US hit back to take commanding lead

first_img Kimsey claimed a half from his clash with Justin Thomas while Moynihan enjoyed a 2&1 victory over Patrick Rodgers. The afternoon struggles were in stark contrast to a morning session which GB&I edged. The first match was halved with GB&I winning the next two before the United States won the final foursome of the session. The first match-up saw home pair Cory Whitsett and Bobby Wyatt refuse to let the visiting duo of Kimsey and Max Orrin capitalise on the one up lead they held on six occasions. Instead each time Whitsett and Wyatt came back to tie including on the 18th hole when Orrin hit his eagle putt 12 feet past the hole with Wyatt sinking a two-foot birdie to win the hole and halve the match. Next up was Sheffield’s Matthew Fitzpatrick, who became the first Englishman since 1911 to win the US Amateur Championship – propelling him to number one in the world amateur golf rankings – and also win the Silver Medal at July’s Open Championship at Muirfield. He was partnered by Neil Raymond and they went one up against Jordan Niebrugge and Nathan Smith at the par-four fifth, a lead they held until the 15th. The GB&I duo won the par-five 18th when Raymond hit an eagle attempt to three feet and Fitzpatrick calmly rolled the ball in for a one up victory. Raymond told www.usga.org: “To go out in foursomes over here and get the first solid point on the board was very important. I was just really happy to get it done. “I believe in my ability, and obviously believe in the world number one [Fitzpatrick] over here.” The visitors moved further ahead when Garrick Porteous and Rhys Ough defeated Michael Weaver and Todd White, three and one. Victory was clinched at the 372-yard 17th. Welshman Pugh hit his wedge approach shot to four feet. Weaver also hit a fine wedge approach to seven feet, but White missed the birdie attempt. Porteous’ birdie was conceded and GB&I claimed victory. Pugh said: “It gets my [competitive] juices flowing playing for Great Britain and Ireland. “It’s an honour and brings the best out of me.” The hosts then hit back in the final match of the session, Rodgers and Thomas defeating Moynihan and Kevin Phelan two and one. The United States took a lead they never relinquished on the 15th before Rodgers recorded the clinching birdie on the 17th, hitting a 111-yard wedge to six feet. It had looked promising for the visiting side when they established a two and a half to one and a half advantage after the morning foursomes but they were blown away following the change of format. The US were victorious in six of the eight singles with only Nathan Kimsey and Gavin Moynihan avoiding defeat for GB&I. The United States will head into the final day of the Walker Cup with an 8-4 advantage after crushing Great Britain and Ireland in Saturday’s afternoon singles. Press Associationlast_img read more


In spite of language barrier, Lefebvre serves as SU leader

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Comments The risk of having to deal with the innocent jokes of her teammates was enough to keep Noemie Lefebvre from saying too much. She just didn’t feel her English was good enough. At least not yet. ‘A few girls that were with me my freshman year, they were making some funny jokes about me,’ Lefebvre said. ‘They thought I was a mute or something, I didn’t talk a lot.’ What a difference two years can make. The junior outside hitter from Quebec has found a way to be a quiet leader, and in the process she has become more than just a key component of Syracuse’s winning season — she leads the team in kills (275) and digs (224). Lefebvre no longer has to worry about listening to the jokes about her English, but instead provides the worry to opposing defenses every time she goes up to make a kill. First coming to Syracuse, everything was new to Lefebvre. The country. The people. The language. Everything. The French-speaking freshman was in a new environment. There wasn’t much time to adapt to her new life, having to learn how to balance classes with volleyball all at once.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text The language barrier remained her biggest challenge. In Quebec, she took English classes that served as her only exposure to the language. Not exactly enough to feel confident about moving to a new country. ‘It was just not my first language,’ Lefebvre said. ‘I didn’t start at the bottom, I had a good base. I had English classes just as much as (American students) take French classes. But how much do you remember from that?’ It wasn’t that she didn’t know the words or how to put together a clear sentence. It was that she thought in French, and often when she said something in English, it just didn’t come out the way she wanted it. That led to the comments by her teammates. But all that’s changed now. No more comments, no more having to worry about saying something wrong. The culture isn’t new anymore, and her role as a leader is defined. Lefebvre has gone from the quiet freshman to a go-to hitter on the court. ‘She can be your go-to hitter,’ Orange assistant coach Carol LaMarche said. ‘We can rely on a few people to get a point, but you know Noemie is going to keep the ball in play and get a kill most of the time.’ For the first time, Lefebvre said she came to Syracuse completely focused, knowing what her role would be in Syracuse’s offense. She’s got the language down and knows what Big East volleyball is all about. ‘After last year, the big difference was that I just felt more comfortable with the team,’ Lefebvre said. ‘I was really coming to Syracuse comfortable in the environment, ready to step up and contribute to the team.’ When Lefebvre makes a kill, it’s impossible to miss. Her jump and devastating smash have become synonymous with the Orange’s dominating season. Defenses on the other side usually can only watch the ball come to a hard landing on their side of the court. Lefebvre has the ability to instill fear in other teams. They aren’t expecting the 5-foot-9-inch hitter to have that much power, that much accuracy behind her shot. And she does it left-handed, playing on the left side of the court. ‘They’re not used to seeing that,’ Hayley Todd, an outside hitter, said. ‘Usually, lefties play on the right side. Even though they may watch film on it or something like that, it’s completely different when you’re playing.’ The joking about her English, the adjustment to a new environment and having to balance her new life are all in the past for Lefebvre. There’s nothing else to figure out. This season, all she had to do was come in and be the player she knew she had the ability to be. That’s what she’s done. ‘It was a set of mind I had this year coming in,’ Lefebvre said. ‘This year, I felt it was my role to step in a little more and contribute a little more than I have been in the past.’ [email protected]center_img Published on October 18, 2010 at 12:00 pm Contact Chris: [email protected] | @chris_isemanlast_img read more