Pastiche de la Bourgeoisie

first_imgArtistic credibility is ultimately a question of control and transcendence, harder to effect in this Internet age. Now the arbiters of credibility are not the musicians themselves, the competition is less between artists for creative leapfrogging, but between record labels for commercial gain. Back in the ‘60s, if you knew the blues and could get a residency at the Marquee Club, that’s all you needed. Now the industry is so bloated, and artistic relevance so convoluted that making the connection is much harder, often nigh-on impossible. The Arctic Monkeys phenomenon was more down to the fortunate fusion of technology with enthusiasm than a conscious effort to define artistic credibility.Controlling influence and preventing it overriding the musician’s natural creativity is the harder skill. Rock and roll, and latterly rap and hip hop, has always been a way of vocalising power, of representing the psychology of control in a musical language. Rock and roll and blues was an illusory expression of looseness, a freedom within a tight musical structure. Artistic credibility is about sustaining this link between freedom and control, a job harder now as the line between performer and audience is constantly influenced by other parties.This question of artistic credibility also now faces the inevitable problem of an ever-widening cliff-face of influences. Back in the early ‘60s, if you were cool it was blues you were listening to, along with rock and roll. This made the performer-audience link easier to establish and maintain because their reference points were the same, to the extent that riffs and sequences were swapped and appropriated between musicians with the audience in full collusion and agreement. This created an interlocking framework of musical matrices, where the aural link was clear, cool and elite. Modern pop/rock music has so many contrasting influences that the heady whiff of the past confuses the music. This leads us to the final point about artistic credibility: it only matters if the audience are aware of the reference points the performer is using. If they are not, the comparisons are pointless and irrelevant, a sobering point for Jerry as he dusts down his promo-only copy of Marquee Moon. But this in itself is the outstretched arm between performer and audience and has its roots in the power concept. Knowing the reference point gives you, the listener, power both to feel involved with the band and the extra sense of belonging that community gives the individual. Jerry might have been in love with his bands, but what he really digs is the power the music itself abstractly represents, the power it gives him as a member of an elite, knowledgeable collective, and the power of identification with another individual, which is, after all, what the truly artistic performer needs and what the audience wants and will pay for. Artistic credibility: it’s just the redistribution of power. by Ann CoatsThere used to be an old record shop down the street where I live. A guy called Jerry owned the place. Drainpipe threads, grey highlighted hair slicked back into a rat’s tail, wizened face, a few days’ patchy stubble, black T-shirt under genuinely faded denim. Jerry loved his music. He had all the vinyl in plastic sleeves, lovingly labelled with a C to A quality system. Blues, jazz, rock, metal, hip hop – all were there in neat rows. Sure, the records were dusty, stained and smelt like a rolled-up rug in an attic, but Jerry and his shop were cool, back in the days when cool was easy, right down to the ancient gig posters on the wall, the slightly sticky floor, and the VHS tapes of long-lost bands lining the wall. He’s gone now, but Jerry was the pall-bearer for a long-lost purity of faith. His rock-fan routine was in no way affected, the grooves in his records were scratched through excess of playing, not carelessness. His was a deep sense of admiration, of constancy, loyalty. Every note on his tattered copy of Live/Dead he’d studied and assimilated. Jerry was a fan and a mythmaker, the cause and effect of rock and roll culture. He was as much of an artist as the musicians he listened to; his own arbiter of taste. He had the whole artistic credibility gig down to a T. He wasn’t talking about revolution, it was always love, power and loyalty, and whether these truths are enough. Sure, Oasis love The Beatles, sure the Stones loved Muddy Waters, but what does that actually mean? Loyalty is too often equated with hagiography. Jerry deified his heroes, because he felt, through the private aural experience of listening to a record, that they spoke to him. Like reading books that effect a mood or an atmosphere, the best records create an alternative culture or universe, where everything within that space relates to