Janet Pullen, Cynthia Weldon-Lassiter elected to NAES governing board

first_imgJanet Pullen, Cynthia Weldon-Lassiter elected to NAES governing board Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [National Association of Episcopal Schools press release] The Governing Board of the National Association of Episcopal Schools (NAES) is pleased to announce the election of Janet S. Pullen, Ed.D., Head of School at Saint Stephen’s Episcopal School, Bradenton, Florida, and Cynthia Weldon-Lassiter, Ed.D., Head of School at St. Andrew’s School, Richmond, Virginia, to three- year terms on the board that began July 1, 2014.“We are thrilled to welcome to the Governing Board leaders of such distinction and commitment to Episcopal schools and education,” said Doreen S. Oleson, Ed.D., NAES Governing Board President and Head of School at St. Mark’s Episcopal School, Altadena, California. “I look forward to working with Jan and Cyndy over the next three years as we continue to expand the reach of our mission and ministry,” said the Rev. Daniel R. Heischman, D.D., NAES Executive Director.About Janet S. Pullen, Ed.D.Jan Pullen is in her 12th year as Head of School and in her 27th year as an administrator at Saint Stephen’s Episcopal School. She arrived at Saint Stephen’s in 1988 as the Lower School Director when the school’s K-12 enrollment was 222 students. During her tenure at Saint Stephen’s, the school has been completely rebuilt on the one-campus, 36-acre site and has grown into a school of approximately 700 students in PreK-12, including the United States U-17 Men’s National Soccer team. Jan spent six years as the Associate Head of School and led the Intermediate School (grades 4-6) and the Middle School (grades 7-8) before becoming Head of School.Dr. Pullen holds degrees from Manatee Junior College (A.A.), Florida State University (B.S.) and National Louis University (M.Ed.). In May 2013, she graduated with a doctorate degree (Ed.D.) in educational leadership from the University of Pennsylvania.Dr. Pullen is currently a member of the Board of Directors of Global Outreach-Tanzania, the University ofSouth Florida Bradenton-Sarasota Community Council, and the Board of Directors of the Manatee Chamber of Commerce. She leads accreditation teams for the Florida Council of Independent Schools and continues to make conference presentations for a variety of education organizations. In the community, she is a sustainer member of the Junior League of Manatee County and the Service Club of Manatee County.About Cynthia Weldon-Lassiter, Ed.D.Cyndy Weldon-Lassiter is the seventh Head of School at St. Andrew’s School, which was founded by Grace Arents in 1894. This independent elementary school provides quality, progressive education to children from families with limited financial resources through a full scholarship for every child. The school currently serves 94 students in kindergarten through fifth grade, all from low-income families.Dr. Weldon-Lassiter became Head of School in July 2010, bringing nearly two decades of experience as a teacher, researcher and leader in curriculum and faculty development. Prior to her current position, she was an educator in the Chesterfield County Public School system, as well as The Collegiate School in Richmond, Virginia. Following that, she taught in a K-12 setting at an independent school in Montclair, New Jersey, while attending her doctoral program.Dr. Weldon-Lassiter is a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University, where she received degrees in psychology and education. She earned her doctorate in Curriculum and Teaching from Columbia University after completing research focused on homeless families with young children.About the National Association of Episcopal SchoolsThe National Association of Episcopal Schools (NAES) is an independently incorporated, voluntary membership organization that supports, serves, and advocates for the vital work and ministry of those who serve nearly 1,200 Episcopal schools, early childhood education programs, and school establishment efforts throughout the Episcopal Church. Chartered in 1965, with historic roots dating to the 1930s, NAES is the only pre-collegiate educational association that is both national in scope and Episcopal in character. Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2014- 2015, NAES advances Episcopal education and strengthens Episcopal schools through essential services, resources, conferences, and networking opportunities on Episcopal school identity, leadership, and governance, and on the spiritual and professional development of school leaders. For additional information, call (800) 334-7626, ext. 6134, or (212) 716-6134; or email [email protected]; or visit www.episcopalschools.org Tags Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books People Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Posted Jul 17, 2014 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

