Two journalists in Nakhichevan suffer systematic harassment

first_img “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says Receive email alerts April 9, 2021 Find out more News Reporters Without Borders has called on the chairman of the Supreme Council (Mejlis) of the autonomous Republic of Nakhichevan, Vasif Talibov, to act to protect journalists after two correspondents complained of relentless harassment.Malahat Nasibova, correspondent for the press agency TURAN and the US station Radio Free Europe, along with Mohammed Rzayev, correspondent for the opposition daily Azadlig in Nakhichevan said on 14 June 2004, that they had suffered systematic harassment for two months. Nakhichevan is an autonomous republic of Azerbaijan – an enclave between Armenia and Iran.The international press freedom organisation urged Talibov to guarantee the safety of journalists and to ensure that they could work normally free from official pressure.Nasibova and Rzayev have said they have been threatened every time they report on the harassment of the local opposition, whose members are regularly physically attacked and arrested by police.Each time they report the facts, police summon the journalists or telephone to tell them to stop covering the harassment. The journalists’ families have also received telephoned insults or threats that they will lose their jobs. Nasibova said she got phone calls and Internet messages that she risked “mourning family members” unless she stopped criticising the authorities. AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia June 16, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two journalists in Nakhichevan suffer systematic harassment Russian peacekeepers deny foreign reporters access to Nagorno-Karabakh RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan Help by sharing this information center_img RSF_en News News to go further Organisation June 4, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on Azerbaijan June 8, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more


BNC fresher up for rural award

first_imgA Brasenose fresher has been shortlisted in the Entrepreneur of the Year category for his one-man pig business in the 2008 Yorkshire Rural Awards.First-year PPEist Duncan Turnbull, from York, founded his business Yorkshire Meats, a traditional meat company specializing in breeding and rearing rare-breed pedigree Oxford Sandy and Black pigs, to be sold as a luxury product. “I am absolutely delighted about the nomination for this award, though quite surprised to be honest. It would be incredible to win, and use the proceeds to help the business grow further,” Turnbull said.Turnbull will be competing against two other nominees, the farmer Copley Farm Shops of Purston and owner of animal feed business Ian Mosey of Gilling West. The prize is the top accolade in the annual awards ceremony, which acknowledges and celebrates leading business people who have furthered development of Yorkshire’s rural economy through diversifying by bringing in new jobs.Turnbull founded his own pig business in 2000 at his parents’ farm at Shipton-by-Beningbrough in North Yorkshire. Since then he has built up a large herd of pigs, and catapulted his business to greater success in 2004 by launching an innovative adopt-a-pig scheme. The scheme allows customers to choose a pig, name it, visit it, and then eventually eat it. Turnbull’s clientele spans from Brighton to Aberdeen. He has been filmed for a BBC documentary Jimmy’s Food Heroes and BBC Radio 4’s ‘Farming Today,’ and has written a piece for the Guardian, ‘Saving Our Bacon.’“Originally it started off as a hobby and an interest. As the adopt-a-pig scheme was developed, more and more people become interested and it has really grown to become profitable,” he said.Turnbull declined to comment on details of the profits his business has reaped but confirmed: “Proceeds from the business which is profitable is financing my way through university.” Turnbull juggles his business and academic work by scheduling the busy times of the year, such as butchering, during the vacations. He has no business partners but has hired one employee. “Now, it is more a business than a hobby, but at its current size it will never be so profitable that is could be sustained as a career. Therefore you need to enjoy it, and be a little mad, to continue,” he said.The awards ceremony is due to take place on 23 May. Turnbull gets his hands dirty on his parents’ farm.last_img read more


