Arsenal legend Lauren reveals he would repeat infamous Ruud Van Nistelrooy incident ‘every year’

first_img Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 1 Apr 2020 2:38 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link541Shares Comment Advertisement Keown and other Arsenal players confronted Van Nistelrooy after the miss (Picture: Getty Images)Arsenal hero Lauren has revisited the time the Gunners’ players confronted Manchester United striker Ruud van Nistelrooy after his infamous penalty miss in 2003 and defended their actions, saying he would do it again.The feisty match during Arsenal’s famous Invincibles season was dubbed ‘The Battle of Old Trafford’ and despite finishing 0-0 was one of the spectacles of the season.Arsene Wenger’s side were furious as they believed Van Nistelrooy feigned contact to get Patrick Vieira sent off for a second bookable offence.In the final minute of the game, United were awarded a penalty, and after the Dutch striker smashed his strike against the bar, several Arsenal players – led by Martin Keown – surrounded the Red Devils player as a fracas ensued.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTDespite right-back Lauren being suspended for four games and fined £40,000, he admitted he would do it all again, telling the Handbrake Off podcast: ‘People have asked me many times, “Would you do that again?”. I always say 120 per cent I will do it. ‘I don’t mind about the ban, the £40,000 fine. I don’t care, as long as I protect the people I care for, the people I share the dressing room with, the people I love.Read the latest updates: Coronavirus news live Arsenal legend Lauren reveals he would repeat infamous Ruud Van Nistelrooy incident ‘every year’ Lauren was a key part of the Invincibles team (Picture: Getty Images)‘Because I always said when I came to Arsenal, I feel like they are my family. We had a very great batch of people.‘It’s not only about the quality, because we had quality in players like Dennis Bergkamp, Thierry Henry, a lot of great, great players, Kanu, but it was something like a bond.‘We cared about each other on the pitch and outside of the pitch so I can consider Arsenal as my family, so therefore I will do whatever is necessary to protect my family.‘In this case against United away from home, I think I would do it every single year if it’s necessary.’More: Manchester United FCRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseEx-Man Utd coach blasts Ed Woodward for two key transfer errorsIn the aftermath, Arsenal were charged by the FA with ‘failing to ensure the proper behaviour of their players’ and fined £175,000.Lauren, Martin Keown, Patrick Vieira and Ray Parlour were all suspended for between one and four matches for their involvement.MORE: Arsenal target Dejan Lovren gets green light from Jurgen Klopp to make transferMORE: Arsenal defender William Saliba compared to Raphael Varane by his former coachFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Advertisementlast_img read more


Limits on pesticides mean higher costs

first_imgFRESNO – State regulators proposed new rules Friday to meet a court-ordered deadline for cutting air pollution from chemicals used to kill pests, weeds and diseases in some of the nation’s most productive farmland. The proposed rules make California the first state to dictate how and where several widely used fumigants can be applied on fields statewide, said Glenn Brank, spokesman for the state Department of Pesticide Regulation. The restrictions would require any grower who uses fumigants to hire licensed people to inject them at a cost of as much as $40 million a year. The use of certain chemicals would be capped in areas in Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley with especially dirty air. The directive, which the agency has the authority to set, centers on fumigants – gases that fruit and vegetable growers use to kill pests in the soil before planting. The chemicals have long been blamed for being part of the state’s air-pollution problem because they cause smog-forming gases when they evaporate from fields. In 1997, the state pesticide agency promised to adopt a plan for reducing fumigant emissions by 20 percent. The target went unmet, however, and several environmental groups sued in 2004, claiming the state violated national health standards for smog. Ruling in that case last year, a U.S. District Court judge in Sacramento made the voluntary reduction goal mandatory. The state has appealed the court order, but the regulations will go through with or without an appeal, Brank said. If they take effect as proposed, the required changes in their operations would cost growers $10 million to $40 million a year, making it the most costly pesticide regulation in state history, Brank said. The rules would hurt some growers more than others because some rely more heavily on fumigants. The additional costs could force the state’s strawberry growers – who provide about 88 percent of the nation’s strawberries – to take one-third of their land out of production, said Mary DeGroat, a spokeswoman for the 700-member California Strawberry Commission. “Air, water, soil – that’s our livelihood,” DeGroat said. “We’ve been trying our best to be responsible while still trying to make a living.” Many carrot, tomato and grape farmers also use the chemicals and would face high costs. Environmental groups objected Friday to a provision that would let chemical manufacturers monitor what they are supplying to the three restricted regions and allow the head of the state pesticide agency to let growers reduce emissions by methods besides the ones stipulated in the proposed rules, he said.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Other industries, such as oil refineries, automakers and paint manufacturers, have limits on smog-making gases called volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, but this is the first time across-the-board limits were set for fumigant emissions, Brank said. The new rules would require farmers using fumigants to hire special commercial applicators and to incorporate low-emission techniques such as injecting the gases deeper into moist soil and covering fields with heavier tarps. The restrictions would also set caps on how much of the chemicals can be applied in the San Joaquin Valley, Ventura County and the Mojave Desert area – three of the growing regions with the worst air pollution. Nearly 36 million pounds of seven fumigants were used on California farms in 2005, according to the state. If adopted, the new regulations would reduce pesticide emissions by 30 percent to 40 percent, regulators said. They were immediately met with criticism both from growers, who said implementing them would cost them millions, and environmentalists, who said the rules are too lax. last_img read more