RSF backs Chad’s “Day without Press” protest

first_img November 27, 2020 Find out more Many historic publications threatened with closure in Chad February 22, 2018 RSF backs Chad’s “Day without Press” protest Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Chad ChadAfrica Events Impunity News News Radio stations were silent and newspapers were missing from newsstands in response to a call by the Union of Chad Journalists (UJT) and other journalists’ associations for a “Daywithout Press” to denounce the attacks on journalists and media by Chad’s political police, called the National Security Agency (ANS), and the regular police. The UJT cited the case of Djimet Wiché, the publisher of the Alwihda Info news website, who has been the victim of threats and violence by the ANS and the police twice in recent weeks.“We support this protest by the Chadian media, for whom silence has become the only means left for drawing attention to the very difficult conditions in which journalists have to work,” RSF said. “Journalists are too often targeted by the security forces, who usually enjoy complete impunity. It is time the authorities realized that the role played by journalists is essential for a democratic society to function properly. The authorities should also remember that it is their duty to guarantee journalists’ safety.” UJT president Larmée Belrangar said there was no dialogue between the authorities and the various press organizations. “We have tried repeatedly to talk with the authorities but there is no compromise”, Belrangar said. Chadian journalists are often arrested in connection with the articles they write. Investigative reporting about impunity and criticism of President Idriss Déby Itno are not tolerated.Chad is ranked 121st out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index. December 1, 2020 Find out more Reports Reporters Without Borders (RSF) supports the Chadian media outlets that stopped broadcasting and publishing for the entire day 21 February, in protest against the often violent harassment of journalists and recent closures of community radio stations.center_img to go further Receive email alerts News capture d’écran de la Une du site d’information Alwhida Info ce mercredi 21 février Chadian radio stations on strike in protest against violent raid The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa Organisation RSF_en ChadAfrica Events Impunity October 7, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more


