Betancourt’s Jailer Pleads Not Guilty on Drug-Trafficking Charges in the U.S.

first_imgBy Dialogo July 20, 2009 Washington, July 17 (EFE).- Today FARC guerrilla Gerardo Antonio Aguilar Ramírez, alias “Cesar,” one of the “jailers” of Ingrid Betancourt and three Americans rescued in July 2008, pleaded “not guilty” to the drug-trafficking charges of which he is accused in the United States. “Cesar,” who was extradited from Bogotá yesterday, appeared before a federal judge in Washington in a hearing attended by Marc Gonsalves, one of the three Americans who were kidnapped in the Colombian jungle for five years. Through his lawyer, Carmen Hernández, the guerrilla pled “not guilty” to the drug-trafficking and money-laundering charges of which he is accused in the United States, while the lawyer recalled that in this case her client is being judged “in a drug-trafficking case, not a kidnapping case.” Nevertheless, prosecutor Eric Snyder pointed out that Marc Gonsalves, Thomas Howes, and Keith Stansell, the three Americans kidnapped by the FARC and freed in Operation Jaque together with Betancourt and eleven other hostages, were carrying out a mission in the fight against drug trafficking when they were kidnapped, thereby attempting to demonstrate that the FARC were impeding law-enforcement action against drug trafficking. Throughout the entire hearing, Gonsalves, who was present as a spectator, never took his eyes off the man on whom he fixed his gaze when he entered the courtroom dressed in the orange jumpsuit worn by prisoners in U.S. jails and with his hands cuffed. “He’s in handcuffs, but he has better conditions in jail than they gave us there,” he told a group of reporters after the hearing. Gonsalves said that he is not seeking “revenge,” but that he wants “Cesar” to go to jail because he thinks that he “does not believe in freedom, and he would go back to the jungle to do the same thing he did to me, or worse.” The Washington Federal District Court judge, Thomas F. Hogan, scheduled a follow-up hearing for July 30; in the meantime the defendant will remain in the D.C. jail, known for its harsh conditions.last_img read more


In spite of language barrier, Lefebvre serves as SU leader

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Comments The risk of having to deal with the innocent jokes of her teammates was enough to keep Noemie Lefebvre from saying too much. She just didn’t feel her English was good enough. At least not yet. ‘A few girls that were with me my freshman year, they were making some funny jokes about me,’ Lefebvre said. ‘They thought I was a mute or something, I didn’t talk a lot.’ What a difference two years can make. The junior outside hitter from Quebec has found a way to be a quiet leader, and in the process she has become more than just a key component of Syracuse’s winning season — she leads the team in kills (275) and digs (224). Lefebvre no longer has to worry about listening to the jokes about her English, but instead provides the worry to opposing defenses every time she goes up to make a kill. First coming to Syracuse, everything was new to Lefebvre. The country. The people. The language. Everything. The French-speaking freshman was in a new environment. There wasn’t much time to adapt to her new life, having to learn how to balance classes with volleyball all at once.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text The language barrier remained her biggest challenge. In Quebec, she took English classes that served as her only exposure to the language. Not exactly enough to feel confident about moving to a new country. ‘It was just not my first language,’ Lefebvre said. ‘I didn’t start at the bottom, I had a good base. I had English classes just as much as (American students) take French classes. But how much do you remember from that?’ It wasn’t that she didn’t know the words or how to put together a clear sentence. It was that she thought in French, and often when she said something in English, it just didn’t come out the way she wanted it. That led to the comments by her teammates. But all that’s changed now. No more comments, no more having to worry about saying something wrong. The culture isn’t new anymore, and her role as a leader is defined. Lefebvre has gone from the quiet freshman to a go-to hitter on the court. ‘She can be your go-to hitter,’ Orange assistant coach Carol LaMarche said. ‘We can rely on a few people to get a point, but you know Noemie is going to keep the ball in play and get a kill most of the time.’ For the first time, Lefebvre said she came to Syracuse completely focused, knowing what her role would be in Syracuse’s offense. She’s got the language down and knows what Big East volleyball is all about. ‘After last year, the big difference was that I just felt more comfortable with the team,’ Lefebvre said. ‘I was really coming to Syracuse comfortable in the environment, ready to step up and contribute to the team.’ When Lefebvre makes a kill, it’s impossible to miss. Her jump and devastating smash have become synonymous with the Orange’s dominating season. Defenses on the other side usually can only watch the ball come to a hard landing on their side of the court. Lefebvre has the ability to instill fear in other teams. They aren’t expecting the 5-foot-9-inch hitter to have that much power, that much accuracy behind her shot. And she does it left-handed, playing on the left side of the court. ‘They’re not used to seeing that,’ Hayley Todd, an outside hitter, said. ‘Usually, lefties play on the right side. Even though they may watch film on it or something like that, it’s completely different when you’re playing.’ The joking about her English, the adjustment to a new environment and having to balance her new life are all in the past for Lefebvre. There’s nothing else to figure out. This season, all she had to do was come in and be the player she knew she had the ability to be. That’s what she’s done. ‘It was a set of mind I had this year coming in,’ Lefebvre said. ‘This year, I felt it was my role to step in a little more and contribute a little more than I have been in the past.’ [email protected]center_img Published on October 18, 2010 at 12:00 pm Contact Chris: [email protected] | @chris_isemanlast_img read more


Doeren lists QB Mitchell as questionable

first_imgPete Thomas is North Carolina State’s unquestioned quarterback for now, but Brandon Mitchell still provides a dimension to the Wolfpack’s offense off the bench — when he’s healthy.Head coach Dave Doeren is still unsure about the quarterback’s status for Saturday’s game against Syracuse. Mitchell practiced in pads on Tuesday, Doeren said, and “there’s a chance” that he could play on Saturday.“He’s throwing the ball well every day,” Doeren said. “He feels really good in the pocket. He’s just getting more and more comfortable with the side-to-side and straight-ahead movements that you have to do.”Now he’s wearing cleats.Mitchell has played in just one game this year for NCSU — a 3-for-3, 93-yard performance in a season-opening win over Louisiana Tech — but he gives North Carolina State a different dimension.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Once Brandon’s in there,” Doeren said, “you have both where he can stretch the field. There is just one extra runner in the backfield all the time that the defense has to be concerned about.”A graduate transfer from Arkansas, Mitchell began the season as the Wolfpack’s starter before breaking his foot. He listed himself as “50-50” to return against the Orange.Doeren is taking things “day-to-day” with the quarterback and said he wouldn’t put him out on the field until Mitchell feels protected. But it’s looking more and more like that could be against SU.“It’s just how long will it take him to feel like he can be full speed,” Doeren said. “I think every day is a new day for him.” Comments Published on October 10, 2013 at 12:38 am Contact David: [email protected] | @DBWilson2 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more


Basic in Semi-finals of ATP Challenger in Izmir

first_imgBH tennis player Mirza Basic managed to qualify in the semifinals of ATP Challenger tournament in Izmir, Turkey.In the second round of the 64,000 EUR worth tournament, Basic won against Ilya Ivashka from Belarus, the 170th player on the ATP list, with the score 3: 6, 6: 1, 7: 5.Basic will play the match for placement in the finals against Romanian Marius Copil (179 ATP), who eliminated our Aldin Setkic in the second round.(Source: klix.ba)last_img