La Convención convierte la solicitud diocesana en tasación obligatoria en…

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska General Convention, Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN General Convention 2015, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA center_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Por Mary Frances Schjonberg y Tracy SukrawPosted Jul 6, 2015 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] La Convención General, en las últimas horas de su reunión de nueve días en esta ciudad, hizo obligatorio el sistema de solicitud presupuestaria diocesana, que actualmente es voluntario, para el ciclo del presupuesto 2019-2021 e impuso sanciones para los que no cumplan.La Resolución Sustituta D013 también ajusta el canon de la Iglesia sobre el presupuesto al proceso que se ha venido usando en los últimos años para elaborar el presupuesto.La aprobación final de la D013 se produjo después de que la Convención tomó la decisión relativamente inusual de remitir a un comité de conferencia la versión enmendada por los obispos de la Resolución D013. El proceso del comité de conferencia se usa para crear la forma definitiva de una resolución que ha de someterse a la consideración de ambas cámaras en un período de tiempo más breve del que tomaría devolver la resolución enmendada a su comité legislativo regular. La última vez que se usó [este recurso] fue en 1997, según la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, que participó en ella. En esa ocasión implicó la Resolución A053 para poner en vigor los derechos obligatorios de las mujeres clérigos conforme al estatuto canónico.La tasación obligatoria no se aplicará al próximo presupuesto trienal 2016-2018, sino que entrará en vigor el 1 de enero de 2019. Sin obtener dispensa, una diócesis que no pague la tasación completa no podrá obtener subvenciones o préstamos de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS), a menos que el Consejo Ejecutivo apruebe específicamente el desembolso del dinero.(La Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (DFMS) es el nombre con el cual la Iglesia Episcopal está incorporada, funciona empresarialmente y lleva a cabo la misión).La resolución le permite al Consejo comenzar a otorgar dispensas a diócesis que no pagan, basándose en dificultades económicas, a partir del 1 de enero de 2016. El Consejo convino en enero en crear un llamado Comité de Revisión de Tasaciones Diocesanas para trabajar con aquellas diócesis que no cumplen con la totalidad de la solicitud denominacional.El obispo de la República Dominicana, Julio César Holguín Khoury, se dirigió a los obispos a través de un intérprete durante el debate sobre la resolución, el 3 de julio, diciendo: “por favor, tomen nota del hecho de que hay algunas diócesis que reciben subsidios para ayudarlas en su función presupuestaria, y por lo que entiendo aquí se les está exigiendo que paguen la cantidad total de lo que aquí se especifica. Eso sería muy difícil, por ejemplo, para las diócesis de la IX Provincia que no podrían cumplir ese mandato”.A lo cual el obispo de la Florida John Howard replicó: “Esas son precisamente las circunstancias que esta resolución contempla y por las cuales lo más probable es que se otorgue una dispensa”.El presupuesto 2016-2018 que la Convención adoptó el 2 de julio se basa en parte en solicitar que las diócesis y zonas regionales de misión contribuyan con un 18 por ciento de sus ingresos para financiar el presupuesto de 2016; un 16,5 por ciento para el presupuesto de 2017 y un 15 por ciento para el de 2018.La contribución diocesana de cada año en el presupuesto trienal se basa en el ingreso de la diócesis de dos años antes, menos $120.000. A las diócesis se les pidió este año que contribuyeran con un 19 por ciento de sus ingresos de dos años antes, menos $120.000. El presupuesto 2016-2018 aumenta la exención a $150.000.De las 109 diócesis y tres zonas regionales, 49 diócesis pagaron la totalidad de la solicitud o más en 2014. Una lista de los compromisos y pagos diocesanos de 2013 y de los compromisos de 2014 puede verse aquí.Una copia del presupuesto se encuentra aquí.La principal razón de un comité de conferencia que se reunió el 3 de julio para perfeccionar una versión de la resolución sobre la cual ambas cámaras pudieran convenir fue que los obispos enmendaron la resolución propuesta por el Comité Legislativo sobre Gobierno y Estructura de la Convención General y adoptada por los diputados al eliminar el texto que proporciona un estipendio al presidente de la Cámara de Diputados.El Equipo de Trabajo para Reinventar la Iglesia Episcopal pidió esa compensación en su informe a la Convención (página 12 aquí) y en su Resolución original A004.“Cuando alguien se ofrece voluntariamente para hacer un trabajo, no constituye una injusticia no pagarle”, dijo el obispo Steven Miller, de la Diócesis de Milwaukee, durante el debate en la Cámara de Obispos el 3 de julio.El obispo de Colorado, Rob O’Neill, que después participaría en el comité de conferencia, le dijo a sus colegas durante el mismo debate que “debe sostenerse una conversación cuidadosa y considerada al margen del lenguaje que nos impone la revisión canónica”. Él dijo que quería darle tiempo y espacio a esa conversación para que se produjera en lugar y de manera adecuados.El comité de conferencia añadió 10 decisiones respecto a un salario para el presidente de los diputados, en los que hacen notar que los papeles tanto del Obispo Primado como del presidente de los Diputados continúan evolucionando y la vida y la obra de la Iglesia como un todo “se encuentran en un momento de transición substancial” al tiempo que “las estructuras de la Iglesia siguen evolucionando”. Hay “crecientes demandas de tiempo y energía” del[de la] presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, que también sirve como vicepresidente de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera y vicepresidente del Consejo Ejecutivo.La resolución señala que “la Cámara de Diputados es de la opinión que sólo personas jubiladas o que cuentan con recursos económicos sustanciales tienen la capacidad económica para servir como presidentes de la Cámara de Diputados”, pero que [la Cámara] debería poder elegir a un presidente sin tener en cuenta sus circunstancias económicas. Y la resolución dice que los diputados creen que el salario es cuestión de justicia y que es importante para la Iglesia “explorar completa y abiertamente los problemas del liderazgo”, incluida la compensación del [de la] presidente.“La Cámara de Obispos entiende y aprecia la contundencia de la posición de la Cámara de Diputados, y las cuestiones de justicia que le son inherentes”, decía la resolución.La resolución pide que el Obispo Primado y el presidente de la Cámara de Diputados nombren conjuntamente un equipo de trabajo para considerar los temas del liderazgo y la compensación. El equipo de trabajo hará recomendaciones a la próxima reunión de la Convención.Sally Johnson, diputada de Minnesota, que presidió el comité de conferencia, así como el comité de gobierno y estructura, dijo a los diputados que el comité de conferencia, compuesto por ella, el vicepresidente de los diputados Byron Rushing, el diputado del Sureste de la Florida Tom O’Brian, el obispo de la Florida John Howard, el obispo de Colorado Rob O’Neill y el obispo de Pensilvania Noroccidental Sean Rowe (que también es obispo provisional de Bethlehem) trabajó durante más de tres horas en la resolución de avenimiento. Fue, dijo ella, “una discusión franca, sincera y muy positiva”.Los obispos, agregó, “expresaron preocupación” de que fuera prematuro añadir un estipendio para el[la] presidente de los diputados en este momento sin más estudio y consideración.El lenguaje de la resolución “probablemente no es perfecto”, dijo ella, añadiendo que podría haber sido “más perfecto” de no haberse redactado en medio de la última jornada legislativa de la Convención.Luego de que los diputados aprobaran la resolución del comité de conferencia en una votación de 684 a 84, Jennings encomió el proceso del comité de conferencia, definiéndolo como uno de los instrumentos disponibles para fomentar “la comunicación, la colaboración y la conversación” con la Cámara de Obispos.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Tracy Sukraw es miembro del equipo de ENS en la Convención General. La Rda. Pat McCaughan, corresponsal de ENS, colaboró con este artículo. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY La Convención convierte la solicitud diocesana en tasación obligatoria en 2019 La resolución establece un proceso para estudiar el salario del presidente de la Cámara de Diputados Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 President of the House of Deputies, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Anglican Consultative Council theme highlights current mission challenges