Conscious Giving Is Better Together

first_imgThere is no muscle memory to writing a check. We forget about it just as soon as it’s cashed and unfortunately, we’re often too busy to even notice. But the people suffering without food, water or decent shelter do notice and it’s time to put an end to unconscious giving.I started my conscious giving experience with Loaves & Fishes, an organization in Northern California that feeds folks in need. Conscious giving is the idea of being an active participant in service – not just giving money, but by actually doing something. It didn’t take long for me to realize the difficult tradeoffs the people coming to Loaves & Fishers were facing. Their own funds could cover their utility bills or warm meals – not both.That year, rather than do another round of typical team building events with my EMC team, we closed our office for the day and spent time helping to feed members of our community who were in need. Not only were we doing something good for others, but we were doing something good for ourselves. The experience helped us grow closer as colleagues – working together to make a meaningful impact.Shortly after it occurred to me that if an exercise as simple as donating a few hours could excite, invigorate and motivate a group of 60 employees, then why couldn’t we invite the participation of a larger constituency of our customers and partners?Later that summer I ran a fundraising event that involved 250 EMC employees and 375 current and prospective customers and it changed the way people saw our business in our territory.It demonstrated that we have a great business dynamic. Not because we give time and money ourselves, but because we looked to our stakeholders who are just as interested in doing good in their local communities to join the effort. Conscious giving is better together!This year, we’re going big with an employee-led initiative called EMC Gives Back. With a focus on two of the world’s most basic and greatest human needs – food and water – we are committed to making meaningful and lasting social impact and to encouraging participation from our customers and partners as well.To kick off our program, we’re partnering with charity: water a non-profit organization that brings clean and safe drinking water to people in developing nations. The charity: water model is founded on 100% of public donations going straight to the field, working with strong local partners on the ground to build and maintain water projects and proving water projects through reporting.If you’re attending EMC World from May 5 – 8, be sure to swing by the EMC Gives Back Experience in the EMC Village. Not only will you learn about how to get involved, but you’ll be able to take part in a Waterwalk, a short walk carrying two 40-pound jerry cans full of water, something that women and children in developing nations do for hours each day to obtain water from a clean water source.For every walk that an EMC World attendee completes, it will unlock a donation to fund clean water wells in Ethiopia. Additionally, on May 8th, charity: water CEO and Founder, Scott Harrison, will be delivering a heartfelt keynote about social entrepreneurship that is not to be missed.EMC Gives Back builds upon our company’s existing corporate social responsibility efforts. We are proud to have been recognized as #1 for social impact and global competitiveness among computer companies in Fortune’s Most Admired 2014.I look forward to seeing how the program evolves over time and I said it once already, but it is truly worth repeating – conscious giving is better together!last_img read more


Burlington Electric, not Telecom, sparks mayoral race

first_imgBurlington Electric Department,Republican mayoral candidate Kurt Wright dropped the first bomb shell of the Burlington mayoral race yesterday with his suggestion that the city should sell the Burlington Electric Department. Wright explained that the sale would help pay for mounting debt in the city’s largest city, in particular a looming $50 million shortfall in the pension fun, a $17 million budget deficit and the on-going mess with Burlington Telecom, which along with being a financial failure to date is dragging the city’s, BED’s and Burlington International Airport’s credit rating down with it.Wright, a state representative and former chairman of the City Council, emphasized that this would not be a ‘fire sale.’ He said BED is a valuable city asset. If the city could not get a reasonable price, then it should not be sold. He said the utility could fetch more than $100 million net of debt and go a long way toward restory the city’s financial situation. BED employs about 130 and last year had revenues of $54.3 million. The McNeil generating facility is in the city’s Intervale section and its headquarters or on Pine Street. BED owns half of the 50 megawatt McNeil plant (for perspective, the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant is 605 MW).BED’s overall rates are 13.41 cents per kilowatt hour (state of Vermont, 2009), compared to the statewide average of 12.69 cents. Green Mountain Power was 11.89 cents and CVPS was12.67. The New England average was 15.86 cents; the US average was 9.98 cents.Along with paying off debt, shedding the city of BED would get rid of some risk for the city. BED has thrived in recent years as the price of natural gas has come down. The power it produces also looks relatively cheap compared to the rest of New England, which has high electric costs compared to most of the rest of the nation.Vermont in general has relatively lower rates than most other New England, and indeed Northeast, utilities, with only Maine having lower overall rates in the region for 2010 (For 2010, New England rates generally went down slightly and Vermont’s went up, putting Vermont second to Maine for 2010 where it was first in 2009). BED is lower than nearly all of them, giving ratepayers in Burlington a bit of a break.The McNeil generating plant burns wood or gas (and can burn fuel oil). When needed, BED contracts to buy power from sources that are in sync with the overall ethos of the city’s progressive politics. It does not have any contracts with nuclear plants.But this current rosy picture was not always the case and if the cost of wood or natural gas were to skyrocket, or other sources, such as nuclear is now seen doing, become much cheaper, then BED power could be relatively expensive.Needless to say, the reaction from the mayor’s office was swift.Progressive Mayor Bob Kiss said in a statement soon after Wright’s announcement that: ‘Kurt Wright’s proposal to sell the Burlington Electric Department is short-sighted and irresponsible. BED is a tremendous asset of the City. As a municipally-owned utility, it reflects important values of local rate-payer control and public accountability. BED is widely-acknowledged as one of the nation’s leading utilities with respect to the use of renewable energy sources. Selling an asset like BED for a one-time benefit undercuts Burlington’s future. It’s a short-term gimmick that lacks prudence and vision.‘The urgency suggested by this proposal is misplaced,” the mayor said. “The City is working towards constructive solutions for issues such as Burlington Telecom and the pension fund. Despite the national economy Burlington has been successful in attracting new businesses and jobs, strengthening the City’s infrastructure, and building sustainable municipal budgets that have continued to deliver quality services without the need for a general city tax increase over the last 6 years. Proposing to sell BED under these circumstances is an erratic solution to circumstances that require steadiness and careful consideration.’Vermont State Representative and Democratic mayoral candidate Jason Lorber also decried Wright’s suggestion to sell Burlington Electric.‘Kurt Wright is trying to sell out our city and Burlington values,’ said Lorber.‘Selling out Burlington Electric to private hands would be committing financial malpractice,’ he said. ‘Burlington Electric saves residents money, while reducing energy consumption. I believe that energy-independence and efficiency are paramount to sustainability. That’s what Burlington Electric does, while saving money. Burlington Values our people, our environment, and workers far above a fast buck.’last_img read more


