More than 100,000 meals delivered to critical frontline workers through Feed…

first_imgInstitute of Public Health addresses loneliness as a challenge to national health in light of Covid-19 restrictions Covid antibody testing opens to public at Shannon Airport Advertisement Mass COVID testing to take place at University of Limerick following fresh outbreak of virus among student population Email Twitter WhatsApp Linkedin NewsCommunityMore than 100,000 meals delivered to critical frontline workers through Feed The HeroesBy Cian Reinhardt – April 29, 2020 119 Printcenter_img TAGSCommunityCoronavirusCovid 19healthIrelandLimerick City and CountyNationalNews Limerick health chiefs urge public not to withhold information on virus contacts, as they investigate “complex and serious outbreaks” across midwest region FEED The Heroes has delivered more than 102,000 meals to critical frontline workers since being set up six weeks ago.Meals have been delivered to 101 sites across the nation including hospitals, test centres, contact tracing centres, laboratories and emergency response teams.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Feed The Heroes has raised over€1,066,290, with over 18,100 individuals donating to the fund.Among those receiving meals from Feed The Heroes are the crews of the National Ambulance Service (NAS). Anyone who has been tested for Covid-19 will have seen the large operation the National Ambulance Service are providing across the country.The NAS now spend longer time on our roads, and spend more time per call due to infection control while working under high pressure and risk.Since starting six weeks ago, the initiative has provided more than 10,00 meals to NAS teams, from control rooms in Donegal and Dublin to field operations across the country.Richard Quinlan, National Ambulance Service said the service is “much appreciated each and every day”.“NAS staff, Military staff and HSE staff out on sites getting hot food is important for wellbeing and service support. Again, thank you all so much,” Mr Quinlan said.Speaking today, Feed The Heroes founder, Cian O’Flaherty said, “To date, we have spent over €600,000 of the fund, delivering over 100,000 meals. We would like to thank everyone who has donated, what started as an idea a few weeks ago is now a nationwide operation.“This operation would not have been possible without the public’s generosity. We want to be here as long as is necessary, every donation will allow us to keep providing this service to the critical frontline workers for a day longer in this emergency.”Individuals and companies who wish to make a donation can contribute on the Feed The Heroes websitewww.feedtheheroes.com. Government announces phased easing of public health restrictions RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Previous articleAnn & Steve Talk Stuff | Episode 11 | A chance to reset?Next articleLimerick Clubs well represented as Division 1 AIL Scoring Charts released Cian Reinhardthttp://www.limerickpost.ieJournalist & Digital Media Coordinator. Covering human interest and social issues as well as creating digital content to accompany news stories. [email protected] Limerick Post Show | Careers & Health Sciences Event for TY Students last_img read more


Zika epidemic forcing scientists to rethink assumptions about human biology

first_imgOn April 13, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) joined the World Health Organization (WHO) in confirming a link between Zika and the severe birth defect microcephaly. While officials at WHO also believe that there is enough evidence to conclude that the virus causes the autoimmune nervous disorder Guillain-Barré syndrome, the CDC is waiting for the results of additional studies.Last year, the Zika virus—a mosquito-borne pathogen first identified in 1947 and never before seen in the Western Hemisphere—erupted in Brazil and has since spread to more than 20 countries in the Americas.Eric Rubin, the Irene Heinz Given Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, spoke recently about the outbreak with Madeline Drexler, editor of Harvard Public Health and author of the book “Emerging Epidemics: The Menace of New Infections.”Zika, chikungunya, dengue, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis: All of these infections jumped to the Western Hemisphere in recent years from far-flung parts of the world and are now permanently established. What does that tell you? That mosquitoes are a great way to spread disease. When you transplant a disease into a new area with the right mosquito vector, it can spread like wildfire. In the case of both chikungunya and Zika, it’s probably that people have no natural immunity and that both of those infections are being transmitted by the same mosquito—Aedes aegypti, which is extremely well-entrenched in these areas. Read Full Storylast_img read more