first_imgAnglican Consultative Council theme highlights current mission challenges Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Communion, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York ACC16, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Anglican Consultative Council Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel [Anglican Communion News Service] The overarching theme for the next year’s Anglican Consultative Council (ACC-16) meeting in Zambia, “Intentional Discipleship in a World of Differences,” has been chosen by the Standing Committee of the Anglican Communion as a response to daily Christian challenges.Director for Mission at the Anglican Communion Office (ACO), the Rev. Canon John Kafwanka, welcomed the theme as “the best news for the Communion at this point in time.”Kafwanka explained that “it has become evident in many parts of the Communion that the challenge we face today in Christian discipleship is the divide between ‘professed faith’ and ‘lived faith.’ This is mainly because we have not taken seriously the need to intentionally equip ourselves and our members in considering the implications of faith in Christ in every sphere of our life. The theme for next ACC meeting calls us back to that.”In the past two years, the Anglican Witness group of Anglican leaders and mission practitioners has been advancing the centrality in the life and mission of the Church of equipping all God’s people for intentional discipleship, so that Anglicans and Episcopalians everywhere become intentional in considering how their faith bears on their everyday life experience.Focus on intentional discipleship has come as a response to Christian challenges such as failure to connect faith and professional life, low commitment and impact on community life, lack of confidence to share personal faith and pass it to next generation, and decline in Church membership in some cases.A video, “Being a Christian in everyday life” has been recently published to illustrate some of the current issues both in the Global South and North, and why intentional discipleship is critical.The chair of the Anglican Witness core group, the Archbishop-elect of South East Asia, the Rt. Rev. Ng Moon Hing, said: “In this season of turbulence, intentional discipleship is the way of going forward … I hope and pray that ACC will promote a season of intentional discipleship in the Anglican Communion.”Anglican Witness is gathering a variety of resources to help churches equip their members to be Christ’s credible witnesses in every sphere of their life. It aims to promote good practice from dioceses and parishes where an emphasis on discipleship is already being implemented.Anglican Witness invites people willing to share their own stories and resources to get in touch. Submit a Job Listing Posted Nov 5, 2015 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