everything else. The individual becomes involved inside this sphere and this creates the illusion of empathy, in turn powerful enough to give birth to emulation.This in itself is an inevitable issue, a crisis of influence, that only the best artists can transcend. Back before the press and the critical circle that grew up around the music industry, artists wanted to please other artists. Record labels knew their returns weren’t going to be massive, so their investments weren’t so great. The machinery of TV marketing, magazine placement and music videos didn’t feature. The oft-spat at multinational record companies with their ‘tyranny’ of artistic control is actually a salute to the potential for music to reach Everyman in a way that other art forms have really been unable to do. Music is the ultimate combination of the private and the public experience and changes accordingly. It’s something to enjoy in the comfort of a room as well as in a large, unpleasant venue with thousands of others. No other art form really comes close to the objective power that represents.last_img read more


Only way is up for regional Qld real estate as it shakes off post-mining boom hangover

first_imgThe Susdorf family has their house for sale.PARTS of regional Queensland are on the cusp of a major real estate revival as they shake off the shackles of the post-mining boom hangover.Property prices have risen as much as 40 per cent in just 12 months in some areas, while towns like Emerald have bottomed and now join Mackay, Cairns, Townsville and Gladstone in the recovery phase of their market cycle, according to valuer Herron Todd White.Herron Todd White’s national property clock for October 2018 shows house prices in Queensland’s regional towns are in recovery mode.Some of the hardest hit mining regions are showing signs of life, driven by surging coal prices, capital works projects and renewed optimism.In the coastal city of Mackay, jobs are going begging and the rental market is tightening rapidly as growing confidence replaces the gloom of the past seven years.The average house price in Clermont, southwest of Mackay, has risen more than 42 per cent in the past year to $270,000 — albeit from a very low base.House prices in Moranbah, in Mackay’s hinterland, have jumped nearly 15 per cent in the past year.A surge in coal prices is benefiting regional Queensland towns that benefit from the mining industry.Real Estate Institute of Queensland chief executive Antonia Mercorella said Mackay was one of the strongest growing regions in the state, with its median house price growing 2.5 per cent to $335,000 over the year to June.“This market is benefiting from a jobs boom in the region and currently has the lowest unemployment rate in the state,” Ms Mercorella said.“Jobs are bringing people back to Mackay and as a result, the rental market is also tight, at just 1.9 per cent.”In North Mackay, a modern three-bedroom, two-bathroom townhouse at 2/28 Malcomson Street recently fetched $305,000.This townhouse at 2/28 Malcomson St, North Mackay, sold for $305,000.The latest Herron Todd White national property report shows that buyers who bought distressed properties 12 or 24 months ago in a town such as Emerald are in a position to benefit.“Those who purchased during the last boom mostly still owe more than their house is worth, or haven’t quite got back to a position of building equity, however the market is on the rise and there is light at the end of the tunnel for these owners,” the report said.The pattern is being repeated in other towns, such as Gladstone.“For so many years, renovating your property in Gladstone was a pointless exercise as any money spent would be lost as the market continued to decline,” the report said.“Now that the market has turned the corner, we have started to see more renovation work taking place.“Most of this work appears to be on properties that were purchased in the past 18 months at bottom of the market pricing.”In Beecher, near Gladstone, a contemporary three-bedroom house on an elevated 2.4ha block at 61 Surveyor Place recently sold for $430,000.This house at 61 Surveyor Plc, Beecher, sold for $430,000.Herron Todd White valuers believe Rockhampton is at the bottom of the market.And it does seem the only way is up for the city, with the average house price rising more than 37 per cent in the past year, as confidence builds on the back of a new coking coal mine being built in the Bowen Basin.The median house price is only $180,000.A three-bedroom, two-bathroom house with a pool at 13 Pillich St, Kawana, in Rockhampton sold last month for only $367,000.This house at 13 Pillich St, Kawana, sold for $367,000.The pool at the house at 13 Pillich St, Kawana.According to the REIQ, Townsville’s house price fell 3.3 per cent over the year to June to