In spite of language barrier, Lefebvre serves as SU leader

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Comments The risk of having to deal with the innocent jokes of her teammates was enough to keep Noemie Lefebvre from saying too much. She just didn’t feel her English was good enough. At least not yet. ‘A few girls that were with me my freshman year, they were making some funny jokes about me,’ Lefebvre said. ‘They thought I was a mute or something, I didn’t talk a lot.’ What a difference two years can make. The junior outside hitter from Quebec has found a way to be a quiet leader, and in the process she has become more than just a key component of Syracuse’s winning season — she leads the team in kills (275) and digs (224). Lefebvre no longer has to worry about listening to the jokes about her English, but instead provides the worry to opposing defenses every time she goes up to make a kill. First coming to Syracuse, everything was new to Lefebvre. The country. The people. The language. Everything. The French-speaking freshman was in a new environment. There wasn’t much time to adapt to her new life, having to learn how to balance classes with volleyball all at once.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text The language barrier remained her biggest challenge. In Quebec, she took English classes that served as her only exposure to the language. Not exactly enough to feel confident about moving to a new country. ‘It was just not my first language,’ Lefebvre said. ‘I didn’t start at the bottom, I had a good base. I had English classes just as much as (American students) take French classes. But how much do you remember from that?’ It wasn’t that she didn’t know the words or how to put together a clear sentence. It was that she thought in French, and often when she said something in English, it just didn’t come out the way she wanted it. That led to the comments by her teammates. But all that’s changed now. No more comments, no more having to worry about saying something wrong. The culture isn’t new anymore, and her role as a leader is defined. Lefebvre has gone from the quiet freshman to a go-to hitter on the court. ‘She can be your go-to hitter,’ Orange assistant coach Carol LaMarche said. ‘We can rely on a few people to get a point, but you know Noemie is going to keep the ball in play and get a kill most of the time.’ For the first time, Lefebvre said she came to Syracuse completely focused, knowing what her role would be in Syracuse’s offense. She’s got the language down and knows what Big East volleyball is all about. ‘After last year, the big difference was that I just felt more comfortable with the team,’ Lefebvre said. ‘I was really coming to Syracuse comfortable in the environment, ready to step up and contribute to the team.’ When Lefebvre makes a kill, it’s impossible to miss. Her jump and devastating smash have become synonymous with the Orange’s dominating season. Defenses on the other side usually can only watch the ball come to a hard landing on their side of the court. Lefebvre has the ability to instill fear in other teams. They aren’t expecting the 5-foot-9-inch hitter to have that much power, that much accuracy behind her shot. And she does it left-handed, playing on the left side of the court. ‘They’re not used to seeing that,’ Hayley Todd, an outside hitter, said. ‘Usually, lefties play on the right side. Even though they may watch film on it or something like that, it’s completely different when you’re playing.’ The joking about her English, the adjustment to a new environment and having to balance her new life are all in the past for Lefebvre. There’s nothing else to figure out. This season, all she had to do was come in and be the player she knew she had the ability to be. That’s what she’s done. ‘It was a set of mind I had this year coming in,’ Lefebvre said. ‘This year, I felt it was my role to step in a little more and contribute a little more than I have been in the past.’ [email protected]center_img Published on October 18, 2010 at 12:00 pm Contact Chris: [email protected] | @chris_isemanlast_img read more


Play’n GO confirms Portuguese market presence

first_img StumbleUpon Share Related Articles EGBA – Black market looms on Spain if government proceeds with its advertising blackout July 14, 2020 David Clifton, Licensing Expert: Has the die already been cast? July 15, 2020 Submit Share Altenar: Supporting expansion plans in Denmark and Portugal August 20, 2020 Play’n GO has pulled off the latest in a series of expansion plans after securing the certification to provide its content to operators in the Portuguese market.The company said that more expansion is “set to come” to follow a very successful 2018 and moves into both Sweden and the Philippines already this year.The launch also coincides with the expansion of the company’s partnership with PokerStars Casino, one of the world’s largest online casinos, into the Portuguese market. This means PokerStars Casino players in the country will instantly have access to the library of Play’n GO content, which includes popular titles such as Rise of Olympus and Sweet Alchemy, as well as the 2019 AskGamblers Slot of the Year winner Legacy of Egypt.CEO Johan Törnqvist said: “We want as many people as possible to enjoy our games, and we also want our clients, both current and future, to be able to rely on us to have a presence wherever they seek to develop their operations.”Despite calls from the European Gaming and Betting Association (EGBA) this week urging the Portuguese gambling authorities to review the country’s tax rules for online gambling, the numbers have been trending in the right way since 2017.For example, online casino gaming revenue last year jumped from €54.4m in 2017 to €73.2m, representing an increase of 34%.However, as Portuguese media report that 75% of Portugal’s online gamblers are playing outside of Portugal’s regulated online gambling market, EGBA has described the current tax regime as discriminatory, because it “applies a more favourable tax for some operators, whilst others have to pay a much higher tax based on a broader tax base”.It has to be said that this is more discriminatory for online sports betting, for which licensed operators are taxed at between 8% and 16% dependent on betting turnover.By contrast, online casinos and online poker operators pay 15% on gross gaming revenue (GGR) up to €5 million, with a further 15% charge for revenues above the same figure.last_img read more