Fundadora de Gateway of Grace en Dallas habla con ENS

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Refugees Migration & Resettlement Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Por Lynette WilsonPosted Jul 6, 2017 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Fundadora de Gateway of Grace en Dallas habla con ENS Una entrevista con Samira Izadi Page An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN [Episcopal News Service – Dallas, Texas] Durante una reciente entrevista en su oficina en Dallas, la Rda. Samira Izadi Page, fundadora y directora ejecutiva de Gateway of Grace [Puerta de la Gracia], conversó con Episcopal News Service acerca de su vida, su salida de Irán en 1989, su viaje a Estados Unidos un año después y su ministerio.Gateway of Grace es un ministerio que moviliza a la [Iglesia] Episcopal y a otras iglesias a salvar las brechas socioculturales y a eliminar los temores, las ansiedades y la apatía espiritual que impiden que los cristianos se relacionen con refugiados. Gateway se asocia con más de 50 congregaciones para adoptar a familias refugiadas a su llegada, y proporciona preparación laboral, idioma y otros entrenamientos.Los miércoles por la noche, Gateway of Grace celebra la Comunidad de la Gracia, en la que brinda un espacio para la fraternidad, la oración, el culto, una comida y estudio bíblico para refugiados cristianos que huyen de la persecución en sus países de origen y para refugiados musulmanes que están interesados en aprender acerca del cristianismo. La comunidad incluye a refugiados de 16 países —entre ellos Irán, Irak, Afganistán, Camerún y Siria— y de seis procedencias religiosas.En febrero, cuando el gobierno de Trump anunció por primera vez su decreto ejecutivo que suspendía el programa de reasentamiento de refugiados y restringía los viajes de siete países de mayoría musulmana, Gateway of Grace inició una campaña de 30 Días de Oración por los Refugiados. Muchos de los refugiados atendidos por Gateway of Grace tienen familiares y amigos cuyas vidas se han quedado en un limbo.Tienes una historia increíble. ¿Puedes describir brevemente tu viaje de Irán a Estados Unidos, lo que te llevó a huir de tu país y a buscar asilo político?Mi ex marido era un musulmán suní, yo era chií y a él lo perseguían. Es una historia muy larga, pero una mañana, yo estaba trabajando en mi tesis doctoral cuando tocaron a la puerta y, en el momento en que la abrí, la vida tal como la conocíamos sencillamente terminó. El servicio de inteligencia entró, echaron la casa abajo y encontraron un ejemplar de Los versos satánicos [la novela] de Salman Rushdie y eso fue básicamente el fin para nosotros. Mi marido fue lo bastante afortunado de no encontrarse en casa, pero ellos ocuparon todo lo que teníamos y clausuraron su negocio, congelaron nuestras cuentas y escapamos de Irán con las manos vacías, caminando sobre campos con más de un metro de nieve durante dos noches con dos niños pequeños. Casi nos morimos congelados.Rda. Samira Izadi PageEdad: 44 (cumplidos el 12 de junio de 2017)Nacida en: Shiraz, IránReside en: Dallas, TexasQuién es: sacerdote episcopal en la Diócesis de Dallas y fundadora y directora ejecutiva de Gateway of Grace.Trayectoria profesional: Licenciatura y maestría en filosofía adquiridos en Irán. Asistió al seminario en la Universidad Metodista del Sur [donde obtuvo] una maestría en teología  y un doctorado en ministerio  especializado en estudios misionales de la Iglesia. Ordenada al diaconado en 2010 y al presbiterado en 2011.Fuimos a Turquía. Los hermanos de mi marido nos enviaron dinero desde Dubái y contratamos a contrabandistas que nos llevaron de Turquía a México, y quienes nos dejaron en medio de la Ciudad de México sin nada: con menos de $500 y sin documentación, no teníamos nada. Al décimo día de estar allí, vi una tienda que venía alfombras orientales y pensé que podía tener algo que ver con alfombras persas y entré en la tienda y dije. “¿Tienen algunas alfombras persas?” Por mi acento, [él hombre de la tienda] supo que yo era iraní y me respondió en farsi y yo empecé a llorar. Le dije, “espere aquí, voy a buscar a mi marido” y tan pronto él vino le dijo “¿No eres el hijo de fulano y fulana?” El padre de ese hombre había sido inquilino de mi marido en su pueblo natal. ¿Cuáles son las posibilidades de encontrarte a alguien de tu propio país de unos 60 millones de habitantes, de tu ciudad natal de unos cuantos millones, cuyo padre haya sido tu inquilino, en la ciudad más grande del mundo al décimo día de llegar a ella? Todos los pasos que dimos fueron como ése.Estuvimos allí durante un año, es una historia muy larga, pero luego cruzamos la frontera por Nuevo Laredo y pasamos el río y nos presentamos al puesto de Inmigración y solicitamos asilo. Ellos nos dijeron, “¿Dónde quieren ir?” Mi marido dijo, “Dallas”. Fue realmente un azar. Yo quería ir a California porque es donde hay más iraníes, pero mi marido dijo “vayamos a Dallas”. Fue realmente una cosa de Dios. Y llegamos a Dallas a las 7 A.M. y pensé, muy bien, vamos a conseguir un empleo y un apartamento hoy mismo. Un taxista nos llevó a un Motel 6 cerca de la estación de autobuses del centro. Vi un directorio de Páginas Amarillas, lo cual nunca antes había visto. Comencé a buscar los servicios de localización de apartamentos, empecé a llamar, descubrí que no podíamos alquilar un apartamento porque no teníamos números de seguridad social ni empleos. Vi un centro islámico, los llamé y me dijeron que ellos no podían  ayudarnos, pero que conocían a una señora que trabajaba con refugiados. Me dieron el número, llamé a la señora y ella envió a alguien. A las 9:30 este individuo estaba a nuestra puerta y dijo que tenía un apartamento, [aunque] no estaba seguro de si nos gustaría o no. Nos llevó a un apartamento de dos dormitorios, completamente amueblado. A las 11:30 estábamos en nuestro propio apartamento. Habíamos hecho una compra de víveres y habíamos pagado un mes de alquiler en una ciudad donde no conocíamos ni un alma y sin documentación.Ahora bien, estas personas eran cristianas, pero trabajaban con refugiados bosnios que eran musulmanes. De ahí por qué en la mezquita supieran de ellos. Habían preparado ese apartamento para una familia bosnia que se suponía llegara un mes antes que nosotros, pero nunca se apareció, luego fue cuestión de presentarse. Fuimos a tiro hecho. Cuando le comenté a este hombre mi interés en el cristianismo, me dijo “bien, ¿por qué no vienen a la iglesia con nosotros?” Fuimos. Era una iglesia bautista y me bautizaron apenas seis meses después.A ustedes finalmente les concedieron estatus de refugiados. ¿Dirías que tu viaje fue típico o atípico?Fue atípico porque los refugiados suelen llegar con un estatus legal completo. Ingresan [al país] con tarjetas de la Seguridad Social, tienen permisos de trabajo, pero nosotros no teníamos nada. Fue extremadamente difícil. Es por eso que siento tanta compasión por los refugiados, porque sé por lo que ellos han pasado.Naciste en una familia musulmana chií y te casaste con un musulmán suní. ¿Cómo reaccionó tu familia a tu conversión al cristianismo?Mi familia era nominalmente musulmana, de ahí que nunca tuviéramos una conversación en casa sobre religión. Pero mi mamá sabía que yo había tenido una visión de la Virgen María cuando tenía 6 años, luego cuando me iban a bautizar, llamé a mi mamá y le dije: “Mami, ¿te acuerdas de mi visión?” y ella inmediatamente supo a lo que yo me refería. Le dije: “bien, eso está ocurriendo” y ella se sintió feliz. Ella es ahora cristiana; fue bautizada hace aproximadamente año y medio y ahora está siendo perseguida en Irán.¿Cómo fuiste a dar la Iglesia Episcopal?En mi segundo año de seminario, supe que no podía ser bautista, debido a los sacramentos y a la comprensión del ministerio. Entendía que era algo más ontológico [que tenía más que ver con] quien yo era, que con la función [que desempeñaba], y el director de formación espiritual de Perkins era un sacerdote episcopal, el padre Fred Schmidt. Él está ahora en el [Seminario] Teológico de Garret. Compartí mi testimonio con él y me dijo, “bueno, ¿has contemplado unirte a la Iglesia Católica?”, por cuenta de la visión de la Virgen María. Y le respondí, “bueno, yo tengo un llamado al ministerio”, y él me dijo, “bien, ¿por qué no vienes a mi iglesia y la visitas”. Fui ese domingo. Y hace muchos, muchos años, cuando yo tenía 14 o 15, había tenido un sueño y en ese sueño, estaba sedienta de agua y me veía en un salón hexagonal que era todo de mármol y  completamente cerrado y yo daba vueltas y vueltas y allí en el medio del salón había una fuente. Eso se me quedó presente y aquí estoy muchos años después en Estados Unidos, me hago cristiana y entro en esta iglesia, la iglesia de la Encarnación  [Church of the Incarnation] in Dallas. Y llego tarde y no tengo idea lo que es la Iglesia Episcopal y en consecuencia me siento un poco intimidada, y entro por la puerta trasera, una especie de puerta lateral, y al entrar lo primero que me salta a la vista es esa fuente [la pila bautismal] que yo había visto en mi sueño. Fue así como supe que yo pertenecía allí.¿De donde te vino la idea de Gateway of Grace?Cuando mi curato se estaba terminando comencé a orar preguntándole a Dios qué era lo que él quería que yo hiciera. Y si bien he orado a través de toda mi vida, no es como que haya escasez de clero aquí para que Dios traiga a una mujer iraní con acento a servir en la parroquia, porque por estupendo que eso fuera no tendría nada que ver con mi experiencia, lo que Dios me había enseñado a través de mi experiencia. Luego, empecé a fijarme en la población de refugiados, y en ese tiempo ya yo había trabajado con refugiados durante un par de años. Y comencé a fijarme en lo que tenían a su alcance, y Texas  era el mayor centro de refugiados hasta el año pasado, y ahora ha quedado en segundo lugar después de California. Y advertí que había iglesias que estaban haciendo un ministerio holístico, como la iglesia bautista que me adoptó, de una manera intrínseca, y luego había iglesias u organizaciones o ministerios de refugiados que eran muy seculares: se limitaban a darles cosas a los refugiados para ayudarlos, pero no querían hablar acerca de los temas espirituales. Luego había personas en el otro extremo: ¿eres salvo? ¿No has conocido a Cristo? Y había un montón de programas, pero no había ningún modo sistemático de movilizar las iglesias para hacer un tipo holístico de ministerio que abordara no sólo las necesidades prácticas sino también las necesidades emocionales y espirituales de los refugiados. Cuando estábamos orando respecto al nombre, pensamos, bien, ¿qué es lo único que distingue al cristianismo de todas las otras religiones? Y eso es la gracia. Y el instrumento que Dios usa para comunicar esa gracia al mundo es la Iglesia; por tanto la Iglesia es la puerta de la gracia de Dios, de ahí surgió Puerta de la Gracia [Gateway of Grace].