Alewijnse’s Electrical Package for De Beers’ New Mining Vessel

first_imgAlewijnse has secured a contract to supply complete electrical package on board De Beers Marine Namibia’s newest Additional Mining Vessel 3 (AMV3).Alewijnse is working with the Damen Shipyard Mangalia in Romania, where the vessel is being built.The AMV3 is a complex vessel and the build involves partners from the mining industry as well as the maritime sector.This involves a 300-tonne crawler machine which deploys a mechanical arm that moves in a horizontal arc, dredging material from the seafloor immediately below the hull at depths of around 130m. A large onboard processing plant then sifts the dredged gravel on board the ship, removing the diamonds and sealing them in metal canisters.Another large and complex system is the seven thruster, DP2 dynamic positioning system that will be powered by six generators of 3,230 ekW each.The first steel was cut for the vessel in May 2019 and now Alewijnse is preparing to start work on board.A team of over 200 skilled technicians will work on the project until December 2020, and the vessel is due to begin work off the coast of Namibia in 2022.Alewijnse project manager Catalin Androne said: “We look forward to starting on board. This is a new type of vessel for us and our first time at the Mangalia yard so we will be learning a great deal as we proceed, but it’s always good to be working with Damen. The time allowed for the works is very tight, but we are quite used to that! Good coordination and effective planning will be the keys to success and our own steelwork team will also be a valuable asset.”“We won this contract based on our reputation and years of experience on special projects,” said Petrica Craciun, sales manager at Alewijnse Marine Galati, “And we have worked with the Damen Group on challenging one-off projects before. This will be our first time at Damen Shipyards Mangalia but once again we will have the opportunity to demonstrate our know-how, flexibility and our capabilities beyond conventional ships and into sophisticated, special-purpose vessels.”last_img read more


Pardew goes for flat pack four

first_imgDIY expert Alan Pardew is taking the IKEA approach to dragging Newcastle out of the doldrums. The Magpies host Liverpool on Saturday having put together a run of three successive – and increasingly unlikely – victories to ease themselves out of the Barclays Premier League relegation zone and into the Capital One Cup quarter-finals. Each win has relieved some of the pressure on Pardew and while some supporters may not be fully behind him, the pressure has eased with the players clearly firmly behind the 53-year-old. The celebrations at the final whistle said much about the changing atmosphere at the club, although Pardew, who has had to contend with concerted calls for his head in recent months, made a swift and low-key exit. He said: “As an experienced manager, I’ve experienced times like that before – not perhaps with the scale of the media criticism that I was receiving, but certainly in terms of results. “I’ve had results like that at Charlton and West Ham, and you have to try to find a solution. If you don’t believe you’re strong enough as a character to find a solution, then don’t do the job. “I’m confident I can do this job and I was always confident I could turn it around.” A fourth win on the trot against Liverpool would help to cement that recovery, although Pardew is wary of the Reds’ enigmatic summer signing Mario Balotelli and his struggle to impose himself following his return to English football. He said: “I think he’s a great player, I really do. When I’ve seen the really, really big games come along, he has delivered for Italy and in the big games for Manchester City. “I think big games turn him on a little bit. It’s probably the other games that you really need to focus on him, and I think that’s probably an area he needs to improve on. “I think we’re a big game – we’re on the telly, he’s under a lot of pressure, so I’m very wary of him because he can deliver on those days.” Press Association However, Pardew insists his methods, which he likens to assembling a piece of flat-pack furniture, would not have worked if he had ignored the instructions and found himself with a wobbly structure and a handful of nuts and bolts left over. He said: “You’ve kind of got to box it down. It’s a bit like one of those IKEA furniture packs you buy – you can’t try and get to the end, you’ve got to do all the little bits to get there, and it takes time. “I’ve done a few of them because my wife’s Swedish. It’s about doing that little bit first, and if you get that wrong, the second bit doesn’t work. If you get the second bit wrong, the third bit definitely ain’t working and the tabletop is all… “I think it’s very important, if you’re in the coaching or managerial world, that you actually segment it down and just say, ‘Right, what’s our problem, what do we need to do, what needs to happen at this football club to turn us from what we are to a better team?’. “I also think the last international break was important for us so we could do a review of how we were getting at teams and how they were getting at us. I think that helped us. “I think we’ve put some blocks in place that now gives us some sort of thing to hinge on to.” Newcastle ended their wait for a first league win of the season with a scratchy 1-0 victory over Leicester on October 18, and followed it up with a more impressive performance to edge out Tottenham 2-1 at White Hart Lane after falling behind last weekend. But perhaps the best of the lot was Wednesday night’s 2-0 Capital One Cup victory at Manchester City in which Ryan Taylor, playing his first senior game for 26 months, and youngsters Rolando Aarons and Adam Armstrong made light of the high-quality opposition they faced. last_img read more