Improving millennials’ financial literacy with mobile technology

first_imgby: Jason AldermanThe global growth of handheld digital devices among younger people is transforming the way consumers are getting their information in general, and financial information in particular.On April 15, the 2015 Financial Literacy Summit, co-hosted by Visa Inc. and the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, brought together senior international financial literacy experts to discuss how mobile technology can improve financial literacy for today’s young adults.“Millennials” refers to the demographic born between 1980 and 2000, representing the largest group of individuals using mobile banking applications. At 18 percent, millennials are also the biggest cohort partaking in Internet browsing, emailing, searching, social networking and news consumption on a smartphone or tablet. By comparison, only 5 percent of 35- to 54-year-olds and 3 percent of those 55 years and older are using mobile devices exclusively.Amando M. Tetangco Jr., the governor of Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, the central bank of the Philippines, told the audience that young Filipino adults are “struggling more than their older counterpart groups with regard to budgeting” and retirement planning, but he said he is still optimistic: “I believe there are certain characteristics of millenials that provide opportunities to build [their financial capabilities]. They have a desire for change.” Such change, he said, should be driven by data, and policy should be made personal and tied to technology solutions embraced by younger citizens. continue reading » 32SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


Momofuku joins Goldbelly as delivery service sees Covid pandemic boom

first_imgGoldbelly founder and CEO Joe ArielSource: Goldbelly Like DoorDash and Grubhub, Goldbelly is one of the beneficiaries of the abrupt shift in behavior. It’s almost doubled its restaurant and customer count on its website this year, with establishments like Shake Shack, the burger chain founded by Meyer, joining its ranks. Including Momofuku, the company has nearly 700 restaurants listed on its marketplace.“Many partners who were interested but somewhat reluctant have now embraced giving the platform a chance and said to us that they couldn’t believe they hadn’t done it sooner,” Ariel said.‘Gravy seals’ hunt for regional cravesBut Goldbelly also has some key differences from the third-party delivery apps that work with local restaurants. It ships food items anywhere in the country, rather than being bound by a two- or three-mile radius. Restaurants have the freedom to fulfill their orders during lulls, like mid-afternoon or at midnight, when the kitchen is closed to takeout and delivery customers.- Advertisement – The company also works with the restaurants to decide on the price that the consumer pays, which ultimately includes the platform’s transaction fees and the hefty expense of overnight shipping the food anywhere in the country. The food can come frozen, already assembled or as parts of a meal kit to cook the dish easily.A more frequent treatUltimately, the New York bagels or Philadelphia cheesesteaks will cost more than if a customer bought them in person. But the service is for consumers who find themselves far flung from the comfort food they want to eat. And as the current crisis restricts travel and some consumers decamp to the suburbs, they are willing to pay the premium price. The service has also transitioned from being used for special occasions to something sought out more frequently.“As the world has changed, it’s become much more of a weekly and monthly event,” Ariel said.The fourth quarter is typically Goldbelly’s busiest time of the year, thanks to the holidays, according to Ariel. The approach of Thanksgiving means an influx of orders for pies, specialty side dishes and turduckens.