an annual median of $324,000, but local agents are reporting considerable activity with transfers coming into town.Some suburbs experienced exceptional house price growth over the year, including Thuringowa Central (up 28 per cent), Idalia (up 21.3 per cent), Rasmussen (up 19.9 per cent), North Ward (up 15 per cent) and Railway Estate (up 10.1 per cent).A four-bedroom, two-bathroom family home at 1 Santa Fe Way, Kirwan, in Townsville has just sold for only $275,000, while in the suburb of Douglas, a four-bedroom house with a pool at 219 Freshwater Drive fetched $415,000.CoreLogic head of research Tim Lawless.Angelique and Jeffrey Susdorf are selling their five-bedroom family home in Mackay to relocate to Brisbane for work.The couple, and their four children, paid $385,000 for the property at 8 Jennifer Court, Bucasia, two years ago, but have listed it for just $360,000.“Even though the market is picking up, we’re still selling at a loss,” Mrs Susdorf said.“We did have it on the market for $400,000, but we weren’t getting any inquiries.“That ($360,000) is where the market is sitting at the moment in our area.”The house is near new, a two-minute walk from the beach, close to shops and include a 4x6m powered shed.This house at 8 Jennifer Court, Bucasia, Mackay, is for sale.Marketing agent Trevor Tippett of Ray White – Mackay City said the price of houses in the $200,000 to $350,000 range had increased between 8 and 15 per cent in the past six to nine months.“There’s very little under $300,000 now,” Mr Tippett said.“There’s stronger confidence in the market, the mining sector is picking up, more businesses are opening up in town and people are moving back to Mackay.His team recently sold six houses to Sydney buyers.“People are relocating here because they’re sick of Sydney,” he said.The kitchen in the house at 8 Jennifer Court, Bucasia, Mackay. 2`Ben Chick, director of Explore Property in Mackay, is also seeing demand for housing improve.“We haven’t seen a huge price jump just yet, but a greater volume of properties are selling,” Mr Chick said.“I think there are a lot more positives now than even in the boom for longevity in the property market.“People are making appointments to look at houses who had left the area and people from down south are starting to look up here from a work perspective.“The only thing probably holding us back is people being worried about what happened four years ago, but I think we’re in a better position now for steady growth rather than another boom.”Paul Bryan, director of Mackay real estate agent Penny Wood Lane, said it wasn’t uncommon a year ago for landlords to struggle to find a tenant within eight months, but now he was fielding multiple applications for rental properties and significant jumps in rent.“I definitely think the market’s transitioning,” Mr Bryan said.“But buyers, in my opinion, are still anchored to the prices at the bottom of the market, which I think we’ve passed now.“Locals are still hovering over the ‘go’ button and if they see a good deal they’ll jump on it.”Demand for housing is surging in Mackay. Picture: Rob Maccoll.Mr Bryan said days on market for certain properties were reducing and there were more savvy buyers in the market.“This is the first spring where we’ve seen a lot more confidence … since 2012,” he said.“Prices are still quite low — there’s some really affordable property in Mackay, especially in the unit sector.”But Mr Bryan said buyers still needed to be cautious.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus16 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market16 hours ago“Going back eight years ago, you could buy four walls and a roof anywhere and you’d do well,” he said.“Now, you’ve got to be a bit careful.“I think that’s why people are hovering over the ‘go’ button, but I think next year will be the year.”CoreLogic head of research Tim Lawless said property prices had been hit hard by the mining downturn, but he said the recovery in the mining sector would prompt a turnaround in home values.“Coming into 2019, markets like Mackay should start to see some growth, we expect Toowoomba to move back into positive growth and Cairns to see a bounce higher,” Mr Lawless said.“Many of these mining towns have seen values fall 30 to 50 per cent, so it’s overdue that we see values rising again.“Anyone who owns property in those areas will be very happy with this recovery — especially if they bought in the peak around 2014.”Ms Mercorella said the state government needed to do more to support the recovery in regional housing markets.“The REIQ has lobbied the government long and hard for the first-home buyers grant to be broadened to existing properties in regional Queensland,” she said.