kansas, San Diego State and Georgia, a potential tournament date with North Carolina in Las Vegas and a challenging Pac-12 slate, USC’s young players will be tested early and often.This season, however, will not make or break USC basketball.The gains the Trojans have made over the last decade have been substantial. The program weathered the storm of NCAA sanctions while enjoying its greatest run of success in recent history.The future remains bright for the Trojans — a talented and youthful roster, an experienced head coach and a recruiting foothold in the Southern California basketball market are all long-term assets.The short term gains of the 2011-2012 year, however, don’t look nearly as promising as how they were projected six months ago. “Sellin’ the Sizzle” runs Wednesdays. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or email Jonathan at [email protected]last_img read more


Photos: Beauty and fun of Accra Milo Marathon

first_imgThe 2016 edition of the annual Accra Milo Marathon this week crowned Corporal Alhaji Kassim Yakuub in the male adult category race and Ms Elizabeth Azure from the Upper East Region winning the female category award.The Marathon saw the participation of over 10,000 athletes competing in three different categories; 42.2km race for adults, 15km race for U-15 school children and 5km fun run for the family.Being a major event on the sporting calendar in Ghana for nearly three decades, the Accra Milo marathon has become the choice for both professional and amateur athletes to shape their career for international competitions.The colorful and biggest athletic event has a wonderful display of chorography by school children was put up as part of the closing ceremony.Speaking at the closing ceremony, the Managing Director of Nestlé Ghana, Freda Duplan said, “Nestle will continue to inspire the youths to get into sports. We believe sport has a unique ability to help instill life values such as hard work, responsibility, fair play, discipline, perseverance and team spirit in them.”                                       last_img read more


Cleary built for Origin: Fittler

first_imgSpeaking to media at a NSW Rugby League pathways program for up-and-coming playmakers, Fittler was hopeful the emerging generation of Blues playmakers would be able to arrest the dominance their Maroons counterparts have exerted in that position over the past decade.While Cleary was absent from the day due to club duties, Fittler also had high praise for Wests Tigers duo Luke Brooks and Mitch Moses, who took part in the session.”Nathan Cleary, he’s the one who actually looks like he handles pressure better than anyone,” Fittler said.”The thing with State of Origin, it’s intense and the whole thing is dealing with pressure. You’ve got to look also at your life off the field as well when you want to start dealing with pressure under that sort of magnitude. He’s a great example of someone who’s shown real signs of someone who should play Origin.”Origin, the centrepiece of the Australian rugby league calendar, was never won by the same state more than three years running until the past decade, in which Queensland have won nine of 10 series.Through that period, NSW have been their equals in the forwards and outside backs on almost every occasion but the gulf between the playmakers has been the difference.Fittler said much of that came down to the fact Queensland – who have had the likes of Darren Lockyer, Johnathan Thurston, Cooper Cronk and Cameron Smith – have boasted the best players in the country in those positions. However with the next best playmakers in the country often hailing from north of the Tweed (in recent years names like Daly Cherry-Evans, Michael Morgan and Ben Hunt have played for Australia) there have been questions around why the Blues haven’t been producing the same calibre of halves.”[Queensland’s] halves have been the best players in the game for a long time. You don’t have to be Einstein to realise that the basis of their team have been our best players,” Fittler said.”We need to put pressure on ourselves on and off the field to be the best players in the NRL competition. That will then show in State of Origin on the bigger stage under pressure.”We need pressure from underneath. If we’ve got all our halves playing good then it’s going to put pressure on the players who were there last time and the incumbents. That is the key, the key is to make all our players good from under and that just puts the quality up.”Fittler refused to speculate on who Blues coach Laurie Daley should or would pick in those positions in 2017 but was adamant that if Cleary was good enough then he’s old enough, while he also backed the two Tigers as capable of making the step up to Origin.”Everyone here at the moment [at the pathways event] we see as showing the habits of someone we want to play State of Origin or will be at the future at some stage,” Fittler said.”[Brooks and Moses] have stepped up at a young age into first grade, they’ve copped a lot so they can share some great experiences about the pitfalls and the goods and the bads of playing rugby league.”They’ve been playing first grade footy since they were 18 or 19 years old so I’ve got no doubt that they should be putting pressure on the players that are there at the moment.”Fittler said the event – which also included tutelage from fellow Blues greats Andrew Johns, Danny Buderus, Anthony Minichiello, Mark O’Meley and Paul Sironen – was “a good opportunity”.”This is part of our pathways program so we’ve seen all these kids come through whether it’s in Harold Matthews, SG Ball, there’s a young fella who’s as young as 14,” Fittler said.”We phoned up Mitchell Moses and Luke Brooks and some of the first graders (such as Cameron McInnes and Connor Watson) and they were only too happy to come down and hopefully they can share also some of their experience because that’s the big thing is taking that next step.”We’re not just dealing with things on the field but off the field as well and just giving them a bit of balance and hopefully giving them some skills to deal with everything that comes along.”last_img read more