Mike Fitzpatrick to be appointed to City of Culture

first_imgLifestyleArtsNewsBreaking newsLocal NewsMike Fitzpatrick to be appointed to City of CultureBy admin – January 7, 2014 900 Andrew CareySign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up MIKE Fitzpatrick, a Limerick based academic and curator, is likely to be announced as the person to take charge of City Of Culture festival operations in an interim basis following the resignations of both Patricia Ryan and Karl Wallace recently.The board of Limerick National City of Culture 2014 is to hold a press conference this afternoon at the Clarion Hotel, Limerick.A statement said “The Board will announce at this media event a number of measures undertaken in response to recent matters”.Attached to the Limerick School of Art and Design, Mr Fitzpatrick is expected to take up the running of both vacant positions.Arts officer, Sheila Deegan, is also likely to be appointed to a senior role. Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Shannondoc operating but only by appointment First Irish death from Coronavirus Advertisement WhatsApp Previous articleBetting opened on next City of Culture CEONext article#VIDEO Ralph Lauren’s niece to be sentenced over air rage incident admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Printcenter_img Linkedin Facebook Twitter No vaccines in Limerick yet Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended TAGSfeatured Email Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHLlast_img read more


There’s no second “1st” place

first_imgOnce the baton is dropped in the leadership race . . . your credit union is at risk. Strategic Succession Planning is a critical step to serving that purpose and mitigating unnecessary risk. If for any reason your CEO departs and you have not identified or groomed a “step in” or “drop in” candidate, your members are not being served. You have not adequately mitigated risk. This is not a gray area; but very black and white.There are many reasons why a CEO may no longer be available for work. Regardless of the reason; the board has a responsibility to have potential successors ready to serve. A strategic succession plan covers all the bases for CEO departure for any reason:Incapacitating illnessSudden demiseSurprise departureUnder performingNormal retirementOrganization restructureSuccession Planning is a process to ensure that the right people are in the right places at the right time. It is not a ‘Drive By’ event that leaves leadership to chance and risks the purpose of the credit union. The board of directors is responsible for hiring the CEO and, consequently, that future potential successors are identified and available when needed. The CEO is responsible for the development of potential successors. Ensuring proper succession to the CEO desk is a responsibility with an outcome that materially impacts the members, employees, community, and the future of the credit union. It should be taken seriously as it is could be the most important decision the board will make. This article describes a systematic process for the board to ensure that the right people are ready at the right time so they can be in the right place.Creating a robust and fail safe Succession Plan requires a structured and systematic process. It is the boards’ responsibility to decide what competencies are required to meet present and future needs of the credit union. Use the strategic plan as a beacon for developing a list of competencies, both hard and measurable skills, and soft, personal mastery skills. Competencies need to be defined so there is no misunderstanding of how to measure performance of that competency. A Succession Plan needs to be updated every time there is an update in the strategic plan. The CEO Position description needs to be reviewed and updated on an annual basis. A written position description should include measurable work habits and personal skills required to achieve a work objective.Using a qualified facilitator for your first time through a systematic process will provide a foundation for moving forward and updating your Succession Plan every year. There are certified coaches with specific disciplines in Succession Planning and online templates to document and create performance yardsticks for competencies. This is deep and serious work that will strengthen the organizational competencies and capabilities. As a member of a board that creates a robust Succession Plan, you will be adding value that will positively impact your credit union for years to come. . . . the baton will be passed in the Leadership race. 41SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Deedee Myers Deedee Myers is founder and CEO of DDJ Myers, Ltd. and co-founder of the Advancing Leadership Institute. For the past 20 years, she has been passionate about establishing and developing … Web: www.ddjmyers.com Detailslast_img read more