“This year, it’s going to be a different level because people aren’t traveling to see their families,” Ariel said.Goldbelly customers are buying multiple items to ship to different people, creating their own virtual Thanksgiving dinners via Zoom. Corporate employers are looking to give their workers and clients Goldbelly’s meal kits and virtual cooking classes in place of in-person office parties.Of course, the pandemic is also introducing new challenges to Goldbelly. Vaccine makers are worried about potential delays in their rollouts due to a shortage of dry ice. Goldbelly’s merchants use the solid form of carbon dioxide for shipping some of their items, like ice cream, across the country overnight.Goldbelly has an entire department devoted to brainstorming how to keep food items frozen — or at least cold — before they arrive to customers.“It’s something we’re keeping our eyes opened for, but we have a few different approaches to attacking that before it becomes more of an issue,” Ariel said, adding that the majority of Goldbelly orders do not use dry ice.For Goldbelly and the rest of the world, a vaccine also means a return to traveling, dining inside restaurants and all of the other occasions that were abandoned during the pandemic. But Ariel thinks that consumers will continue to order from Goldbelly as frequently as they are now.“We believe that the nationwide delivery of your favorite foods is going to continue to be a value proposition that’s really exciting for a lot of people, especially those that experienced it and made a deeper emotional connection with our brand and the platform during this time,” Ariel said. – Advertisement – And it’s the restaurants, rather than Goldbelly, that are responsible for creating and shipping their food items. The business model means that Goldbelly is profitable, according to Ariel.But eateries also benefit from joining the e-commerce site. Ariel said that some restaurants are seeing higher sales volumes on Goldbelly than from their dining rooms before the pandemic.The pandemic introduced another facet to the Goldbelly experience: live cooking classes with famous chefs like Daniel Boulud. The classes are free with the purchase of the related meal kit.Goldbelly uses a team of scouts, internally known as the “gravy seals,” to scour the country and social media for restaurants beloved by their customers or offering unique regional specialties. Eateries on the platform run the gamut from nationally known establishments to mom-and-pop restaurants.center_img – Advertisement – Goldbelly is adding chef David Chang’s Momofuku to its national delivery service as the coronavirus pandemic drives customers and restaurants to the e-commerce site in droves.CEO Joe Ariel founded Goldbelly in 2013, when he was living in New York City and couldn’t find a local restaurant to meet his hankering for Nashville hot chicken or Southern-style biscuits. It’s since raised more than $33 million in funding, and its latest [email protected], in 2018, was led by restaurateur Danny Meyer’s Enlightened Hospitality Investments.Prior to the pandemic, Goldbelly was adding restaurants to the platform at a steady clip. But as lockdowns went into place across the United States, eateries that had previously eschewed delivery services and takeout had to pivot.- Advertisement – Customers dine at Momofuku’s outdoor seating in the East Village as the city continues Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on September 26, 2020 in New York City.Alexi Rosenfeld | Getty Imageslast_img read more


Arena Hospitality Group has introduced online registration – web check-in

first_imgWeb check-in can also be used to settle the bill for accommodation according to the reservation, and all other services used during the stay are charged at the reception upon check-out, according to AHG. Also, Arena Hospitality Group campsites Arena Grand Kažela and Arena One 99 Glamping received “Recommanded 2020” awards from the renowned Italian camping magazine and portal “Golden Camping – Quality Outdoor Experiences”. Web check-in is a simple way of reporting that speeds up and simplifies the whole application process, especially nowadays due to all the epidemiological measures. The link through which the web check-in is performed is sent to the e-mail address specified in the reservation and is active three days before the date of arrival. Upon arrival at the facility, a self-service check-in kiosk can be used for quick document registration and key collection.center_img Arena Hospitality Group (AHG) in July introduced a new online check-in option – web check-in, which significantly shortens check-in times.last_img read more