A wall of color, a window to the past

first_imgAs brilliant as any of the works in the Harvard Art Museums’ galleries is a rainbow of small glass jars on the building’s fourth floor.Curious visitors who turn left exiting the museums’ elevators will see the Forbes Pigment Collection, a floor-to-ceiling wall of color compiled between about 1910 and 1944 by the director of the Fogg Art Museum.“In thinking about the role of a university museum, he was the first to conceive of it as ‘a laboratory for the fine arts,’ ” noted research curator Francesca Bewer in her book “A Laboratory for Art: Harvard’s Fogg Museum and the Emergence of Conservation in America, 1900–1950.”Edward Forbes’ fascination with a painting’s colors and their binding medium — a close inspection of which could help to determine a work’s authenticity — fueled his desire to use science to understand and study great works of art. He is often cited as the father of the field of art conservation in the United States.Narayan Khandekar, director of the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, shares a selection of intense colors with curious backstories. Photos by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerBy the 1920s, Forbes had amassed containers of deep blues, rich purples, vibrant yellows, and myriad other colors from his travels to Europe and the Far East. Through the years, word of mouth helped the collection to grow as other art lovers and experts donated their own pigments. The museums’ collection, which is continually added to, now contains more than 2,500 samples and is renowned in the art community. For years, the pigments have helped art experts to research and authenticate paintings. Samples from the collection have been sent to the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Library of Congress, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, and the National Research Laboratory for Conservation of New Delhi, India.In Cambridge, Forbes’ legacy thrives in the museums’ Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, where experts preserve masterworks for future generations and decipher the chemical makeup of paint and pottery glaze. In addition to being their own artworks, Forbes’ pigments are a window to the past, shedding light on the working methods and preferred materials of renowned artists. Studying the pigments also reveals the effort it took, in the days before synthetic pigments, to get colors just right.Earlier this year, Narayan Khandekar, the Straus Center’s new director, pulled out for inspection a selection of intense colors with curious backstories to share:A piercing, precious blueSkill was needed to extract the rich blue hue from the lapis lazuli stone mined from quarries in Afghanistan. Preparers carefully ground the precious rock into particles small enough to work with yet “large enough to contain the blue color,” said Khandekar, holding up a jar of intense deep-blue powder. The color was used in medieval paintings. More prized than gold, it “often warranted its own budget line in agreements.”,Synthetic blueDirector of the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies Narayan Khandekar explains how the creation of a synthetic substance, which was chemically identical to the pigment produced from the semiprecious stone lapis lazuli, opened up a new world of blue hues to artists. Pulling purple from the ocean floorThe key ingredient to another expensive pigment lurked in ocean waters. A secretion from the predatory sea snail Bolinus brandaris (originally known as Murex brandaris) provided the base for the deep, blue-red hue known as Tyrian purple, explained Khandekar. Its high cost rendered it a status symbol, and Byzantine emperors forbade anyone outside the imperial court from using the violet dye, lending it the distinction “royal purple.”,A priceless purpleKhandekar explains the aquatic origins of Tyrian purple. Shiny, precious metalThere are small jars of shimmering metal pigments, often found in automotive finishes, that gradually made their way into 20th-century pop art. English painter and collage artist Richard Hamilton was fond of spraying the metal flakes, suspended in a binding medium, on his works to give his art a shining glow, said Khandekar. “They are kind of extraordinary, these tiny bits of metal that you find on various works.”,Metals in metallic paintThe use of tiny metallic flakes suspended in a binding medium can give artworks a shining finish. Of crimson originThere are samples of kermes, an Old World pigment created by grinding tiny blisters produced by the insects Coccus ilicis, which lived on the kermes oak tree. Harvard’s sports teams, students, and alumni everywhere owe a debt of gratitude to the little bugs: Kermes is also the source of the word “crimson.”,Kermes is for crimsonThe rich kermes red pigment was created by grinding up the dried bodies of insects that lived on the kermes oak tree. Deadly beautySome pigments must be handled with care, including the yellow-hued orpiment and the red-orange realgar, which are derived from arsenic sulfide minerals.Similarly, the crystalline powder copper acetoarsenite, a brilliant shade of emerald green, could be hazardous to an artist’s health. The pigment produced the vibrant background found in the Fogg Museum’s “Self-Portrait Dedicated to Paul Gauguin” by Vincent van Gogh. But it was also highly toxic. Inexpensive to make, the color became a popular shade for household paint near the end of the 1800s and into the early 1900s, but its fumes could prove deadly. Later, the inorganic compound was used in insect repellant. “The ultimate intent is to get the right color,” said Khandekar, “but often artists will take great risks in doing so.”,Green poisonArtists often took risks to create their works, using poisonous pigments like emerald green to get the color just right.,Cadmium yellowKhandekar discusses the use of cadmium yellow by the Impressionists. Red is for RothkoIn recent years, working with the collection helped experts to develop an innovative “virtual” restoration. After analyzing Lithol red, the pigment favored by abstract artist Mark Rothko, Khandekar and a team of scholars developed a technique that used light from a projector to augment the faded colors on a series of Rothko murals that the artist painted for Harvard.“We found that when you tried to fade Lithol red as a powder, it was incredibly stable, but when you mixed it with ultramarine blue and a binding medium it became incredibly light-sensitive. Our analysis helped us understand what was going on with the paint,” said Khandekar. “To be able to treat and best look after works of art, you need to know all the things that are going on with them, and the Forbes Pigment Collection helps us do that.”last_img read more


Students travel to Mardi Gras

first_imgMardi Gras is traditionally celebrated the Tuesday before Lent begins on Ash Wednesday. However, some Notre Dame students celebrated early by traveling to New Orleans last weekend to participate in the festivities.“Something that many people don’t realize is that Mardi Gras Day actually marks the end of weeks of celebration. The season officially starts on Jan. 6, ‘The Feast of the Epiphany,’” Elizabeth Owers, a senior from New Orleans, said. “The timing can vary depending on the length of the season, but generally the balls will be held during January, and most parades happen the two weeks before Mardi Gras.”Mariana Tumminello, a freshman from New Orleans, returned to New Orleans a few weekends ago for the ball of the Krewe of Janus. She said a krewe is an organization that puts on a ball and/or parade for the carnival season. Tumminello was Queen of the Ball, a position that she was put up for when she was five years old, she said.“This year, three of my friends from New Orleans came home for the ball with me. One of them, Courtney Denault, was a maid in my court. I also was able to bring four friends [from Notre Dame] back with me so they could come to the ball and experience a little bit of Mardi Gras,” Tumminello said.Tumminello said her favorite traditions included king cake, parades and watching the tourists.“Every year my entire family comes in town and we stay at a hotel downtown so we can go walk around the French Quarter and all be together, while my dad and my uncles ride in a parade called Hermes,” Tumminello said.Although Tumminello and Owers were not able to return home for the actual holiday of Mardi Gras, Tumminello said she plans to wear her purple, green and gold shirt and beads on Tuesday to connect with the celebration at home.“When you are not in New Orleans, it is very different. Tourists think Mardi Gras is a crazy drunk party … but it’s actually a very family-oriented event,” she said. “I’ve grown up going to parades with family, going to Mardi Gras parties with friends and just enjoying one of the most exciting times in my hometown.”Owers also said Mardi Gras is misrepresented as a holiday.“The images of drunken debauchery on Bourbon Street are not at all representative of most parades – they’re loud and crowded, but they’re a lot of fun and many areas are family friendly,” she said. “I loved being able to march and dance down the parade route, see my friends and family, and be part of such a unique tradition.“At its core, Mardi Gras is a community event that brings people together and allows them to spend a few days just celebrating life.” Tags: Mardi Gras, New Orleanslast_img read more