‘He jumped so high it scared me’: Elijah Hughes’ unheralded athleticism

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on February 19, 2020 at 11:38 pm Contact Michael: [email protected] | @MikeJMcCleary Elijah Hughes baited his defender on the wing and cut backdoor toward the rim. It was the first day of live practice for John F. Kennedy Catholic (New York) High School in 2013, and during 3-on-3 drills head coach Al Morales was eager to unveil a 16-year-old Hughes. One who could pass like a point guard and score like a shooting guard. Two separate growth spurts led to a near overnight surge.Hughes received the pass inside and rose up. Nothing fancy: a two-handed dunk. He slammed it hard, though. Too hard. The rim burst off the backboard and sent Hughes crashing to the ground as shards of glass hailed down. Hughes felt the glass in his hair. “Am I bleeding? Am I bleeding?” Hughes frantically asked Morales.“To see it on TV is one thing,” Morales, who informed Hughes he was fine, said. “It was breathtaking.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCourtesy of Elijah Hughes’ FacebookFor years, Hughes has elevated his reputation through shooting and a strong feel for the game. But the most unheralded aspect of Hughes’ game is the athleticism that unlocks much of his arsenal. As the most experienced Syracuse (14-11, 7-7 Atlantic Coast) player, Hughes has been thrust into a role as its main offensive threat. The new role led to new expectations and new freedoms that allowed his athleticism to flourish on crossovers, quick first steps to the basket and powerful finishes at or around the rim.“I kind of always had a little boogie,” Hughes quipped in October. “I just really haven’t shown it.”At Syracuse, Hughes has flashed his athleticism with a rim-rattling dunk against Georgia Tech earlier in the season and quick bursts on drives to the rim against Florida State last Saturday. Over SU’s final stretch of the season, a hobbled Hughes will have to rely on that athleticism to carry a heavy workload for an SU team with dwindling NCAA Tournament chances.Hughes’ father, Wayne, said his son never had natural “Oh my goodness, this kid can fly” athleticism, so he learned how to dunk like most kids do: by lowering the adjustable hoop in his backyard to eight feet. Wayne and Hughes’ mother, Penny, remembered him jumping around outside every day, cocking his arm back and throwing down tomahawks and windmills. Hughes bumped it to nine feet, then messed around at regulation height.After Playmaker Academy AAU practices in the eighth grade, Hughes and his teammates stuck around to show off dunks sandwiched between multiple failed attempts. In a game later that year, Hughes’ teammate Justin Mitchell stole the ball and streaked down the court for a left-handed dunk. Hughes and his teammates erupted. No one had ever dunked in a game before. A few plays later, Hughes knocked the ball loose and did the same.“The whole team was hype,” Hughes’ then-head coach Ken Dawson said.Emily Steinberger | Design EditorFrom that point, it was “automatic,” Wayne said. Hughes parlayed his athleticism into other aspects of his game. Quick bounces on defensive plays has led him to become one of the top-15 shot-blockers in the ACC this season. He chases high after rebounds and elevates for a high release-point on layup finishes.“He jumped so high it scared me,” recalls Kelvin Jefferson, Hughes’ former South Kent (Connecticut) High School head coach.Dunk contest wins became a routine, and on Hughes’ first trip to Syracuse for the Elite Camp the Orange host each summer, he performed dunks in free time and attracted crowds, Beacon High School teacher Scott Timpano said.Kennedy Catholic teacher Brian Bruder and his son, Declan, sat in the stands at Kennedy Catholic as an 11th-grade Hughes broke away from defenders into the open court. The crowd braced for something amazing. “Appointment television,” Bruder said. Hughes unleashed a tomahawk dunk at the rim, and the crowd erupted.Bruder got home later that night and heard a thumping noise in Declan’s room. He opened the door, and Declan was jumping around, cocking back his arm and throwing down dunks into the plastic Nerf basketball hoop attached to the door.“What are you doing?” Bruder asked, laughing.The then-9-year-old Declan continued to jump around his room. He was just being a kid. And learning to dunk like Elijah Hughes. Commentslast_img read more