Maritime Firms Team Up with Tech Startups to Drive Innovation

first_imgCopenhagen-based corporate innovation and venture development firm Rainmaking has matched five maritime giants with eight startups as part of its Trade & Transport Impact Programme.Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG (HHLA), Shell, Wärtsilä, Cargotec and Inmarsat have been paired up with startup teams from eight different countries.As informed, they will work on thirteen separate projects with the aim of accelerating innovation that delivers genuine business results.“There is growing recognition that the maritime industry needs to innovate and fast. As appetite for fresh thinking, insight, and technology swells, bringing together established maritime leaders with technology startups is what’s needed to deliver genuine business results quickly,” Nicklas Viby Fursund, Partner at Rainmaking, commented.“With our current partners; Cargotec, HHLA, Inmarsat, Shell, and Wärtsilä, we’re already seeing tangible benefits emerging from the programme. It’s exciting to see the genuine impact quality tech startups with high engagement and energy levels can make, helping to solve the problems the corporates are facing and adding value to operations.”With an industry awakening to the challenges of adjusting to an increasingly digital and decarbonized world, business as usual is not an option. Designed to tackle some of the biggest challenges in maritime trade and transport, the abovementioned program aims to disrupt the industry through its collaborative, outcome-oriented approach.The specialisms of the startups in the current round of the program range from port- and cyber security to energy-optimization and crew welfare. Current projects relate to safety, security and crew welfare, optimization of port and vessel operations, and autonomous operations and equipment. “We have had great success working with Scoutbase, whose technology collects data to reduce human error. Our business has been hugely engaged – everyone is really keen and loves the energy that Scoutbase has brought to the table, as well as the product itself. Going forward in 2020 we are really excited to hopefully start rolling this product out,” Michael Andronicou, Project Lead – New Marine Ventures at Shell, said.“We’re working with KoiReader to make improvements in the detection of container damage. While it’s currently a proof of concept, we hope to continue with the project and without Rainmaking’s Trade and Transport Impact Programme, we probably would never have met KoiReader,” Till Schlumberger, Strategy Consultant in Digital Transformation at HHLA, added.“Energy efficiency is one of the most important factors in shipping today, and we are trying to find new ways of improving it. Signol has enabled us to reach the decision makers onboard and better support them with fuel consumption, energy efficiency and operations. We need to bring in startups and knowledge from outside the industry to support us in finding ways to do things better,” Steffen Knodt, Director New Ventures at Wärtsilä, explained.The third cycle of the program begins in Q1 2020 at which point more organizations will be able to join.Rainmaking is also launching a decarbonization program in Singapore, which specifically focuses on startups with solutions that support the transition to a zero-carbon future for shipping.last_img read more


White eyes starting spot in final season

first_imgAndy Fate / The Badger HeraldFor almost his entire life, James White has never been the lead running back.When he was a three-star running back from Saint Thomas Aquinas High School in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., White was just an accent to his four-star teammate and UNC-commit Giovanni Bernard.When White arrived at Wisconsin, he was the speed to John Clay’s strength. He might have been the leading rusher, but he wasn’t the lead back.Montee Ball was the next man for White to supplement. Ball was the bratwurst. White was the beverage. Maybe Melvin Gordon was the finishing condiment. Once again, White was second in line. That all might start to change … maybe.In his last spring camp as a Badger, White has jumped up the depth chart, some would say by default, to the lead running back spot, as far as repetitions go. Finally.“James has done a good job this spring of establishing himself,” running backs coach Tom Hammock said. “He’s demanding his touches and he’s earning them. Every day he comes out to practice and earns more reps, so I’m looking forward to seeing how that develops once the season starts.”“Once the season starts” is off in the distance for White, some four and a half months before the Badgers take to Camp Randall for the regular season. It likely seems even further in the distance for the running back who has been in competition each of the last five or six years.The competition he shared with Ball didn’t leave as the clock expired on Ball’s illustrious career; it has actually probably heightened since the departure of the all-time touchdowns leader.Joining White in the Badgers’ backfield again is redshirt sophomore Melvin Gordon. The exciting jet-sweep specialist from 2012 excelled enough toward the end of the season to get many thinking White would once again be singing the second verses of the running back band.But while Gordon has been sidelined recently for Wisconsin’s practice, redshirt junior Jeff Lewis also threw his name into the mix, rushing for 74 yards on 16 carries during Saturday’s scrimmage, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. No matter where he seems to go, White tends to bring a competition with him.“I won’t say committee, but I’m going to let these guys fight for those carries,” Hammock said of his attempts to fill the void left by Ball, which may take all of three backs to satisfy. “If you want 20 carries, fight for them, and then go out there and earn it during the game.”It’s obvious that fighting for carries is nothing new to No. 20. What is likely new for him, however, is the leadership role he is now thrust into as the lone senior running back. Until this point, White always had an upperclassman leading the way. Now it’s his turn to lead.“We’re all competing out here, all the running backs. Everybody is fighting for that starting job,” White said. “I’m just trying to work hard and have a positive attitude out here and try to lead by example.”He sure did that during Saturday’s scrimmage. White did most of his damage on a pair of long runs in addition to a goal line touchdown carry. White said those carries are exactly how he likes to run; taking what his offensive line gives him and “wait for the long runs to come.”Those long runs are a big part of what White brings to the table as a running back. They are a big reason why he leads the nation in rushing among all returning running backs.While Ball had his days of explosiveness, White’s pedigree stems from finding seams and accelerating into the defensive backfield. It’s what Hammock enjoys seeing from him, too.“For the type of back that you are, you’ve got to make people miss,” Hammock said,  reciting what he tells White. “At the end of the day, when you’re in the open field, you’ve got to want it. That changes drives, that changes games, that changes seasons.”Having White lead the backfield also changes things a bit for redshirt sophomore fullback Derek Watt.Watt earned the starting fullback position in 2012 and will more than likely own the position again this season. He’ll be blocking for an entirely different lead back, however, regardless of whether White is the man or not.“[White] is a little more shifty – he can get outside and he can squeeze through little openings,” Watt said. “He’s a little different than Montee, not quite as big; he’s a lot smaller. But he’s got his own little way of doing things.”That might come from his upbringing, or at least Hammock would like to think so. His coach presumes that, if it comes White’s way, assuming the lead running back spot would be a product of how his parents raised him.“The one thing about James White is that he is the most solid, hard-working individual that I’ve been around,” Hammock said. “He’s going to come to work every day and not say two words.”“I call him the true professional because he knows what it takes.”last_img read more


