The coronavirus vaccine: A doctor answers 5 questions

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here With the Food and Drug Administration issuing emergency use authorization for a vaccine to limit the spread of coronavirus, you might have questions about what this means for you. Here, Dr. Jason McKnight, a primary care physician at Texas A&M University, answers five questions about the rollout and distribution underway.By Jason R. McKnight, Clinical Assistant Professor, Primary Care and Population Health, Texas A&M UniversityI hear that I might still have to wear a mask even after I get vaccinated. Why?It will likely be the continued recommendation that everyone wear a mask when in public even after receiving the vaccination for COVID-19. While these vaccines appear to be highly effective in preventing infection from the disease, even at 95% efficacy, that means approximately 5% of people receiving the vaccination may still become infected. Wearing a mask helps decrease the transmission of the virus in those situations in which the vaccine does not prevent the illness.Further, continuing to wear a mask may help prevent the spread of other respiratory illnesses, which can help prevent overwhelming the health care system, as we are already seeing during the pandemic. Finally, it is possible that some individuals receiving the vaccine may have an asymptomatic infection, and wearing a mask also helps prevent the spread of illness in that situation.If I get the Pfizer vaccine for the first dose, how can I make sure I get the Pfizer vaccine the second time?The distribution of the Pfizer vaccine is meant to match the need for the second dose. The clinic, hospital or pharmacy where you are vaccinated will keep a record of the vaccine that you received, as will you, to help ensure that your second dose matches the first dose.The first shipments of the COVID-19 vaccine are loaded into a UPS plane in Lansing, Michigan, on Dec. 13. Rey Del Rio via Getty ImagesHow will public health experts track the safety of the vaccine as it rolls out to bigger groups of people?Public health experts as well as the vaccine manufacturers will continue to track the safety of the vaccine in multiple ways. First, the people who are vaccinated in the clinical trials will continue to be followed to ensure there are no long-term safety issues. Further, there is what is called a phase IV post-marketing surveillance trial, which will allow many people who are vaccinated to be followed long term to ensure no safety complications arise and to ensure that the vaccine remains as effective as originally thought.How will I know when it’s my turn to get a vaccine?To know when it is your turn to be vaccinated, contact either your state department of health or your health care provider. They will be receiving updates and further information about who is to be vaccinated and when. If you have questions about the vaccine and timing of administration, contact your health care provider.Where will I get a vaccine?While the exact distribution of vaccines is not yet solidified, and is dependent on the state in which you reside, most vaccines will likely be sent to hospital systems, health care providers’ offices, and some pharmacies. To find out the nearest location where you can be vaccinated, contact your local health department or your health care provider.This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. The Anatomy of Fear center_img TAGSAnswersCOVID-19MasksPfizerQuestionsThe Center SquareTimelineVaccine Previous article1.7 Million Fewer Floridians are Forecast to Travel for Year-End HolidaysNext articleAdventHealth receives first shipment of COVID vaccines: ‘A watershed moment’ to help stop the virus Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Workers prepare to ship the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine from the company’s manufacturing plant in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Morry Gash/Pool/AFP via Getty Images Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more


Grammy Nominee Josh Groban Could Be Broadway Bound in ‘Something Brand New’

first_imgJosh Groban may be a Broadway baby soon! The Grammy-nominated singer appeared on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen on January 5 and hinted that the Great White Way is in the future (the near future!). Asked when he will hit Broadway, Groban said, “Hopefully in the next year or two.”Is the “You Raise Me Up” singer eyeing anything specific? Groban revealed to Cohen, “Ideally I’d like to do something brand new. There’s a lot of shows that I grew up really loving, but I think it’s always fun to workshop something and work with people fresh and to kind of develop a character and a story. It’s always been a dream of mine and I got kind of sidetracked into this extraordinary, very lucky life that I’ve had. I’ve never left my passion for that so I would love to.” Cohen responded, “You could fill some seats, my brother. Let’s do it; let’s sell some tickets!”We couldn’t agree more! Groban is no stranger to theater—he attended the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, Interlochen Arts Camp and was slated to attend Carnegie Mellon University’s drama program before being discovered by megaproducer David Foster. In 2008 he performed as the Russian in Chess in Concert at Royal Albert Hall in London alongside Rent alums Idina Menzel and Adam Pascal. Check out the videos below to get a sampling of Groban putting that voice to some good musical theater use! View Comments Star Filescenter_img Josh Grobanlast_img read more