¿Cómo terminaste centrando tu tesis doctoral en decrecer la ansiedad y el temor de los cristianos respecto a los refugiados?Cuando obtuve mi doctorado, quería hacer algo que fuera pertinente a la labor que estaba realizando y quería una manera episcopal muy sistemática y muy anglicana de eliminar temores y prejuicios y apatía espiritual. Esos son grandes problemas, al menos aquí en Dallas, sencillamente lo desconocido. La idea era ¿cómo usar la Escritura, la tradición, la razón y los estudios sociales, todo eso que tenemos en nuestra Iglesia, para abordar  estos problemas específicamente, y desplazar el temor, la ansiedad, el odio, la ira y la ignorancia para participar en la misión de Dios a través del ministerio a los refugiados?¿Por qué crees que los cristianos (estadounidense) abrigan tanto temor y ansiedad?Bueno, en parte es por los medios de prensa. Los medios, ya sean liberales o conservadores, republicanos o demócratas, o cualquier otra cosa intermedia, ofrecen un fragmento de la realidad. No muestran todo el pastel de la realidad, y si bien esas realidades son factuales, no constituyen todo el cuadro y en consecuencia configuran una realidad alternativa que no es fiel. Pero las personas que no están familiarizadas personalmente con los refugiados creen eso porque eso es todo lo que les presentan, de modo que los medios desempeñan un inmenso papel en ello, la manera en que nos presentan el asunto.¿ Has encontrado en tu experiencia que aplacar esos temores  va acompañado de la compasión y de la aceptación y que eso es posible tan sólo a través de las relaciones personales?De eso trata mi tesis. Es todo un taller, todo un proceso de cómo abordar esos problemas, de manera que utilizo antiguos métodos de oración y estudios sociales para abordar los temores y las preocupaciones y crear una formación espiritual y transferirlas de ese lugar al ministerio de los refugiados.A diferencia de Europa, donde una primera generación de musulmanes desafectos ha llevado a cabo ataques terroristas a gran escala, Estados Unidos no ha sido testigo del mismo tipo de violencia. Sin embargo, los estadounidenses viven temerosos de esos ataques. ¿Cómo abordar o mitigar el temor que expresan muchos cristianos estadounidenses blancos? Por venir acompañados de auténtico temor, ven esto en la televisión.Creo que la clave está en reconocer el temor, porque esos temores son reales. Tuvimos un tiroteo en Garland, Texas, que fue perpetrado por extremistas musulmanes, que dispararon contra una biblioteca. Luego esas no son cosas que sean imposible de que ocurran en Estados Unidos, por tanto los temores son reales, ¿verdad? Pero, ¿qué probabilidades tienen? Esa es otra pregunta. Hasta ahora el reasentamiento de refugiados ha sido un programa muy exitoso y no hemos tenido ningún problema con nuestros refugiados. Soy una creyente de origen musulmán y tengo un ministerio holístico. Parte de él es el ministerio evangelístico con los refugiados, muchos de los cuales son musulmanes, muchos de los cuales son muy conservadores, de manera que yo entiendo el temor. En consecuencia, que puedan relacionarse con alguien que reconozca su temor y que sienta simpatías por su temor y no se limite a desestimarlo, ese es realmente el primer gran paso. Las otras partes son, tal como hago en mi taller, la manera en que avanzamos, y eso es mediante este proceso completo que hacemos con nuestros voluntarios y lleva tiempo y paciencia. Pero he visto a personas a quienes no les gustaban los refugiados, a quienes no les gustaban los musulmanes, y que ahora son  inmensos defensores de los refugiados.El Programa de Reasentamiento de Refugiados de EE.UU. es una asociación pública-privada y seis de los nuevo asociados en el reasentamiento son [organizaciones] de carácter religioso. La red de filiales y de [organizaciones] sin fines de lucro que trabajan en el ámbito local también tiende a ser de carácter religioso. Sin entrar en comparaciones o a sostener que el sistema de EE.UU. es necesariamente mejor que el sistema europeo,  el cual varía de un país a otro, ¿propician las asociaciones de carácter religioso mejores índices de integración?Absolutamente.¿De qué manera?Las agencias de reasentamiento, tales como Caridades Católicas y el Comité de Rescate Internacional u otras organizaciones tienen recursos económicos limitados y mano de obra limitada, pero en la Iglesia, nosotros tenemos todos esos recursos. Tenemos la mano de obra y los recursos económicos que necesitamos para ministrar a los refugiados, pero, más importante aún, las agencias de reasentamiento de refugiados o las organizaciones seculares, brindan servicios, y esos duran un número limitado de meses o hasta que los [refugiados] se valen por sí mismos. Pero, ¿qué hacen las iglesias? No sólo se suman a los servicios y corrigen los déficits de los servicios, sino que añaden cuidado [pastoral] cristiano. Los servicios y el cuidado son dos cosas diferentes. Creo que es realmente importante para el proceso de restauración, para el proceso de integración. Y además, encima de eso, allí donde las agencias cesan, las relaciones que las iglesias han creado, y por iglesias quiero decir los cristianos individuales, siguen desarrollándose, y creo que es un regalo para los refugiados que puedan relacionarse con los estadounidenses. La mayoría de los refugiados  nunca llegó a experimentar una auténtica amistad con estadounidenses, particularmente anglosajones.El gobernador. Greg Abbot sacó a Texas del Programa Federal de Reasentamiento de Refugiados, lo cual me indica que a nivel estatal existe alguna resistencia a los refugiados. Sin embargo, el reasentamiento continua con fondos federales canalizados a través de organizaciones sin fines de lucro, y Texas sólo cede el primer lugar a California en el número de refugiados que recibe. ¿Puedes compartir alguna perspectiva sobre esta discrepancia?Los asuntos políticos y los asuntos personales son dos cosas distintas. Creo que la gente de Texas es extremadamente generosa, extremadamente amorosa, en Dallas en particular. O bien Texas es un estado cristiano, y aunque [sus residentes] podrían ser políticamente conservadores, tienen el Espíritu Santo, y el Espíritu Santo los motiva a acercarse a los refugiados y amarlos y servirles no importan que ellos políticamente puedan estar de acuerdo con el reasentamiento de refugiados o que su partido político lo apoye.El alcalde de Dallas Mike Rawlings, por otra parte, asume una postura opuesta a la del gobernador. Él apoya el programa de reasentamiento. Leo que uno de cada cuatro residentes de Dallas ha nacido en el extranjero. ¿Qué hace a Dallas, en particular, acogedora de inmigrantes y refugiados? ¿Cómo han contribuido ellos a configurar la ciudad?Lo que les ha hecho ser tan acogedores es sencillamente el corazón de las personas. No se trata de [una posición] política, son sencillamente buenas personas, muchos de ellos sencillamente buenos cristianos. Es una ciudad muy religiosa, de manera que tendría que ver con eso.Estoy segura de que has leído artículos de cómo los refugiados están revitalizando las comunidades de la llamada “franja de la herrumbre” en el valle del Hudson, donde hay montones de salvadoreños y otros provenientes de América Central que han revitalizado realmente algunos de esos pueblos pequeños. Obviamente, la diversidad fortalece a las ciudades y las comunidades. ¿Has visto eso aquí en Dallas?Sí. Hay un barrio en Dallas que solía ser muy violento. Los refugiados se han reasentado allí y la violencia se ha reducido, y eso puede tener repercusiones en la manera en que se toman las decisiones políticas, como a nivel del alcalde, pero no creo que los dallasitas individuales piensen de esa manera. No creo que piensen ¿qué provecho le sacamos a esto? Creo que ellos sencillamente tienen un corazón bueno, generoso y compasivo.Recientemente, el Tribunal Supremo de EE.UU. ratificó temporalmente partes de la prohibición de viajes del presidente Donald Trump, que le rehusaba el ingreso al país a personas de seis países musulmanes, a menos que tuvieran una conexión familiar o un nombramiento universitario. ¿Cuál ha sido el impacto del fallo del tribunal en la comunidad a la que sirves?Nuestros refugiados están en Turquía. En su mayoría son cristianos perseguidos. Están realmente lidiando con esa decisión porque su situación ahora es desconocida y se encuentran desesperados. Muchos de ellos están considerando si deberían regresar a Irán, y eso sería extremadamente peligroso porque se trata de cristianos seriamente perseguidos. En consecuencia, ha sido un período aproximado de seis meses muy difícil para nuestros refugiados, de todos modos, pero este fallo reciente ha contribuido definitivamente a eso.Entonces, ¿tienes una conexión directa con refugiados que esperan el reasentamiento en terceros países?Los iraníes en particular se encuentra en Turquía; ahora mismo, mi hermana y su marido, entre otros, están refugiados en Turquía. Luego, sí, tenemos una red de refugiados con los que estamos conectados.–Lynette Wilson es la jefa de redacción de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri.last_img read more

