Widow to marry homeless man who used to rummage through bins outside

first_imgMs Neininger, who went on to become a mental health campaigner, said: “People with schizophrenia are imprisoned by the voices.”Ken believed everything these voices were telling him, so it was very difficult to have a relationship. I did not know anything about it, but I soon learned.”Because of Mr Selway’s illness, the couple’s relationship has always been celibate, but Ms Neininger believes this has made them even closer.And this meant that for several decades Mr Selway and the Neiningers all lived happily together.Ms Neininger added: “I married at 16 and Norman was a wonderful man and a lovely husband and father. Because there was no sexual jealousy it was fine and Ken and Norman were like brothers. It was like a little paradise, just Ken, Norman and me.”After Mr Neininger died of a heart attack, Mr Selway developed health problems that meant he eventually had to move into a residential home, where he was later joined by Joan. Joan Neininger and Ken Selway at a wedding in GloucestershireCredit:SWNS For a long time, Mr Selway refused all offers of help and money, but he eventually opened up about his own life. He revealed that he had been born in London and had been evacuated to Wales.When the Welsh man he regarded as a father died, he returned home, but his mother could not cope with his mental health problems.After being made homeless, Mr Selway slept in railway stations and shop doorways until he went to Gloucester looking for relatives of his evacuee father and stumbled across a derelict house to sleep in at night.His only belongings at the time were a set of clean clothes, a radio, a fossil he once mined and a few personal pieces that he hid behind a wall.He frequently considered suicide, but Ms Neininger said she spotted an “innate dignity and a measured way of speaking” that made her realise he was from an educated family.Over the next few years, Mr Selway came in and out of the family’s life, but caring for him took a toll on Ms Neininger’s 30-year marriage.At one point, Mr Neininger issued an ultimatum and she moved out into a caravan which Mr Selway would come and stay at.At first they were happy, but Mr Selway’s mental health problems made him unpredictable and he could “fly off the handle”. Mr Selway had become friendly with Ms Neininger and her then husband, but following Mr Neininger’s death, the pair started a romance.Ms Neininger, a great-grandmother with three children, lives with her husband-to-be at a residential home in Gloucester.She said: “When I saw him ferreting through the bins outside a fish and chip shop near my bookshop, I never thought for a minute it would end like this.”But although he was living on the streets, I knew straight away that Ken was a lovely man with a beautiful soul.”Ms Neininger said that from their first meeting, she always felt Mr Selway was different. She spent years battling with Mr Selway’s schizophrenia before proposing last year.They will now become husband and wife on Ms Neininger’s birthday, four days after Valentine’s Day, at Cinderford registry office.She said that when she first saw Mr Selway he was smartly dressed and drank only milk so she presumed he was staying in a B&B and just had nowhere to go during the day.But she said that after reading Down and Out in Britain by Jeremy Sandford, she realised that he could be one of the many people slipping through the welfare state safety net.Ms Neininger added: “The first time I saw him searching for food in a rubbish bin, I silently broke my heart.”She began leaving sandwiches in the bin for him because he would not take any money and eventually, with the blessing of her then-husband Norman, she invited Mr Selway in for a meal. The first time I saw him searching for food in a rubbish bin, I silently broke my heartJoan Neininger Joan Neininger with her first husband, Norman (left), and Ken Selway at a pub in Gloucestercenter_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Joan Neininger and Ken Selway at a wedding in Gloucestershire Joan Neininger with her first husband, Norman (left), and Ken Selway at a pub in GloucesterCredit:SWNS A woman is set to marry a former homeless man she fell in love with after striking up a friendship when she found him rifling through a bin.Joan Neininger, 88, took pity on 89-year-old Ken Selway when she saw him looking for food outside her bookshop while he lived on the streets.She started to make him sandwiches and, over the the years, the couple grew close as she helped him overcome his many demons.The couple’s love story, which began in spring 1975, will now have a happy ending when they tie the knot at a registry office next month.last_img read more


Holidaymakers sue Tui for cost of trauma care after 10ft fall at

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. He added: “At the moment we simply do not know what the future holds, so we are just doing everything we can to ensure that Wendy will be able to get access to the best levels of support as she begins her road to recovery.”But the holiday company has blamed Mrs Brown for the accident, claiming she was negligent.Tui says the path was lit at the time of the accident, the edge was protected by raisededging stone, and a thickly planted border up to 80 cms high.In court papers the firm argues that to fall Mrs Brown must have stepped over a series of edging stones, through plants and over some coping stones and that she must have failed to take enough care to stay on the pathway.In its defence Tui states: “It is denied that the use of the steps, pathways and terraces posed the alleged or any hazard to hotel guests when used in ordinary conditions or in any conditions other than the most extraordinary.” In papers lodged with the High Court they say the drop should have been protected by a rail or barrier and claim that following the accident the hotel erected a wooden fence at the spot where she fell.Mrs Brown, a former telecoms worker, has suffered from a catalogue of mental and physical problems following the accident, including severe fatigue, disturbed sleep and poor concentration.She underwent brain surgery and also had metalwork fitted to stabilise her spine while she was still in Tenerife and according to her legal team at Irwin Mitchell she continues to require significant rehabilitation support, as her injuries continue to have a devastating impact on her and husband’s day to day lives.Her sight is damaged, her speech has been reduced to a whisper, and she needs help in walking.Mr Brown, who has had to give up work to look after his wife and has launched a GoFundMe page to help raise some of the funds he needs to do so, said: “We were walking back to the hotel room and Wendy was slightly behind me when she fell. As there were no wall or railings, she plummeted onto the concrete below.“She was initially unconscious and I performed CPR before she was taken to La Palma Hospital and placed in an induced coma. To see her in such a condition was just awful and I have still not come to terms with the incident.” A woman who suffered permanent trauma after plunging 10 feet onto concrete from a staircase at a holiday resort is suing her travel operator for the care she will need for the rest of her life.Wendy Brown, 56, was three days into her holiday with her new husband Gary, 55, when she fell from the unguarded staircase while returning to their room, suffering severe head and spinal injuries.She was airlifted to hospital in Tenerife where she underwent emergency surgery and spent two weeks in an induced coma.Mr Brown states in court documents that he suffered psychological trauma after witnessing his wife’s fall, including post traumatic stress disorder, an intense phobia of motorway driving, and depression.Fearing she was dead after finding her unconscious and bleeding from a head wound, it was only when she responded to his emergency resuscitation and started to breathe again that Mr Brown realised his wife had survived the fall.The couple, from Bollington, Macclesfield, are now suing holiday firm Tui UK for £200,000 damages, claiming the company was negligent and in breach of contract for its failure to provide reasonably safe accommodation at La Palma & Teneguia Princess Hotel during their holiday in January 2018. read more