Devin Booker laughs at idea of playing as Suns in ‘NBA 2K’ Players Tournament

first_imgBook didn’t wanna run with the Suns 🤣@DevinBook ➡️ [email protected] ➡️ Lakers pic.twitter.com/ITcn4y5xOl— NBA 2K20 (@NBA2K) April 6, 2020MORE: Donovan Mitchell falls in best game of tournament so farBooker, in his fifth year in the NBA, increased his scoring output to 26.1 points per game this season. He’s generally remained hopeful that the Suns can build around him to become a contender.The roster building clearly has a long way to go, though, and Booker chose to rock the more reliable Bucks against Porter and the Lakers instead. Devin Booker was not about to risk his status in the “NBA 2K” Players Tournament to make his Suns feel good about themselves.Phoenix held a 26-36 record when the NBA season was put on indefinite hold last month due to the coronavirus pandemic. Booker, then, knew it would be a joke to use his real-life team. That’s why he reacted with laughter when first-round opponent Michael Porter Jr. said Booker should pick the Suns and let him choose his real-life Nuggets squad.last_img read more


TRAGIC WOMAN WHO HELPED SAVED 50 LIVES DIED THROUGH LACK OF OXYGEN

first_imgA young woman whose organs helped to save the lives of 50 people, died because she may not have had enough oxygen going to her brain.The late Lisa Orsi helped to save 50 lives.Tragic Lisa Orsi collapsed while on holiday in Indonesia and later died in hospital.The 22 year old from Derry, spent much of her time in Donegal and is now buried at Massmount Cemetery in Fanad. An inquest was held into the beautiful young woman’s death in Singapore.Lisa’s finals hours were recalled at the inquest.It reveals how the physiotherapist had been visiting a volcanic crater a Mount Bromo.She returned to her hostel which was 6,000 feet above sea level and complained to her friends of having an earache and feeling unwell. Her room-mate revealed that Lisa was making some odd breathing noises.She was found the following morning lying face-up in a shower and had difficulty opening her eyes.Lisa was taken to a clinic where a doctor found that her brain had swollen.She was then flown to Singapore General Hospital where she was diagnosed as suffering from high altitude cerebral oedema – an accumulation of fluid on the brain caused by extreme altitude sickness.The final cause of death at the inquest was given as hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy, caused by a lack of oxygen to the brain.Her family gave the go ahead to have extensive transplant surgery so that other could live as a result. Lisa’s parents Dennis and Sharon, brother Jonathan and sister Shannon, al travelled to the hospital to be with Lisa in her final hours.Dad Dennis said he knew when he arrived at the hospital that things were not good.“I knew by Lisa, I opened her eyelid and her eyes were empty. I knew there was nothing there.“I want it in my had and in my heart that Lisa’s heart is beating somewhere on this planet, it’s not important where. “It’s important to me that the person is having a good life, a happy life and a fulfilling life with Lisa’s heart.“The organ donations don’t help the grieving process. But it moves it on slightly,” he said.TRAGIC WOMAN WHO HELPED SAVED 50 LIVES DIED THROUGH LACK OF OXYGEN was last modified: September 5th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:braindonegalFanadLIsa Orsiorgan donationsoxygentragiclast_img read more