Robin Dodge named as Rio Grande’s Canon for Ecumenical and…

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted Oct 2, 2017 Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Michael L. Vono, D.D., announces the appointment of Fr. Robin Dodge as Canon for Ecumenical and Interfaith Dialogue for the Episcopal Diocese of the Rio Grande.Fr. Dodge, who is the Rector of Church of the Holy Faith, Santa Fe, will be inducted as Canon during the opening Eucharist of the 65th Annual Convention of the Diocese of the Rio Grande on October 19 at All Saints Episcopal Church, El Paso. Also to be inducted at the Eucharist will be the Rev. Canon Patricia Soukup, who has been appointed Archdeacon of the Diocese.The Rev. Robin D. Dodge was called to be Rector, following the untimely death of the Rev. Cn. Kenneth J.G. Semon. Bishop Vono celebrated the New Ministry of Fr. Dodge and Church of the Holy Faith following Diocesan Convention on Sunday, October 30, 2016, with a High Holy Mass.Fr. Dodge grew up in Springfield, VT and received a B.A. from Cornell University in 1980, where he studied history with a particular focus England during the reign of the Tudors and Stuarts. He received a J.D. in 1983 from Boston University. As a lawyer, Fr. Robin practiced corporate law concentrating in trademarks, copyrights, and unfair competition, first in Chicago and then in Washington, D.C., with Winston & Strawn (formerly Bishop, Cook, Purcell & Reynolds) and then Venable, Baetjer, Howard & Civiletti.After more than ten years as a lawyer, and wrestling with a perceived call to ordained ministry while a parishioner at Church of Our Saviour in Chicago and Christ Church Georgetown, Fr. Robin entered Virginia Theological Seminary and was awarded an M.Div. in 1999. He was ordained deacon in 1998 and priest in 1999. Fr Robin spent more than three years as Associate Rector of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Arlington, VA, before being appointed Associate Vicar of St. Mary Redcliffe in Bristol, England. Upon the Vicar’s departure in 2004, Fr. Robin served as priest-in-charge. In 2005 he was called to be Rector of St David’s Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C., where he served until he was called to Holy Faith.Since 1986 Robin has been married to Thérèse Saint-André, whom he met at coffee hour at Church of Our Saviour in Chicago. They have two sons, Cameron, age 24, a graduate of St. Albans School in Washington and the University of Virginia, who lives and works in Atlanta, and Barrett, age 21, who is pursuing vocational training. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL People Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Ecumenical & Interreligious, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Robin Dodge named as Rio Grande’s Canon for Ecumenical and Interfaith Dialogue Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