Burlison and Keeble target French title after near misses

first_img Robert Burlison (Oxley Park, Staffordshire) and Bobby Keeble (Abridge, Essex), who both secured runners-up spots on a recent trip to South Africa, have been named among six England players for the Michel Carlhian Trophy being played at Le Touquet on 27th – 31st March. They will be accompanied to France by Harry Ellis (Meon Valley, Hampshire, IoW & CI), Bradley Moore (Kedleston Park, Derbyshire), Jack Singh Brar (Brokenhurst Manor, Hampshire, IoW & CI) and Ashton Turner (Kenwick Park, Lincolnshire). The competition is a match play event with the first two days comprising 36-hole stroke play, the best 32 players qualifying for the match play over 18 holes until the final which will be contested over two rounds. A Nations Cup event will be played over the stroke play rounds, Ellis, Singh Brar and Turner will comprise the England A team while Burlison, Moore and Keeble will make up the B team. Burlison, (Image Copyright Tom Ward) who will celebrate his 18th birthday on the day of the final, lost a playoff for the Kenako South African World Junior event at Kingswood earlier this month. He also finished second in last year’s South of England Boys Championship and has represented England at under 16 and boys levels in recent years. Keeble, 18, finished runner-up in the Western Province under 23 Stroke Play Championship, his third second place in less than a year. He was beaten in a playoff in the English under 18 Championship for the Carris Trophy last July then finished tied second in the South of England Boys Championship. He was also third in the Daily Telegraph Junior Championship in Ireland and finished fifth on the Titleist/FootJoy England Golf Boys Order of Merit last year. Ellis, 17, became the youngest English Champion when he won the title at Silloth-on-Solway last summer at the age of 16. The Hampshire lad then made his full England debut in last year’s Home Internationals and represented GB&I in the Jacques Leglise Trophy. He was also a member of the victorious England team in the Canadian International Junior Challenge and of the England squad that won the Gold Medal in the recent Australian Youth Olympic Festival in Sydney. Moore, 15, won the English under 14 Championship in 2011 then became an under 16 and Schools international that same year. In 2012, he enjoyed solid performances in the McEvoy Trophy, finishing fourth, fifth in the European Young Masters in Hungary and sixth in the Douglas Johns Trophy. Again capped at under 16 level last year, he was also a member of the winning team in Canada, finishing joint second in the individual rankings. Singh Brar, 16, has been an under 16 cap for the past two years and became a boy international in 2012. The winner of the Hazards Salver in 2011 for the lowest score by a player aged under 16 at the Carris Trophy, he was a joint winner of the Junior County Champions Tournament that same year, while last year he finished sixth in the McEvoy Trophy and the English Under 16 Championship for the McGregor Trophy and finished sixth on the Boys Order of Merit. He was also a member of the squad at the Australian Youth Olympic Festival. He has just returned from Mission Hills in China where he finished second in the Faldo Series Asian Grand Finals. Turner, who turns 17 on the eve of the French event, was also involved in the Australian Youth Olympic festival, winning the Silver Medal in the individual rankings and his great start to the 2013 season continued with victory in the Bernard Darwin Salver at Rye, earlier this week. Another under 16 and boy international, in 2012, when he finished seventh on the Order of Merit, Turner won the Boys County Champions title as well as the Lincolnshire Boys Championship, was third in the Fairhaven Trophy, fourth in the McGregor Trophy, fifth in the North of England under 16 Championship and the Daily Telegraph Junior Championship. He also represented GB&I in the Jacques Leglise Trophy. 22 Mar 2013 Burlison and Keeble target French title after near misses last_img read more