“It is our strong conviction that this would give some of those house markets a much-needed boost as young people and first time buyers, who are struggling to save a deposit, are given that important leg up to home ownership.Importantly, these markets do not need additional supply. You can already buy an established house in these areas for less than it costs to build.”This house at 1 Santa Fe Way, Kirwan, sold for $275,000.This house at 219 Freshwater Dr, Douglas, sold for $415,000.But some industry experts, such as SQM Research managing director Louis Christopher, are urging caution.“Investors should always keep in mind that regional towns can be far more volatile in terms of prices, so timing is paramount,” Mr Christopher said.He suggested buyers look to the mining regions only to diversify their property portfolios.“Don’t put all your eggs in one basket,” he said.“Don’t make it your first investment; make it your fourth or fifth.”RiskWise Property Research chief executive Doron Peleg said the risks associated with investing in mining towns was too high.Mr Peleg attributed that view to lending restrictions, weak employment markets and the likelihood of the Labor Party winning the next federal and state elections and potentially making changes to negative gearing and capital gains tax.5 RECENT HOUSE SALES IN QLD’S MINING REGIONSRegion Address Sale price Sale date1. Townsville 1 Santa Fe Way, Kirwan $275,000 Oct, 20182. Gladstone 61 Surveyor Plc, Beecher $430,000 Sept, 20183. Townsville 219 Freshwater Dr, Douglas $415,000 Sept, 20184. Rockhampton 13 Pillich St, Kawana $367,000 Sept, 20185. Mackay 2/28 Malcomson St, North Mackay $305,000 Sept, 2018(Source: Realestate.com.au)TOP 10 MINING REGIONS FOR HOME PRICE GROWTH Region Property type Median house price Growth in 12 mths1. Clermont House $270,000 42.1%2. Rockhampton City House $180,000 37.4%3. Mooroobool Unit $274,000 34.3%4. Mirani House $337,000 18.2%5. South Mackay Unit $210,000 15.7%6. Moranbah House $185,000 14.6%7. The Range House $383,000 13.9%8. Armstrong Beach House $304,000 13%9. Seaforth House $361,000 12.8%10. Kirkwood House $353,500 10.5%(Source: CoreLogic)last_img

Grenadian attorney demands outside help to investigate fatal beating

first_img Tweet Sharing is caring! Share Derick Sylvester says the post mortem determined Oscar Bartholomew (pictured above) died as a result of trauma to the head. (Photo: Bartholomew family)ST GEORGE’s, Grenada — The attorney representing the wife of a Grenadian-born Canadian who died Tuesday, hours after being beaten allegedly by police officers, has demanded that an investigator be brought in from another jurisdiction to ensure that an independent probe is conducted into the matter.Derick Sylvester said the investigation into the circumstances leading to the death of the 39-year-old Oscar Bartholomew should be “unbiased, clear and open”.“We’re concerned that to date, no one has been detained and or arrested in relation to this matter,” he told a media conference yesterday.The attorney said the post mortem determined Bartholomew died as a result of trauma to the head, and had multiple skull fractures and a brain haemorrhage.Police Commissioner, Wilan Thompson, said the officer in charge of the police station in the eastern parish of St. David where the incident reportedly occurred has been replaced, while two others are assisting with the investigation.“To date, all the officers who were present at the station at the time of the incident have had a preliminary interview. Reports have also been submitted by the officers,” he said.“Further, some officers at the station will be reassigned to other areas so as to allow the investigation to proceed quickly and unimpeded.”But Sylvester said authorities should seek outside assistance “to ensure that it (the investigation) is fair because justice is all about perception. You can’t have the cat watching the cheese…”He said there appeared to be a “breeding of police brutality in the country” with numerous lawsuits filed against law enforcement officers over the last 10 years.On Wednesday, Prime Minister Tillman Thomas visited the family of the deceased and expressed sorrow at the incident. He said the Attorney General’s Chambers has been asked to assist with the investigation.“I have directed the respective government departments and agencies, including the Attorney General’s Chambers, to provide the support necessary for the full and unimpeded investigation of this occurrence,” Thomas stated.Bartholomew died at hospital, a day after he was arrested for assaulting an officer.This followed an incident in which he reportedly hugged a plainclothes female police officer whom he mistook for an old friend.Caribbean 360 News 69 Views   no discussionscenter_img Share Share NewsRegional Grenadian attorney demands outside help to investigate fatal beating by: – December 31, 2011last_img read more