Anglican primates discuss action on climate change

first_img Posted Oct 6, 2017 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Archbishop Thabo Makgoba and Archbishop George Takeli Oct. 5 discuss the primates’ conversations about climate change. Photo: ACNS[Anglican Communion News Service] Disappearing islands in the south Pacific, recent hurricanes in the Caribbean and food security issues in Africa were amongst the items discussed by Anglican church leaders as they discussed climate change and the environment during the Primates Meeting in Canterbury, England.The discussions began on Oct., 3 when Archbishop John Holder, primate of the West Indies, briefed his colleagues on recent hurricanes in the Caribbean; and continued Oct. 5 when the primates heard about disappearing islands in the south Pacific and food security issues in Africa.Later, in an interview with the Anglican Communion News Service, Holder said that he welcomed the primates’ discussion on the environment, saying that it was “very important” for the church to speak out on climate change. “We are connecting these two devastating hurricanes [Irma and Maria] to climate change,” he said. “We can’t prove it but we think there is some kind of climate change element in there.”Commenting on the primates’ discussions, he said: “We were hearing the stories from different parts of the world on climate change,” he said.“And I think we are all convinced it is a fact of life. Even if you take away the term ‘climate change’, something is going wrong with the weather. The weather is becoming extremely destructive and there must be a reason for that.“So, all of us . . . understand this is a problem and we commit to doing whatever we can to alleviate this problem; or at least help people prepare themselves for the bad weather. And when they are devastated or when they have bad experiences, then chip in to help them to reconstruct and revive themselves.”On Oct. 5, Archbishop of Southern Africa Thabo Makgoba began the morning session with a biblical reflection on John 1: 29. He told ACNS that he finished his reflection with “a challenge, as Jesus invites us – as he said to Peter – to feed his lambs, to feed his sheep.“And I lamented the fact that very often when we discuss things as primates we discuss the social justice issue of feeding the lamb and the vulnerable.” He encouraged his fellow-primates to think about “caring for the where the lambs and the vulnerable are – that is the environment” and to “make the linkage between social justice and climate justice.”A number of primates spoke about climate change-issues in their region, including Archbishop Albert Chama of Central Africa, who spoke about food security; and Archbishop Winston Halapua, the bishop of Polynesia in the Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia, who spoke about rising sea levels.“The design of the Primates Meeting is just so overwhelmingly empowering,” Archbishop George Takeli, the primate of Melanesia, said, “particularly the sessions on reflections on the Scriptures.“The reflection by Archbishop Thabo was so deeply transforming – particularly in the invitation to see the world through the eyes of God. That was the greatest challenge and the life-transforming invitation that was given to us this morning when he asked how many provinces were affected by food security and climate change – I think the whole house did raise their hand up.”In a starkly powerful message, he said: “some may see information on climate change on television and take it as interesting reading, as entertainment; some would read it in newspapers and treat it as something to occupy time, but for me – and especially for us in Melanesia – it is actually an urgent matter.”He said that there were three important issues to consider: “The weather pattern throughout the year is no longer consistent, creating surprise cyclone seasons – we have more cyclones than before causing flash flooding. Some places where there are no floods we are getting flash flooding happening.“Secondly, the climate change is affecting the soil – the whole overall environment where you could plant two or three times before and you could harvest the same amount of food, is no longer there.” He said that many Melanesians live of subsistence farming and can no longer grow crops to feed themselves and their families.“Thirdly,” he said, “the sea rise: the sea level rise is effecting some of our islands [which are] are now under water. It is a serious issue. It is a serious concern.”Makgoba is recognised as a leading champion of environmental concerns. He too welcomed the discussions. “What I hope will come from this meeting is a commitment by each primate to pray for social justice issues but to look at those with the eyes of saying the climate, the environment, the earth where they are happening, ought to be cared for,” he said.Takeli added: “What strikes me is the awareness, as I listen to many stories from my brother primates throughout the world I see that I am being buried deep in their own issues as well. They become part of me.“Our stories are making the world become a very small world – that we are part of each other. And what I begin to sense from the Primates’ Meeting is that all of us are moving towards creating a strong network to work together between the primates, addressing the issues of climate change and other issues together.”Who are the primates and what is the Primates Meeting? The provinces and primates of the Anglican Communion are listed here. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Advocacy Peace & Justice, Anglican primates discuss action on climate change Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (2) Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Environment & Climate Change, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL October 6, 2017 at 2:29 pm A Sermon in a NutshellAs people of faith we are all called in different ways to love our God and to love our neighbors. I am with you today to discuss energy. What is the connection?After love it is energy that makes the world go ‘round. Everything we do uses energy, and the energy industry has helped to make this country great. Unfortunately, our energy dependence has produced some very serious side effects.Did we love our neighbors when we brought them to this country from Africa as slaves? Do we love our neighbors when our use of electricity seriously impacts the health of the poor who live in the shadow of coal burning power plants? Do we love our neighbors when our consumption of foreign oil contributes significantly to conflict around the world? And do we love our neighbors when our emission of greenhouse gasses changes the very climate on this fragile earth, our island home?The community of faith has always led in the great movements for justice. We led in the abolition of slavery. We led in the movement for women’s rights. We led in the struggle for civil rights, and we continue to lead in the effort to remove the curse of racism from this land. Now it is time for us to respect the dignity of every human being and all life on earth. Let us begin by addressing our consumption of energy.The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has urged the developed nations to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gasses by eight-five percent in order to stabilize the climate at its current state. The leadership of this country, however, has refused to commit itself to any reduction at all.Religious leaders of every faith have reacted by passing resolutions, writing letters to the President, and lobbying Congress for sustainable energy policies, but we need to do more. It is time to practice what we preach and to show forth not only with our lips, but in our lives what we ask our political leadership to do for us.It is time for the community of faith to practice energy conservation, invest in energy efficiency, and thus save more than enough money to afford cleaner sources of energy. Together, we can save energy, save money, save the planet, protect the peace, protect human health, and create jobs too. As we gain strength in the marketplace, we will have a voice as to where the jobs go and who gets them.This is not just a ministry for the environment, but a call to love and justice for all our neighbors across town, around the world and our intergenerational neighbors, our children, for years to come. And for those of you who are Christians, this is not just a call, it is a commandment. Amen. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rev. Dr. Franklin E Vilas says: Rector Smithfield, NC Primates Meeting October 6, 2017 at 9:20 am The President of the United States has rolled back many of the regulations protecting the environment, and so has joined in the battle against those concerned about climate change. He has just appointed a coal industry lobbyist as second in command of the Environmental Protection Agency, with a clear intent of dismantling this crtucial agency. The Church needfs to spreak out against this destructive administration in the name of God. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Steve MacAusland says: last_img read more