Remembering 9/11 with Solemn Commemoration

first_imgA ceremony hosted by the Monmouth County Park System at the Mount Mitchill Scenic Overlook 9/11 Memorial is one of a few memorial tributes being held around the county this year on the 17th anniversary of the terrorist attacks. Photo courtesy MCPSAtlantic Highlands |Monmouth County Park System will host its annual 9/11 Memorial Ceremony at 8 a.m. Sept. 11 at Mount Mitchill Scenic Overlook.Held at the site of the county’s 9/11 Memorial, the ceremony honors those who lost their lives that day. All are welcome to attend. The event is rain or shine.Monmouth County’s 9/11 Memorial is a tribute to 147 Monmouth County men and women who lost their lives in the terrorist attacks in 2001.Mount Mitchell Scenic Overlook will remain open until 11 p.m. Sunday-Tuesday, Sept. 9-11, to provide additional opportunities to visit the 9/11 Memorial.460 Ocean Boulevard, monmouthcountyparks.comHolmdelMayor Tom Critelli and the Township Committee invite all residents to visit the Holmdel Township 9/11 Memorial at Town Hall Sept. 11 to honor the victims of the 2001 events.All day the township will offer patrons flowers and American flags to display around the Upturned Hands sculpture in an act of remembrance, reflection and respect for those lost.Holmdel’s 9/11 memorial, designed by artist and resident Kyle Galante, stands 9 feet tall by 11 feet wide and is composed of 90,000 pounds of black granite. Etched into the sidewalk that encircles the sculpture is a depiction of the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. The flight numbers of the four planes that were hijacked are etched into the sculpture’s base. The memorial also includes an etching of the World Financial District on its front by artist Philip Hagopian.The shield insignias of the fire department, police department, emergency medical services, and Port Authority are inscribed next to the names of the victims, and the family members of those lost chose the words “freedom, faith, hope, love, family, and unity” to emblazon the granite that surrounds the upturned hands.4 Crawfords Corner Road, holmdelrec.comMiddletownMiddletown will remember 9/11 at the World Trade Center Memorial Gardens, adjacent to the Middletown Arts Center, from 7:30 to 7:45 p.m. Sept. 11. Observe a moment of silence and simple wreath tribute to honor the 37 Middletown residents lost in the World Trade Center attack. Please bring a candle. Parking is available in the Middletown train station parking lot. Rain or shine.36 Church St., middletownnj.orglast_img read more


Humboldt State football beats No. 8-ranked Azusa Pacific in conference opener

first_imgGlendora >> The Jacks have officially put the Great Northwest Athletic Conference on notice.And they’re heading home to Northern California with conference win No. 1 in their pocket.Led by the running of All-American tailback Ja’Quan Gardner and a record-breaking night from quarterback Robert Webber, Humboldt State rolled into Citrus College and came away with a hard-fought 30-19 win over No. 8-nationally ranked and reigning conference champions Azusa Pacific on Saturday night.“What a gutty, …last_img read more