ARC-CO and PLC payments for this fall likely to decrease

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The tight economics of row crop production in 2017 will have many producers looking for some cash flow from farm bill programs when those payments are released this fall.Higher yields in 2017, however, will likely mean smaller payments in October of 2018 compared to last fall.“We saw yields that were pretty high for corn above trend line for some counties for the fourth year in a row in 2017. So looking forward to October of 2018,  I am expecting smaller to no payments for most counties for corn. A couple of counties in western Ohio may trigger a soybean payment but the payments are expected to be a lot less,” said Ben Brown, Ohio State University Farm Management Program
manager. “If you are counting on the money in October for cash flow, I don’t know that we will see as much. Both farmers and ag lenders need to prepare for that.“In 2017 we saw roughly $50 an acre for corn across the state. The only Ohio county that didn’t receive a corn payment was in Ashtabula County because they had higher yields in 2016. Some counties soybeans triggered substantial payments for 2017. Last October saw a pretty nice return from programs in Ohio. I don’t know that we’re going to see that in 2018.”Most of Ohio’s row-crop acres are enrolled in the Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC-CO) Program, with far fewer acres enrolled in the Price Loss Coverage (PLC) Program.“At the start of the farm bill in 2014 there was a one-time choice over the life of the farm bill. In Ohio we saw 97% of soybean acres go into ARC-CO. The program has never returned a PLC payment for soybeans. The PLC payment was set lower than we’d expect market prices to be and it wasn’t attractive for soybean growers in the state,” Brown said. “And 98% of corn acres are in ARC-CO in Ohio. For wheat it was 82% in ARC-CO and 18% in PLC. That was different than the national average for wheat that was 60% PLC and 40% ARC-CO. Looking forward to this next farm bill, farmers will probably get to choose and forward thinking about that is going to be important for their cash flow.”It is also important to note, Brown said, that these farm bill programs only offer a safety net, not a path to profitability.“I do want to make the distinction that ARC-CO and PLC programs don’t make you whole,” he said. “They are only on 85% of the acres so the returns you get back are smaller than you would get if the market was high.”While farmers should prepare for lower farm bill payments this fall, that does not mean there will be none. The final payment numbers still have an opportunity to change from Brown’s estimates. ARC-CO and PLC payments are calculated from a formula using Farm Service Agency (FSA) yields and marketing year average prices. The estimations from Brown use National Agricultural Statistic Service yields for 2017, but the adjusted final FSA numbers will be used for the final farm bill payment calculation. Also, the corn and soybean marketing year is Sept. 1 to Aug. 31, so final prices will not be known for several more months. Brown’s estimates were made using World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) average prices from February. Marketing year average prices of $3.30 for corn, $9.30 for soybeans, and $4.60 for wheat were used for the estimates.As the marketing year progresses, it is likely that these estimates will fluctuate with price. Higher prices moving forward will result in smaller 2018 payments than estimated and lower prices will result in larger payments based upon the 2017 program year, Brown said.“More counties are expected to trigger soybean payments this fall. We have also reached a point where the PLC program is returning larger payments than ARC-CO for corn and wheat. Soybeans are not expected to trigger a PLC payment for 2018,” Brown said. “Expectations for program year 2017 corn ARC-CO payments will be smaller and rare across much of Ohio. This is largely because of the formula benchmark lowering each year as a result of lower prices. In previous years the historical five-year revenue included high prices from marketing year average 2011/12 and 2012/13. Those have been worked out of the formula and the probability of triggering a payment has lowered. The 5-year olympic average price in 2016 was $4.79 compared to a price of $3.95 in 2017. Payment variations across counties happen due to variations in yields. Highland County triggers the largest estimated payment at $37 per acre as a result of a 2017 yield of 167 bushels per acre compared to a 2016 yield of 176. The average payment in 2016 was $57 whereas in 2017 it is estimated at $12. Fewer counties are expected to receive a payment with a smaller average payment in comparison from 2016.” Prepared by Ben Brown Prepared by Ben Brown Prepared by Ben Brownlast_img read more


California’s New Privacy Laws Stop Employers From Social Snooping

first_imgadam popescu Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img Tags:#privacy#security#social media California residents, take note: Those nosy bosses are no longer allowed to poke around on your Facebook profile or force you to open up a personal Twitter account.Say hello to California’s new social media law, which took effect January 1. The new regulations make significant changes to the way businesses treat social media. But while some benefits are clear, others are harder to define, and could lead to legal problems later.Technically an adjustment to the labor code, the Employer Use of Social Media law is an important step to creating a barrier between the work force and management, adding much-needed do’s and don’ts to previously nebulous territory. The new law specifically prohibits private and public employers from demanding usernames and passwords to access personal social media accounts or requiring an employee or applicant to show the contents of social media accounts to bosses.While this may frustrate some managers, the new law works to protect employees, mandating that employers cannot discipline in any way an existing or prospective employee for failing to comply to demands to view social media content. But the law does not prohibit employers from accessing information through employer-provided devices or on social media accounts. And there’s still some ambiguity surrounding allegations of account misuse, which can then give employers the green light to demand to see behind the curtain. It’s Not Black And WhiteThe main challenge to the law is ambiguity and enforcement, says San Diego-based Jim McNeill, a partner at the law firm of McKenna Long & Aldridge and a specialist in labor and employment relationships.The problem is the notion of misconduct, which the law broadly states can be a reason for accessing social media accounts, without giving a clear definition of what misconduct is. Misconduct can be interpreted on a case-by-case basis, so McNeill thinks this caveat will end up being decided in court. “If allegations against an employee were that they were engaging in going on the Internet and accessing their personal Facebook account on work time, would that suffice to allow the employer to demand access to the account?” McNeill asks. Another problem, he added, is the use of employer-owned devices and technology – especially when employees are not on the clock. If they’re accessing personal accounts via the company-owned smartphones or laptops, where is the line drawn between personal and private information?“The interesting part there is how that’s going to interact with employee access to a site with the employer’s device, off company time,” McNeill says. McNeill believes the law can help employees make smarter decisions about what they say on social media sites, because talking trash about an employer could count as misconduct and be grounds for employer eavesdropping. But its ambiguities make navigating this new law a possible trap within the legal system. Treating Social Media PersonasIn that vein, Heather Meeker, the vice president of corporate communications for free text and mobile service textPlus, still recommends not posting “anything online that you wouldn’t be comfortable having shared publicly.”Nick Cicero, the lead social strategist at Livefyre, a San Francisco-based commenting and social engagement platform, says one way to protect yourself is to have a “distinct separation of work and personal accounts.” But with our personal lives more and more entwined with our professional personas, that can be easier said than done – especially if you use social media as part of your job. “Unfortunately the evolution of online identity doesn’t always make this an easy black-and-white reality,” Cicero laments.One solution to help navigate this ambiguous new law is detailed intra-company social policies that clearly spell out do’s and don’ts. “Companies looking to have a handle on their employees’ social media activities should lay out a comprehensive social policy as to how employees should act online. That way there is an understanding between company and employee at all times,” Cicero explains. “We support openness and individualism.”But if you work in a company that’s less open-minded, you might want to double check just how individual and open you want to be. Image courtesy of Shutterstock. Related Posts last_img read more