Bishops voice support for Gwich’in people in Alaska

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ General Convention 2018 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishops voice support for Gwich’in people in Alaska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Environment & Climate Change, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service – Austin, Texas] Three days ago, Native Alaskan Bernadette Demientieff appeared at a joint session of the 79th General Convention and spoke about the destruction of the Gwich’in way of life, now threatened by drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.On July 12, the House of Bishops received “with open and broken hearts the witness of Bernadette Demientieff to the struggle and plight of the Gwich’in people” by unanimously passing Resolution X023.The Gwich’in “have been imperiled by the threat of drilling in the ‘Sacred Place Where Life Begins’” on the coastal plains of the wildlife refuge, the resolution said. In approving the resolution, the bishops also affirmed the Episcopal Church’s “historic solidarity with the Gwich’in people in opposing any drilling” in the refuge.Full ENS coverage of the 79th meeting of General Convention is available here.Demientieff spoke on July 10 during one of three TEConversations held at joint sessions of General Convention, each focusing a specific priority: racial reconciliation, evangelism and care of creation.“We are not asking for jobs, not asking for schools, we are asking for the respect to live as we always have and keep our identity as Gwich’in,” she said in her appearance before the House of Bishops and House of Deputies.To the Gwich’in, the refuge is sacred. Their existence has for centuries depended on the Porcupine caribou, whose calving ground lies within the refuge’s coastal plain.Energy companies view the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, particularly its 1.5 million-acre coastal plain, as a potential oil and natural gas bonanza. This conflict has fueled for more than 30 years a contentious debate over whether this coastal plain should be opened to oil drilling or kept as unspoiled habitat.In December 2017, the Trump administration and congressional Republicans opened the refuge to oil exploration. In April this year, a first step was taken toward allowing drilling.Even in times of food shortage and starvation, the Gwich’in haven’t gone into coastal plain, which they consider “the sacred place where life begins,” said Demientieff. After high school, she drifted away from her Gwich’in identity, only to recover it later in life and use her voice to speak for future generations and the animals that cannot speak for themselves.The resolution, proposed by Bishop Wendell Gibbs of Michigan, also asked Episcopalians to “use prayer, advocacy, public witness and legal means to prevent the desecration of ‘The Sacred Place Where Life Begins’” and the destruction of the Porcupine caribou herd and the Gwich’in people.– Mike Patterson is a San Antonio-based freelance writer and correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. He is a member of ENS General Convention reporting team and can be reached at [email protected] Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC General Convention, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Mike PattersonPosted Jul 12, 2018 Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

New England Bishops respond to President Donald Trump’s photo op

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Posted Jun 2, 2020 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ George Floyd Statements Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 June 2, 2020What President Trump did in front of St. John’s Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square on the evening of June 1 was disgraceful and morally repugnant.  Displaying a Bible from which he did not quote, using as a mere backdrop an Episcopal church where he did not pray, and – more callously – ordering law enforcement to clear, with force and tear gas, a path through demonstrators who had gathered in peace, President Trump distorted for his own purposes the cherished symbols of our faith to condone and stoke yet more violence.His tactic was obvious.  Simply by holding aloft an unopened Bible he presumed to claim Christian endorsement and imply that of The Episcopal Church.  Far more disturbingly, he seemed to be affecting the authority of the God and Savior we worship and serve, in order to support his own authority and to wield enhanced use of military force in a perverted attempt to restore peace to our nation.His actions did nothing to mend the torn social fabric of our nation. Instead, they were a blatant attempt to drive a wedge between the people of this nation, and even between people of faith.  No matter where we may stand on the partisan spectrum, we, as Christian leaders called to proclaim a God of love, find his actions repugnant.  Jesus taught us to love our enemies, to seek healing over division, and make peace in the midst of violence.Our church may rightly feel outraged and insulted by having the symbols of our faith used as a set prop in a cynical political drama.  The real abomination before us, however, is the continued oppression of and violence against people of color in this nation.  Let us reserve and focus the energies of our indignation to serve our Lord Jesus Christ’s higher purpose: to extend love and mercy and justice for all, and especially for those whose life, liberty, and very humanity is threatened by the persistent sin of systemic racism and the contagion of white supremacy.The Rt. Rev. Laura J. Ahrens, Bishop Suffragan, ConnecticutThe Rt. Rev. Ian T. Douglas, Bishop Diocesan, ConnecticutThe Rt. Rev. Thomas James Brown, Bishop Diocesan, MaineThe Rt. Rev. Alan M. Gates, Bishop Diocesan, MassachusettsThe Rt. Rev. Gayle E. Harris, Bishop Suffragan, MassachusettsThe Rt. Rev. A. Robert Hirschfeld, Bishop Diocesan, New HampshireThe Rt. Rev. W. Nicholas Knisely, Bishop Diocesan, Rhode IslandThe Rt. Rev. Shannon MacVean-Brown, Bishop Diocesan, VermontThe Rt. Rev. Douglas J. Fisher, Bishop Diocesan, Western Massachusetts Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY New England Bishops respond to President Donald Trump’s photo op The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tagslast_img read more

Errol Shooter Charged with First Degree Murder

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here 1 COMMENT I know Sean was not an angel but no deserves to be murdered. Thank God for justice. Amen April 9, 2017 at 2:01 pm LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 center_img Neff arrested in Winter ParkPaul NeffAn arrest warrant was issued for Paul Neff on Tuesday, February 4th for First Degree Murder. Neff was taken into custody in Winter Park this morning and has been booked into the Orange County Jail.On November 5th, 2015 at 8:30 p.m., Apopka Police responded to 1050 Villa Lane for a fatal shooting. Paul Neff called 911 after he shot his roommate, Sean Davis.No one else was present when the shooting occurred. Paul Neff initially claimed he fired in self-defense, but the JHIT investigation found differently.Over the course of the investigation detectives learned there was a lag time from when the fatal shot was fired to when Neff called 911. They also found discrepancies in the crime scene that did not support a self-defense claim. Neff and Davis were living together and in a relationship at the time of Davis’ death.Sean DavisDetectives traveled throughout the state, making contact with friends and family of Davis during the investigation. And in the two days leading up to Davis’ death, Neff made multiple threats to shoot and kill him over text messages.The Joint Homicide Investigation Team (JHIT) and the Apopka Police Department have a partnership for all Homicide Investigations in Apopka to be conducted by JHIT. Please enter your name here Reply TAGSApopka Police DepartmentJHITPaul NeffSean Davis Previous articleBurglary Report – Week Ending 1/31/2016Next articleDracula vs. Van Helsing Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! Janet Greene Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Thuy Lowe officially kicks off campaign

first_img TAGS10th Congressional DistrictThuy Lowe Previous articleApopka High Bowling Team at Nationals: Day 2Next articleBlue Darter takes 2nd at Bowling Nationals Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your comment! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By Frank TorresOn Saturday night in Windermere, Businesswoman Thuy Lowe officially kicked off her campaign for Congress in Florida’s 10th district surrounded by friends and family. Many speakers on her program were also convinced they knew which candidate from the competitive 10th District Democratic primary they would face in the November general election.“Today, I stand with you, who fight to save millions of unborn babies, to protect our religious freedom and constitutional rights that are under assault.” Lowe began. “I am passionate about restoring the American dream. I’m running for Congress because I care about this community and this great country I grew up in.”Use this link to read more about who was there and what was said, including how Lowe journeyed from war-ridden Vietnam to Central Florida and who she expects to face in the General Election.last_img read more