ARC-CO and PLC payments for this fall likely to decrease

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The tight economics of row crop production in 2017 will have many producers looking for some cash flow from farm bill programs when those payments are released this fall.Higher yields in 2017, however, will likely mean smaller payments in October of 2018 compared to last fall.“We saw yields that were pretty high for corn above trend line for some counties for the fourth year in a row in 2017. So looking forward to October of 2018,  I am expecting smaller to no payments for most counties for corn. A couple of counties in western Ohio may trigger a soybean payment but the payments are expected to be a lot less,” said Ben Brown, Ohio State University Farm Management Program
manager. “If you are counting on the money in October for cash flow, I don’t know that we will see as much. Both farmers and ag lenders need to prepare for that.“In 2017 we saw roughly $50 an acre for corn across the state. The only Ohio county that didn’t receive a corn payment was in Ashtabula County because they had higher yields in 2016. Some counties soybeans triggered substantial payments for 2017. Last October saw a pretty nice return from programs in Ohio. I don’t know that we’re going to see that in 2018.”Most of Ohio’s row-crop acres are enrolled in the Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC-CO) Program, with far fewer acres enrolled in the Price Loss Coverage (PLC) Program.“At the start of the farm bill in 2014 there was a one-time choice over the life of the farm bill. In Ohio we saw 97% of soybean acres go into ARC-CO. The program has never returned a PLC payment for soybeans. The PLC payment was set lower than we’d expect market prices to be and it wasn’t attractive for soybean growers in the state,” Brown said. “And 98% of corn acres are in ARC-CO in Ohio. For wheat it was 82% in ARC-CO and 18% in PLC. That was different than the national average for wheat that was 60% PLC and 40% ARC-CO. Looking forward to this next farm bill, farmers will probably get to choose and forward thinking about that is going to be important for their cash flow.”It is also important to note, Brown said, that these farm bill programs only offer a safety net, not a path to profitability.“I do want to make the distinction that ARC-CO and PLC programs don’t make you whole,” he said. “They are only on 85% of the acres so the returns you get back are smaller than you would get if the market was high.”While farmers should prepare for lower farm bill payments this fall, that does not mean there will be none. The final payment numbers still have an opportunity to change from Brown’s estimates. ARC-CO and PLC payments are calculated from a formula using Farm Service Agency (FSA) yields and marketing year average prices. The estimations from Brown use National Agricultural Statistic Service yields for 2017, but the adjusted final FSA numbers will be used for the final farm bill payment calculation. Also, the corn and soybean marketing year is Sept. 1 to Aug. 31, so final prices will not be known for several more months. Brown’s estimates were made using World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) average prices from February. Marketing year average prices of $3.30 for corn, $9.30 for soybeans, and $4.60 for wheat were used for the estimates.As the marketing year progresses, it is likely that these estimates will fluctuate with price. Higher prices moving forward will result in smaller 2018 payments than estimated and lower prices will result in larger payments based upon the 2017 program year, Brown said.“More counties are expected to trigger soybean payments this fall. We have also reached a point where the PLC program is returning larger payments than ARC-CO for corn and wheat. Soybeans are not expected to trigger a PLC payment for 2018,” Brown said. “Expectations for program year 2017 corn ARC-CO payments will be smaller and rare across much of Ohio. This is largely because of the formula benchmark lowering each year as a result of lower prices. In previous years the historical five-year revenue included high prices from marketing year average 2011/12 and 2012/13. Those have been worked out of the formula and the probability of triggering a payment has lowered. The 5-year olympic average price in 2016 was $4.79 compared to a price of $3.95 in 2017. Payment variations across counties happen due to variations in yields. Highland County triggers the largest estimated payment at $37 per acre as a result of a 2017 yield of 167 bushels per acre compared to a 2016 yield of 176. The average payment in 2016 was $57 whereas in 2017 it is estimated at $12. Fewer counties are expected to receive a payment with a smaller average payment in comparison from 2016.” Prepared by Ben Brown Prepared by Ben Brown Prepared by Ben Brownlast_img read more


Heavyweight great Lennox Lewis: ‘Heart says Pacquiao, mind says Broner’

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? “We will see if Pac still has gas in the tank,” said Lewis who also tweeted that he’ll be scoring the fight on @FightScoreCard.Heart says Pac. Mind says Broner. We will see if Pac still has gas in the tank. Don’t know anything about who @BadouJack is fighting but I’m going with Badou! https://t.co/9Mhv6kNi6jFEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars— Lennox Lewis (@LennoxLewis) January 20, 2019 LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Pacquiao (60-7-2) is on his first title defense of the WBA World welterweight strap after he won the title from Lucas Matthysee in July 2018 in Kuala Lumpur.Lewis retired with a professional record of 41-2-1 and once held the IBF, IBO, and WBC World heavyweight titles in different times across in his career.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening WBA welterweight champion Manny Pacquiao (L) and Adrien Broner face off during their official weigh-in at MGM Grand Garden Arena on January 18, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Pacquiao will defend his title against Broner on January 19 at MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. Ethan Miller/Getty Images/AFPMANILA, Philippines—Former heavyweight king Lennox Lewis couldn’t decide which side to put his money on between Manny Pacquiao and Adrien Broner, who are set to slug it out at MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas.Lewis, regarded as the last undisputed World heavyweight champion, said his “heart says Pac. Mind says Broner.”ADVERTISEMENT Manny Pacquiao arrives at MGM Grand for welterweight title defense LATEST STORIES SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion View comments MOST READ PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krausslast_img read more


10 months agoLiverpool boss Klopp confident after Bayern Munich draw

first_imgLiverpool boss Klopp confident after Bayern Munich drawby Ansser Sadiq10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool manager Jurgen Klopp knows his side face a tough two games against Bayern Munich in the Champions League.The Reds were drawn against the German champions in the Round of 16.”For me it’s nice going to Germany. This is a different Bayern than what I played, we are already here for three years,” Klopp told Liverpoolfc.com.”We all know the stadium, the atmosphere will be great. It’s a really nice trip for all our supporters, it’s a wonderful city, so that’s all good.”The flight is not too long and we obviously know more about German football than about any other league.”In the last couple of years they have dominated the German league in the best period of German football. It’s obviously long ago that I played Bayern in a competitive game so I’m really looking forward to it.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more