Srinivas Gowda’s 100m record has been broken just a few day on by another…

first_imgImage Courtesy: ABP/EPSAdvertisement 2qrNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs46fq4Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ebk3a( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) ljWould you ever consider trying this?😱1zi5Can your students do this? 🌚ns9rRoller skating! Powered by Firework Last week, a buffalo racer from Karnataka became an overnight sensation on the sports fandom of the country, for breaking the iconic sprinter Usain bolt’s 100m record. The news broke out all over the internet, and the racer named Srinivas Gowda came under the radar of Sports Minister Kiren Rijiju. However, there is a new contender now. Another buffalo racer named Nishant Shetty has leaped beyond Gowda’s clocked time, setting a new world record for covering 100 metres in just 9.51 seconds!Advertisement Image Courtesy: ABP/EPSThe legendary Usain Bolt, who set the 100 metres world record of 9.58 seconds back in 2009. After staying unbroken for eleven years, the Jamaican spriner’s record fell short as Srinivas Gowda clocked the same distance in 9.55 seconds, covering a total distance of 142.50 metres in 13.62 seconds.While speculations were going on Gowda being the next big name in the world of sprinting- Nishant Shetty achieved the same fate while being 0.04 seconds quicker, a new twist in the event.Advertisement Hailing from Bajagoli Jogibettu, Shetty took part in the ‘at Soorya-Chandra Jodukare Kambala (buffalo racing) event at Venoor, Karnataka this Sunday. Riding two buffaloes named Bolle and Kaje, woned by Erimaru Gopalakrishna Bhat, Shetty covered a distance of 143 metres in 13.68 seconds.Speaking to reporters, Shetty revealed that his performance at the Kambala (Buffalo racing) at Venoor is his career best.While Kiren Rijiju had already requested the Sports Authority of India to conduct a trial for Gowda, the racer declined the offer on meeting the Karnataka CM BS Yediyurappa.“I never thought will run this fast. The main role was played by the buffaloes and the owner. He looked after them well. The buffaloes can run even faster,” Gowda said following his refusal for the trial.“In Kambala race, heels play an important role whereas it is toes in a track race. Not just jockeys, but even Buffaloes have a role to play in Kambala. In track race, this is not the case” he added.However, there hasn’t been any input from Kiren Rijiju or the SAI on Nishant Shetty yet. The new fastest man of India has reaching stardom just as Gowda did last week, but it is still unknown if he will signal positive for a sprint trial, or follow Gowda’s decision.Also read-Did this buffalo racer from Karnataka just beat Usain Bolt’s world record for a 100m sprint?See the message Sports Minister Kiren Rijiju has for bullock race runner who beat Usain Bolt’s world record speed Advertisementlast_img read more